Searching for imaging : 191 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

22.56J Noninvasive Imaging in Biology and Medicine (MIT) 22.56J Noninvasive Imaging in Biology and Medicine (MIT)

Description

22.56J aims to give graduate students and advanced undergraduates background in the theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods to biology and medicine, with emphasis on neuroimaging. The course focuses on the modalities most frequently used in scientific research (X-ray CT, PET/SPECT, MRI, and optical imaging), and includes discussion of molecular imaging approaches used in conjunction with these scanning methods. Lectures by the professor will be supplemented by in-class discussions of problems in research, and hands-on demonstrations of imaging systems. 22.56J aims to give graduate students and advanced undergraduates background in the theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods to biology and medicine, with emphasis on neuroimaging. The course focuses on the modalities most frequently used in scientific research (X-ray CT, PET/SPECT, MRI, and optical imaging), and includes discussion of molecular imaging approaches used in conjunction with these scanning methods. Lectures by the professor will be supplemented by in-class discussions of problems in research, and hands-on demonstrations of imaging systems.

Subjects

theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods | theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods | biology | biology | medicine | medicine | neuroimaging | neuroimaging | X-ray CT | X-ray CT | PET/SPECT | PET/SPECT | MRI | MRI | optical imaging | optical imaging | molecular imaging | molecular imaging | scanning methods | scanning methods | imaging systems | imaging systems | 22.56 | 22.56 | 2.761 | 2.761 | 20.483 | 20.483 | HST.561 | HST.561 | 9.713J | 9.713J | 9.713 | 9.713

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

MAS.963 Special Topics: Computational Camera and Photography (MIT) MAS.963 Special Topics: Computational Camera and Photography (MIT)

Description

A computational camera attempts to digitally capture the essence of visual information by exploiting the synergistic combination of task-specific optics, illumination, sensors and processing. In this course we will study this emerging multi-disciplinary field at the intersection of signal processing, applied optics, computer graphics and vision, electronics, art, and online sharing through social networks. If novel cameras can be designed to sample light in radically new ways, then rich and useful forms of visual information may be recorded — beyond those present in traditional photographs. Furthermore, if computational process can be made aware of these novel imaging models, them the scene can be analyzed in higher dimensions and novel aesthetic renderings of the visual information A computational camera attempts to digitally capture the essence of visual information by exploiting the synergistic combination of task-specific optics, illumination, sensors and processing. In this course we will study this emerging multi-disciplinary field at the intersection of signal processing, applied optics, computer graphics and vision, electronics, art, and online sharing through social networks. If novel cameras can be designed to sample light in radically new ways, then rich and useful forms of visual information may be recorded — beyond those present in traditional photographs. Furthermore, if computational process can be made aware of these novel imaging models, them the scene can be analyzed in higher dimensions and novel aesthetic renderings of the visual information

Subjects

signal processing; applied optics; Computer graphics; computer vision; online photo; digital photography; digital imaging; visual art image processing | signal processing; applied optics; Computer graphics; computer vision; online photo; digital photography; digital imaging; visual art image processing | image sensor | image sensor | image reconstruction | image reconstruction | medical imaging | medical imaging | mblog | mblog | biomimetics | biomimetics | lens | lens | spectrum | spectrum | multi-spectral | multi-spectral | 3D imaging | 3D imaging | thermal imaging | thermal imaging | high-speed imaging | high-speed imaging | polarization | polarization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.717J Optical Engineering (MIT) 2.717J Optical Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course concerns the theory and practice of optical methods in engineering and system design, with an emphasis on diffraction, statistical optics, holography, and imaging. It provides the engineering methodology skills necessary to incorporate optical components in systems serving diverse areas such as precision engineering and metrology, bio-imaging, and computing (sensors, data storage, communication in multi-processor systems). Experimental demonstrations and a design project are included. This course concerns the theory and practice of optical methods in engineering and system design, with an emphasis on diffraction, statistical optics, holography, and imaging. It provides the engineering methodology skills necessary to incorporate optical components in systems serving diverse areas such as precision engineering and metrology, bio-imaging, and computing (sensors, data storage, communication in multi-processor systems). Experimental demonstrations and a design project are included.

Subjects

optical methods in engineering and system design | optical methods in engineering and system design | diffraction | statistical optics | holography | and imaging | diffraction | statistical optics | holography | and imaging | Statistical Optics | Inverse Problems (i.e. theory of imaging) | Statistical Optics | Inverse Problems (i.e. theory of imaging) | applications in precision engineering and metrology | bio-imaging | and computing (sensors | data storage | communication in multi-processor systems) | applications in precision engineering and metrology | bio-imaging | and computing (sensors | data storage | communication in multi-processor systems) | Fourier optics | Fourier optics | probability | probability | stochastic processes | stochastic processes | light statistics | light statistics | theory of light coherence | theory of light coherence | van Cittert-Zernicke Theorem | van Cittert-Zernicke Theorem | statistical optics applications | statistical optics applications | inverse problems | inverse problems | information-theoretic views | information-theoretic views | information theory | information theory | 2.717 | 2.717 | MAS.857 | MAS.857

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.341 Brightening up Life: Harnessing the Power of Fluorescence Imaging to Observe Biology in Action (MIT) 7.341 Brightening up Life: Harnessing the Power of Fluorescence Imaging to Observe Biology in Action (MIT)

Description

One summer in the 1960s a young Japanese researcher, with the help of a few high school students, chopped up ten thousand jellyfish. As a by-product of this harvest, they isolated a green fluorescent protein (GFP). Since then, GFP has triggered a revolution in our understanding of gene expression and signaling in live cells. In this seminar, we will examine how this small protein generates fluorescence, i.e. absorbs light of one wavelength and emits light of a longer wavelength. We will discuss how the color palette has been extended from green to blue, red and many other colors, based on protein engineering of GFP and the study of vividly colorful coral reefs. We will then investigate how these fluorescent proteins can be used to track the motion of DNA, RNA and protein in living cells, a One summer in the 1960s a young Japanese researcher, with the help of a few high school students, chopped up ten thousand jellyfish. As a by-product of this harvest, they isolated a green fluorescent protein (GFP). Since then, GFP has triggered a revolution in our understanding of gene expression and signaling in live cells. In this seminar, we will examine how this small protein generates fluorescence, i.e. absorbs light of one wavelength and emits light of a longer wavelength. We will discuss how the color palette has been extended from green to blue, red and many other colors, based on protein engineering of GFP and the study of vividly colorful coral reefs. We will then investigate how these fluorescent proteins can be used to track the motion of DNA, RNA and protein in living cells, a

Subjects

Green Fluorescent Protein | Green Fluorescent Protein | Fluorescent protein engineering | Fluorescent protein engineering | Photoconversion | Photoconversion | fluorescent protein variants | fluorescent protein variants | fluorescent microscopy facility | fluorescent microscopy facility | Quantitative fluorescent imaging | Quantitative fluorescent imaging | ultra-sensitive fluorescent imaging | ultra-sensitive fluorescent imaging | high-throughput analysis | high-throughput analysis | Fluorescent imaging in living organisms | Fluorescent imaging in living organisms | phycoerythrin | phycoerythrin | phytochrome | phytochrome | jellyfish | jellyfish | red fluorescent protein | red fluorescent protein | photoactivation | photoactivation | chromophore | chromophore | protonation | protonation | lysosomes | lysosomes | recombinant protein molecules | recombinant protein molecules

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

22.058 Principles of Medical Imaging (MIT) 22.058 Principles of Medical Imaging (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging and its applications. It includes a series of lectures with a parallel set of recitations that provide demonstrations of basic principles. Both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation are covered, including x-ray, PET, MRI, and ultrasound. Emphasis on the physics and engineering of image formation. An introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging and its applications. It includes a series of lectures with a parallel set of recitations that provide demonstrations of basic principles. Both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation are covered, including x-ray, PET, MRI, and ultrasound. Emphasis on the physics and engineering of image formation.

Subjects

general imaging principles | | general imaging principles | | linear optics | | linear optics | | ray tracing | | ray tracing | | Linear Imaging Systems | | Linear Imaging Systems | | Space Invariance | | Space Invariance | | Pin-hole camera | | Pin-hole camera | | Fourier Transformations | | Fourier Transformations | | Modulation Transfer Functions | | Modulation Transfer Functions | | Fourier convolution | | Fourier convolution | | Sampling | | Sampling | | Nyquist | | Nyquist | | counting statistics | | counting statistics | | additive noise | | additive noise | | optical imaging | | optical imaging | | Radiation types | | Radiation types | | Radiation detection | | Radiation detection | | photon detection | | photon detection | | spectra | | spectra | | attenuation | | attenuation | | Planar X-ray imaging | | Planar X-ray imaging | | Projective Imaging | | Projective Imaging | | X-ray CT | | X-ray CT | | Ultrasound | | Ultrasound | | microscopy | k-space | | microscopy | k-space | | NMR pulses | | NMR pulses | | f2-D gradient | | f2-D gradient | | spin echoes | | spin echoes | | 3-D methods of MRI | | 3-D methods of MRI | | volume localized spectroscopy | volume localized spectroscopy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Waves and Imaging (MIT) 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Waves and Imaging (MIT)

Description

This class covers the mathematics of inverse problems involving waves, with examples taken from reflection seismology, synthetic aperture radar, and computerized tomography. This class covers the mathematics of inverse problems involving waves, with examples taken from reflection seismology, synthetic aperture radar, and computerized tomography.

Subjects

waves | waves | imaging | imaging | radar imaging | radar imaging | seismic imaging | seismic imaging | Radon transform | Radon transform | backprojection | backprojection | reflection seismology | reflection seismology | computerized tomography | computerized tomography | synthetic aperture radar | synthetic aperture radar

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT) HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team-taught multidisciplinary course provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. It begins with in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include: fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, and building and applying statistical models for fMRI data; and human subject issues including informed consent, institutional review board requirements and safety in the high field environment. Additional Facul This team-taught multidisciplinary course provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. It begins with in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include: fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, and building and applying statistical models for fMRI data; and human subject issues including informed consent, institutional review board requirements and safety in the high field environment. Additional Facul

Subjects

medical imaging | medical imaging | medical lab | medical lab | medical technology | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | magnetic resonance imaging | MRI | MRI | fMRI | fMRI | signal processing | signal processing | human brain mapping | human brain mapping | function | function | image formation physics | image formation physics | metabolism | metabolism | psychology | psychology | physiology | physiology | image signals | image signals | image processing | image processing | parenchymal | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | neurology | neurology | functional data analysis | functional data analysis | experimental design | experimental design | statistical models | statistical models | human subjects | human subjects | informed consent | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | institutional review board requirements | safety | safety | medical | medical | brain scan | brain scan | brain imaging | brain imaging | DTI | DTI | vision | vision

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-HST.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

MAS.963 Special Topics: Computational Camera and Photography (MIT)

Description

A computational camera attempts to digitally capture the essence of visual information by exploiting the synergistic combination of task-specific optics, illumination, sensors and processing. In this course we will study this emerging multi-disciplinary field at the intersection of signal processing, applied optics, computer graphics and vision, electronics, art, and online sharing through social networks. If novel cameras can be designed to sample light in radically new ways, then rich and useful forms of visual information may be recorded — beyond those present in traditional photographs. Furthermore, if computational process can be made aware of these novel imaging models, them the scene can be analyzed in higher dimensions and novel aesthetic renderings of the visual information

Subjects

signal processing; applied optics; Computer graphics; computer vision; online photo; digital photography; digital imaging; visual art image processing | image sensor | image reconstruction | medical imaging | mblog | biomimetics | lens | spectrum | multi-spectral | 3D imaging | thermal imaging | high-speed imaging | polarization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

22.56J Noninvasive Imaging in Biology and Medicine (MIT)

Description

22.56J aims to give graduate students and advanced undergraduates background in the theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods to biology and medicine, with emphasis on neuroimaging. The course focuses on the modalities most frequently used in scientific research (X-ray CT, PET/SPECT, MRI, and optical imaging), and includes discussion of molecular imaging approaches used in conjunction with these scanning methods. Lectures by the professor will be supplemented by in-class discussions of problems in research, and hands-on demonstrations of imaging systems.

Subjects

theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods | biology | medicine | neuroimaging | X-ray CT | PET/SPECT | MRI | optical imaging | molecular imaging | scanning methods | imaging systems | 22.56 | 2.761 | 20.483 | HST.561 | 9.713J | 9.713

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

22.A09 Career Options for Biomedical Research (MIT) 22.A09 Career Options for Biomedical Research (MIT)

Description

This course has been designed as a seminar to give students an understanding of how scientists with medical or scientific degrees conduct research in both hospital and academic settings. There will be interactive discussions with research clinicians and scientists about the career opportunities and research challenges in the biomedical field, which an MIT student might prepare for by obtaining an MD, PhD, or combined degrees. The seminar will be held in a case presentation format, with topics chosen from the radiological sciences, including current research in magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other nuclear imaging techniques, and advances in radiation therapy. With the lectures as background, we will also examine alternative and related options such as biomedica This course has been designed as a seminar to give students an understanding of how scientists with medical or scientific degrees conduct research in both hospital and academic settings. There will be interactive discussions with research clinicians and scientists about the career opportunities and research challenges in the biomedical field, which an MIT student might prepare for by obtaining an MD, PhD, or combined degrees. The seminar will be held in a case presentation format, with topics chosen from the radiological sciences, including current research in magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other nuclear imaging techniques, and advances in radiation therapy. With the lectures as background, we will also examine alternative and related options such as biomedica

Subjects

freshman seminar | freshman seminar | career | career | career planning | career planning | biotech | biotech | hospital | hospital | imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | biologist | biologist | radiation science | radiation science | research | research | scientist | scientist | doctor | doctor | medicine | medicine | MRI | MRI | radiology | radiology | neuroscience | neuroscience

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

22.A09 Career Options for Biomedical Research (MIT) 22.A09 Career Options for Biomedical Research (MIT)

Description

This course has been designed as a seminar to give students an understanding of how scientists with medical or scientific degrees conduct research in both hospital and academic settings. There will be interactive discussions with research clinicians and scientists about the career opportunities and research challenges in the biomedical field, which an MIT student might prepare for by obtaining an MD, PhD, or combined degrees. The seminar will be held in a case presentation format, with topics chosen from the radiological sciences, including current research in magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other nuclear imaging techniques, and advances in radiation therapy. With the lectures as background, we will also examine alternative and related options such as biomedica This course has been designed as a seminar to give students an understanding of how scientists with medical or scientific degrees conduct research in both hospital and academic settings. There will be interactive discussions with research clinicians and scientists about the career opportunities and research challenges in the biomedical field, which an MIT student might prepare for by obtaining an MD, PhD, or combined degrees. The seminar will be held in a case presentation format, with topics chosen from the radiological sciences, including current research in magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other nuclear imaging techniques, and advances in radiation therapy. With the lectures as background, we will also examine alternative and related options such as biomedica

Subjects

freshman seminar | freshman seminar | career | career | career planning | career planning | biotech | biotech | hospital | hospital | imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | biologist | biologist | radiation science | radiation science | research | research | scientist | scientist | doctor | doctor | medicine | medicine | MRI | MRI | radiology | radiology | neuroscience | neuroscience

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT) 9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

We are now at an unprecedented point in the field of neuroscience: We can watch the human brain in action as it sees, thinks, decides, reads, and remembers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the only method that enables us to monitor local neural activity in the normal human brain in a noninvasive fashion and with good spatial resolution. A large number of far-reaching and fundamental questions about the human mind and brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of this technology. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information including object recognition, mental imagery, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, and visual memory. The goals of this course are to help We are now at an unprecedented point in the field of neuroscience: We can watch the human brain in action as it sees, thinks, decides, reads, and remembers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the only method that enables us to monitor local neural activity in the normal human brain in a noninvasive fashion and with good spatial resolution. A large number of far-reaching and fundamental questions about the human mind and brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of this technology. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information including object recognition, mental imagery, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, and visual memory. The goals of this course are to help

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | neural activity | human | human | brain | brain | noninvasive | noninvasive | resolution | resolution | high-level vision | high-level vision | object recognition | object recognition | visual attention | visual attention | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visually guided action | visual memory | visual memory | voxelwise analysis | voxelwise analysis | conjugate mirroring | conjugate mirroring | interleaved stimulus presentation | interleaved stimulus presentation | magnetization following excitation | magnetization following excitation | active voxels | active voxels | scanner drift | scanner drift | trial sorting | trial sorting | collinear factors | collinear factors | different model factors | different model factors | mock scanner | mock scanner | scanner session | scanner session | visual stimulation task | visual stimulation task | hemoglobin signal | hemoglobin signal | labeling plane | labeling plane | nearby voxels | nearby voxels | shimming coils | shimming coils | bias field estimation | bias field estimation | conscious encoding | conscious encoding | spiral imaging | spiral imaging | functional resolution | functional resolution | hemodynamic activity | hemodynamic activity | direct cortical stimulation | direct cortical stimulation | physiological noise | physiological noise | refractory effects | refractory effects | independent statistical tests. | independent statistical tests.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-9.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

20.453J Biomedical Information Technology (MIT) 20.453J Biomedical Information Technology (MIT)

Description

This course teaches the design of contemporary information systems for biological and medical data. Examples are chosen from biology and medicine to illustrate complete life cycle information systems, beginning with data acquisition, following to data storage and finally to retrieval and analysis. Design of appropriate databases, client-server strategies, data interchange protocols, and computational modeling architectures. Students are expected to have some familiarity with scientific application software and a basic understanding of at least one contemporary programming language (e.g. C, C++, Java, Lisp, Perl, Python). A major term project is required of all students. This subject is open to motivated seniors having a strong interest in biomedical engineering and information system desig This course teaches the design of contemporary information systems for biological and medical data. Examples are chosen from biology and medicine to illustrate complete life cycle information systems, beginning with data acquisition, following to data storage and finally to retrieval and analysis. Design of appropriate databases, client-server strategies, data interchange protocols, and computational modeling architectures. Students are expected to have some familiarity with scientific application software and a basic understanding of at least one contemporary programming language (e.g. C, C++, Java, Lisp, Perl, Python). A major term project is required of all students. This subject is open to motivated seniors having a strong interest in biomedical engineering and information system desig

Subjects

20.453 | 20.453 | 2.771 | 2.771 | HST.958 | HST.958 | imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | metadata | metadata | molecular biology | molecular biology | medical records | medical records | DICOM | DICOM | RDF | RDF | OWL | OWL | SPARQL | SPARQL | SBML | SBML | CellML | CellML | semantic web | semantic web | BioHaystack | BioHaystack | database | database | schema | schema | ExperiBase | ExperiBase | genomics | genomics | proteomics | proteomics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | computational biology | computational biology | clinical decision support | clinical decision support | clinical trial | clinical trial | microarray | microarray | gel electrophoresis | gel electrophoresis | diagnosis | diagnosis | pathway modeling | pathway modeling | XML | XML | SQL | SQL | relational database | relational database | biological data | biological data | ontologies | ontologies | drug development | drug development | drug discovery | drug discovery | drug target | drug target | pharmaceutical | pharmaceutical | gene sequencing | gene sequencing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

20.453J Biomedical Information Technology (BE.453J) (MIT) 20.453J Biomedical Information Technology (BE.453J) (MIT)

Description

The objective of this subject is to teach the design of contemporary information systems for biological and medical data. These data are growing at a prodigious rate, and new information systems are required. This subject will cover examples from biology and medicine to illustrate complete life cycle information systems, beginning with data acquisition, following to data storage and finally to retrieval and analysis. Design of appropriate databases, client-server strategies, data interchange protocols, and computational modeling architectures will be covered. Students are expected to have some familiarity with scientific application software and a basic understanding of at least one contemporary programming language (C, C++, Java®, Lisp, Perl, Python, etc.). A major term project is The objective of this subject is to teach the design of contemporary information systems for biological and medical data. These data are growing at a prodigious rate, and new information systems are required. This subject will cover examples from biology and medicine to illustrate complete life cycle information systems, beginning with data acquisition, following to data storage and finally to retrieval and analysis. Design of appropriate databases, client-server strategies, data interchange protocols, and computational modeling architectures will be covered. Students are expected to have some familiarity with scientific application software and a basic understanding of at least one contemporary programming language (C, C++, Java®, Lisp, Perl, Python, etc.). A major term project is

Subjects

imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | metadata | metadata | medical record | medical record | DICOM | DICOM | computer architecture | computer architecture | client-server architecture | client-server architecture | SEM | SEM | TEM | TEM | OME | OME | RDF | RDF | semantic web | semantic web | BioHaystack | BioHaystack | database | database | schema | schema | ExperiBase | ExperiBase | genomics | genomics | proteomics | proteomics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | clinical decision support | clinical decision support | microarray | microarray | gel electrophoresis | gel electrophoresis | diagnosis | diagnosis | 20.453 | 20.453 | 2.771 | 2.771 | HST.958 | HST.958

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT) HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod

Subjects

medical imaging | medical imaging | medical lab | medical lab | medical technology | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | magnetic resonance imaging | fMRI | fMRI | signal processing | signal processing | human brain mapping | human brain mapping | function | function | image formation physics | image formation physics | metabolism | metabolism | psychology | psychology | image signals | image signals | parenchymal | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | functional data analysis | functional data analysis | experimental design | experimental design | statistical models | statistical models | human subjects | human subjects | informed consent | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | institutional review board requirements | safety | safety | medical | medical | brain scan | brain scan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

HST.582J Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (MIT) HST.582J Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (MIT)

Description

This course presents the fundamentals of digital signal processing with particular emphasis on problems in biomedical research and clinical medicine. It covers principles and algorithms for processing both deterministic and random signals. Topics include data acquisition, imaging, filtering, coding, feature extraction, and modeling. The focus of the course is a series of labs that provide practical experience in processing physiological data, with examples from cardiology, speech processing, and medical imaging. The labs are done in MATLAB® during weekly lab sessions that take place in an electronic classroom. Lectures cover signal processing topics relevant to the lab exercises, as well as background on the biological signals processed in the labs. This course presents the fundamentals of digital signal processing with particular emphasis on problems in biomedical research and clinical medicine. It covers principles and algorithms for processing both deterministic and random signals. Topics include data acquisition, imaging, filtering, coding, feature extraction, and modeling. The focus of the course is a series of labs that provide practical experience in processing physiological data, with examples from cardiology, speech processing, and medical imaging. The labs are done in MATLAB® during weekly lab sessions that take place in an electronic classroom. Lectures cover signal processing topics relevant to the lab exercises, as well as background on the biological signals processed in the labs.

Subjects

HST.582 | HST.582 | 6.555 | 6.555 | 16.456 | 16.456 | signal processing | signal processing | medicine | medicine | biological signal | biological signal | diagnosis | diagnosis | diagnostic tool | diagnostic tool | physiology | physiology | cardiology | cardiology | speech recognition | speech recognition | speech processing | speech processing | imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | MRI | MRI | ultrasound | ultrasound | ECG | ECG | electrocardiogram | electrocardiogram | fourier | fourier | FFT | FFT | applications of probabilitym | applications of probabilitym | noise | noise | MATLAB | MATLAB | digital filter | digital filter | DSP | DSP

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-HST.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

BE.453J Biomedical Information Technology (MIT) BE.453J Biomedical Information Technology (MIT)

Description

The objective of this subject is to teach the design of contemporary information systems for biological and medical data. These data are growing at a prodigious rate, and new information systems are required. This subject will cover examples from biology and medicine to illustrate complete life cycle information systems, beginning with data acquisition, following to data storage and finally to retrieval and analysis. Design of appropriate databases, client-server strategies, data interchange protocols, and computational modeling architectures will be covered. Students are expected to have some familiarity with scientific application software and a basic understanding of at least one contemporary programming language (C, C++, Java®, Lisp, Perl, Python, etc.). A major term project is The objective of this subject is to teach the design of contemporary information systems for biological and medical data. These data are growing at a prodigious rate, and new information systems are required. This subject will cover examples from biology and medicine to illustrate complete life cycle information systems, beginning with data acquisition, following to data storage and finally to retrieval and analysis. Design of appropriate databases, client-server strategies, data interchange protocols, and computational modeling architectures will be covered. Students are expected to have some familiarity with scientific application software and a basic understanding of at least one contemporary programming language (C, C++, Java®, Lisp, Perl, Python, etc.). A major term project is

Subjects

imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | metadata | metadata | medical record | medical record | DICOM | DICOM | computer architecture | computer architecture | client-server architecture | client-server architecture | SEM | SEM | TEM | TEM | OME | OME | RDF | RDF | semantic web | semantic web | BioHaystack | BioHaystack | database | database | schema | schema | ExperiBase | ExperiBase | genomics | genomics | proteomics | proteomics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | clinical decision support | clinical decision support | microarray | microarray | gel electrophoresis | gel electrophoresis | diagnosis | diagnosis | 2.771J | 2.771J | 2.771 | 2.771 | HST.958J | HST.958J | HST.958 | HST.958

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

HST.035 Principle and Practice of Human Pathology (MIT) HST.035 Principle and Practice of Human Pathology (MIT)

Description

This course provides a comprehensive overview of human pathology with emphasis on mechanisms of disease and diagnostic medicine. Topics include:Cellular Mechanisms of DiseaseMolecular PathologyPathology of Major Organ SystemsReview of Diagnostic Tools from Traditional Surgical Pathology to Diagnostic SpectroscopyFunctional and Molecular ImagingMolecular DiagnosticsIn addition to lectures, one of the two weekly sessions includes a 2-3 hour laboratory component. Periodically, time will also be devoted to minicases.LecturersProf. Jon AsterProf. Frederick BieberProf. Carlo BrugnaraProf. Robert B. ColvinProf. Christopher CrumProf. Douglas DockeryProf. Mel FeanyProf. Michael FeldProf. Jonathan FletcherProf. Michael GimbroneProf. Todd GolubProf. Frank B. HuProf. Donald IngberProf. Hart LidovProf. This course provides a comprehensive overview of human pathology with emphasis on mechanisms of disease and diagnostic medicine. Topics include:Cellular Mechanisms of DiseaseMolecular PathologyPathology of Major Organ SystemsReview of Diagnostic Tools from Traditional Surgical Pathology to Diagnostic SpectroscopyFunctional and Molecular ImagingMolecular DiagnosticsIn addition to lectures, one of the two weekly sessions includes a 2-3 hour laboratory component. Periodically, time will also be devoted to minicases.LecturersProf. Jon AsterProf. Frederick BieberProf. Carlo BrugnaraProf. Robert B. ColvinProf. Christopher CrumProf. Douglas DockeryProf. Mel FeanyProf. Michael FeldProf. Jonathan FletcherProf. Michael GimbroneProf. Todd GolubProf. Frank B. HuProf. Donald IngberProf. Hart LidovProf.

Subjects

human pathology | human pathology | disease mechanisms | disease mechanisms | cellular pathology | cellular pathology | molecular pathology | molecular pathology | diagnostic tools | diagnostic tools | surgical pathology | surgical pathology | diagnostic spectroscopy | diagnostic spectroscopy | functional imaging | functional imaging | molecular imaging | molecular imaging | molecular diagnostics | molecular diagnostics | medicine | medicine | immune system | immune system | transplantation | transplantation | diagnosis | diagnosis | neoplasia | neoplasia | pathobiology | pathobiology | pathophysiology | pathophysiology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-HST.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | imaging | imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | impluse | impluse | brain imaging | brain imaging | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | mental focus | mental focus | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Waves and Imaging (MIT)

Description

This class covers the mathematics of inverse problems involving waves, with examples taken from reflection seismology, synthetic aperture radar, and computerized tomography.

Subjects

waves | imaging | radar imaging | seismic imaging | Radon transform | backprojection | reflection seismology | computerized tomography | synthetic aperture radar

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.717J Optical Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course concerns the theory and practice of optical methods in engineering and system design, with an emphasis on diffraction, statistical optics, holography, and imaging. It provides the engineering methodology skills necessary to incorporate optical components in systems serving diverse areas such as precision engineering and metrology, bio-imaging, and computing (sensors, data storage, communication in multi-processor systems). Experimental demonstrations and a design project are included.

Subjects

optical methods in engineering and system design | diffraction | statistical optics | holography | and imaging | Statistical Optics | Inverse Problems (i.e. theory of imaging) | applications in precision engineering and metrology | bio-imaging | and computing (sensors | data storage | communication in multi-processor systems) | Fourier optics | probability | stochastic processes | light statistics | theory of light coherence | van Cittert-Zernicke Theorem | statistical optics applications | inverse problems | information-theoretic views | information theory | 2.717 | MAS.857

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.717J Optical Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course concerns the theory and practice of optical methods in engineering and system design, with an emphasis on diffraction, statistical optics, holography, and imaging. It provides the engineering methodology skills necessary to incorporate optical components in systems serving diverse areas such as precision engineering and metrology, bio-imaging, and computing (sensors, data storage, communication in multi-processor systems). Experimental demonstrations and a design project are included.

Subjects

optical methods in engineering and system design | diffraction | statistical optics | holography | and imaging | Statistical Optics | Inverse Problems (i.e. theory of imaging) | applications in precision engineering and metrology | bio-imaging | and computing (sensors | data storage | communication in multi-processor systems) | Fourier optics | probability | stochastic processes | light statistics | theory of light coherence | van Cittert-Zernicke Theorem | statistical optics applications | inverse problems | information-theoretic views | information theory | 2.717 | MAS.857

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team-taught multidisciplinary course provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. It begins with in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include: fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, and building and applying statistical models for fMRI data; and human subject issues including informed consent, institutional review board requirements and safety in the high field environment. Additional Facul

Subjects

medical imaging | medical lab | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | MRI | fMRI | signal processing | human brain mapping | function | image formation physics | metabolism | psychology | physiology | image signals | image processing | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | neurology | functional data analysis | experimental design | statistical models | human subjects | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | safety | medical | brain scan | brain imaging | DTI | vision

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

22.058 Principles of Medical Imaging (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging and its applications. It includes a series of lectures with a parallel set of recitations that provide demonstrations of basic principles. Both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation are covered, including x-ray, PET, MRI, and ultrasound. Emphasis on the physics and engineering of image formation.

Subjects

general imaging principles | | linear optics | | ray tracing | | Linear Imaging Systems | | Space Invariance | | Pin-hole camera | | Fourier Transformations | | Modulation Transfer Functions | | Fourier convolution | | Sampling | | Nyquist | | counting statistics | | additive noise | | optical imaging | | Radiation types | | Radiation detection | | photon detection | | spectra | | attenuation | | Planar X-ray imaging | | Projective Imaging | | X-ray CT | | Ultrasound | | microscopy | k-space | | NMR pulses | | f2-D gradient | | spin echoes | | 3-D methods of MRI | | volume localized spectroscopy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.341 Brightening up Life: Harnessing the Power of Fluorescence Imaging to Observe Biology in Action (MIT)

Description

One summer in the 1960s a young Japanese researcher, with the help of a few high school students, chopped up ten thousand jellyfish. As a by-product of this harvest, they isolated a green fluorescent protein (GFP). Since then, GFP has triggered a revolution in our understanding of gene expression and signaling in live cells. In this seminar, we will examine how this small protein generates fluorescence, i.e. absorbs light of one wavelength and emits light of a longer wavelength. We will discuss how the color palette has been extended from green to blue, red and many other colors, based on protein engineering of GFP and the study of vividly colorful coral reefs. We will then investigate how these fluorescent proteins can be used to track the motion of DNA, RNA and protein in living cells, a

Subjects

Green Fluorescent Protein | Fluorescent protein engineering | Photoconversion | fluorescent protein variants | fluorescent microscopy facility | Quantitative fluorescent imaging | ultra-sensitive fluorescent imaging | high-throughput analysis | Fluorescent imaging in living organisms | phycoerythrin | phytochrome | jellyfish | red fluorescent protein | photoactivation | chromophore | protonation | lysosomes | recombinant protein molecules

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata