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21H.221 The Places of Migration in United States History (MIT) 21H.221 The Places of Migration in United States History (MIT)

Description

This course examines the history of the United States as a "nation of immigrants" within a broader global context. It considers migration from the mid-19th century to the present through case studies of such places as New York's Lower East Side, South Texas, Florida, and San Francisco's Chinatown. It also examines the role of memory, media, and popular culture in shaping ideas about migration. The course includes optional field trip to New York City. This course examines the history of the United States as a "nation of immigrants" within a broader global context. It considers migration from the mid-19th century to the present through case studies of such places as New York's Lower East Side, South Texas, Florida, and San Francisco's Chinatown. It also examines the role of memory, media, and popular culture in shaping ideas about migration. The course includes optional field trip to New York City.

Subjects

immigration | immigration | migration | migration | lawrence | lawrence | chinatown | chinatown | U.S.-Mexico border | U.S.-Mexico border | Great Migration | Great Migration | The Jazz Singer | The Jazz Singer | Lower East Side | Lower East Side | ethnicity | ethnicity | New York City | New York City | New Immigration | New Immigration | Filipino | Filipino | american imperialism | american imperialism | cuban-american | cuban-american | multiculturalism | multiculturalism | caribbean migration | caribbean migration | asian immigration | asian immigration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT) 21G.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence. An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence.

Subjects

asian immigration | asian immigration | chinese problem | chinese problem | anti-asian movements | anti-asian movements | WWII | WWII | new wave immigration | new wave immigration | racism | racism | affirmative action | affirmative action | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | Chinatown | Chinatown | panethnicity | panethnicity | memoir | memoir | chinese exlucsion | chinese exlucsion | U.S. imperialism | U.S. imperialism | Philippines | Philippines | japanese-american internment | japanese-american internment | diaspora | diaspora

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.20 Introduction to American Politics (MIT) 17.20 Introduction to American Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides a substantive overview of U.S. politics and an introduction to the discipline of political science. It surveys the institutional foundations of U.S. politics as well as the activities of political elites, organizations, and ordinary citizens. It also explores the application of general political science concepts and analytic frameworks to specific episodes and phenomena in U.S. politics. This course provides a substantive overview of U.S. politics and an introduction to the discipline of political science. It surveys the institutional foundations of U.S. politics as well as the activities of political elites, organizations, and ordinary citizens. It also explores the application of general political science concepts and analytic frameworks to specific episodes and phenomena in U.S. politics.

Subjects

American politics | American politics | The Constitution | The Constitution | politicians | politicians | Congress | Congress | the Presidency | the Presidency | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | judiciary | judiciary | federalism | federalism | public opinion | public opinion | political parties | political parties | partisanship | partisanship | choice | choice | campaigns | campaigns | elections | elections | policy | policy | political geography | political geography | polarization | polarization | extremism | extremism | organized interests | organized interests | economic inequality | economic inequality | race | race | immigration | immigration | multiculturalism | multiculturalism

License

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21H.235 Metropolis: History of New York City (MIT) 21H.235 Metropolis: History of New York City (MIT)

Description

Hitherto it had gone by the original Indian name Manna-hatta, or as some still have it, 'The Manhattoes'; but this was now decried as savage and heathenish... At length, when the council was almost in despair, a burgher, remarkable for the size and squareness of his head, proposed that they should call it New-Amsterdam. The proposition took every body by surprise; it was so striking, so apposite, so ingenious. The name was adopted by acclamation, and New-Amsterdam the metropolis was thenceforth called. —Washington Irving, 1808 In less tongue-in-cheek style, this course examines the evolution of New York City from 1607 to the present. The readings focus on the city's social and physical histories, and the class discussions compare New York's development to patterns in other citie Hitherto it had gone by the original Indian name Manna-hatta, or as some still have it, 'The Manhattoes'; but this was now decried as savage and heathenish... At length, when the council was almost in despair, a burgher, remarkable for the size and squareness of his head, proposed that they should call it New-Amsterdam. The proposition took every body by surprise; it was so striking, so apposite, so ingenious. The name was adopted by acclamation, and New-Amsterdam the metropolis was thenceforth called. —Washington Irving, 1808 In less tongue-in-cheek style, this course examines the evolution of New York City from 1607 to the present. The readings focus on the city's social and physical histories, and the class discussions compare New York's development to patterns in other citie

Subjects

New York City | New York City | metropolis | metropolis | Harlem | Harlem | Bronx | Bronx | Brooklyn | Brooklyn | Queens | Queens | Long Island | Long Island | Manhattan | Manhattan | gay society | gay society | New Amsterdam | New Amsterdam | working class | working class | Haudenosaunee | Haudenosaunee | sex work | sex work | Chinatown | Chinatown | Tammany Hall | Tammany Hall | race relations | race relations | Civil War | Civil War | immigration | immigration | organized crime | organized crime | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | urban planning | urban planning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT) 14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT)

Description

Neoclassical analysis of the labor market and its institutions. A systematic development of the theory of labor supply, labor demand, and human capital. Topics discussed also include wage and employment determination, turnover, search, immigration, unemployment, equalizing differences, and institutions in the labor market. There is particular emphasis on the interaction of theoretical and empirical modeling and the development of independent research interests. Neoclassical analysis of the labor market and its institutions. A systematic development of the theory of labor supply, labor demand, and human capital. Topics discussed also include wage and employment determination, turnover, search, immigration, unemployment, equalizing differences, and institutions in the labor market. There is particular emphasis on the interaction of theoretical and empirical modeling and the development of independent research interests.

Subjects

labor economics | public policy | schooling | learning | matching | experience | wages | minimum wage | college | investment | training | firms | corporations | labor | unions | panel data | neoclassical model | turnover models | turnover | economics | labor economics | public policy | schooling | learning | matching | experience | wages | minimum wage | college | investment | training | firms | corporations | labor | unions | panel data | neoclassical model | turnover models | turnover | economics | labor | labor | market | market | statistics | statistics | theory | theory | neoclassical | neoclassical | supply | supply | model | model | life-cycle | life-cycle | demand | demand | wages | wages | immigration | immigration | human capital | human capital | econometrics | econometrics | liquidity | liquidity | constraints | constraints | mobility | mobility | incentives | incentives | organization | organization | moral hazard | moral hazard | insurance | insurance | investments | investments | efficiency | efficiency | unemployment | unemployment | search | search | jobs | jobs | training | training | capital | capital | firm | firm | technology | technology | skills | skills | risk | risk | signaling | signaling | discrimination | discrimination | self-selection | self-selection | learning | learning | natives | natives

License

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14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT) 14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT)

Description

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with traditional topics in labor economics and to encourage the development of independent research interests. We will cover a systematic development of the theory of labor supply, labor demand, and human capital. Topics include wage and employment determination, turnover, search, immigration, unemployment, equalizing differences, and institutions in the labor market. There will be particular emphasis on the interaction between theoretical and empirical modeling. The aim of this course is to acquaint students with traditional topics in labor economics and to encourage the development of independent research interests. We will cover a systematic development of the theory of labor supply, labor demand, and human capital. Topics include wage and employment determination, turnover, search, immigration, unemployment, equalizing differences, and institutions in the labor market. There will be particular emphasis on the interaction between theoretical and empirical modeling.

Subjects

labor economics | labor economics | public policy | public policy | immigration | immigration | human capital | human capital | econometrics | econometrics | minimum wage | minimum wage | public education | public education | job training | job training | labor | labor | unions | unions | neoclassical model | neoclassical model | life-cycle | life-cycle | insurance | insurance | unemployment | unemployment | signaling | signaling

License

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14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT) 14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment. This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment.

Subjects

labor Economics | labor Economics | public policy | public policy | applied microeconomics | applied microeconomics | empirical analysis | empirical analysis | labor supply and demand | labor supply and demand | taxes and transfers | taxes and transfers | human capital | human capital | minimum wages | minimum wages | income distribution | income distribution | unions and strikes | unions and strikes | immigration | immigration | incentives | incentives | discrimination | discrimination | unemployment and unemployment insurance | unemployment and unemployment insurance | bargaining | bargaining | economics of the family | economics of the family | decision to work | decision to work | home production | home production | monpsony | monpsony | education | education | training | training

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Three asylum paradigms

Description

Public Seminar Series, Hilary term 2014. Seminar by Jean-François Durieux (RSC and the Graduate Institute, Geneva) recorded on 12 February 2014 at the Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford. What special sense of duty connects us to those people whom we call refugees, and how does this duty translate into asylum? What does the practice of asylum tell us about who we are, as individuals as well as members of political communities? How does one morally justify the special concern we feel for, and consequently the privileged treatment we give, refugees as compared with other foreigners in need? Revisiting the main features of the ethical debate over asylum and refugeehood, Mr Durieux argues that there cannot be one coherent set of answers to these questions, be Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

refugee | law | politics | asylum | immigration | migration | 1951 convention | refugee | law | politics | asylum | immigration | migration | 1951 convention | 2014-02-12

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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More migrants, fewer rights?: How shall we balance openness and rights in labour immigration policy?

Description

Martin Ruhs, COMPAS, University of Oxford, gives a talk for the COMPAS Breakfast Breifing series Many low-income countries and development organisations are calling for greater liberalization of labor immigration policies in high-income countries. At the same time, human rights organisations and migrant rights advocates demand more equal rights for migrant workers. The Price of Rights, a new book by COMPAS economist Martin Ruhs, shows why you cannot always have both. Examining labor immigration policies in over forty countries, as well as policy drivers in major migrant-receiving and migrant-sending states, Martin Ruhs finds that there are trade-offs in the policies of high-income countries between openness to admitting migrant workers and some of the rights granted to migrants after admis Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

migration | UK Migration | human rights | labour immigration | labour | politics | migration | UK Migration | human rights | labour immigration | labour | politics | 2013-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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What are the social and public service impacts of international migration at the local level?

Description

Jon Simmons, Home Office Migration and Border Analysis, gives a talk for the COMPAS Breaskfast Breifing series This briefing summarises research and analysis conducted by Home Office Science to provide further evidence on the social and public service impacts of migration at the local level. It examines migrant composition and impacts at the local, rather than the national, level. It presents a local authority typology, classifying all local authorities within England and Wales into twelve discrete groups, on the basis of key migration and socio-economic indicators, including the different migrant types (e.g. workers, students) and nationalities of migrants they have recently received. Additionally, the research examines impacts of different types of migrant, rather than focusing on migra Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

migration | immigration | politics | compas | society | migration | immigration | politics | compas | society | 2013-09-27

License

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21H.952J Readings in American History Since 1877 (MIT) 21H.952J Readings in American History Since 1877 (MIT)

Description

This seminar aims to develop a teaching knowledge of the field through extensive reading and discussion of major works. The reading covers a broad range of topics - political, economic, social, and cultural - and represents a variety of historical methods. This seminar aims to develop a teaching knowledge of the field through extensive reading and discussion of major works. The reading covers a broad range of topics - political, economic, social, and cultural - and represents a variety of historical methods.

Subjects

united states | united states | history | history | contemporary | contemporary | post-reconstruction | post-reconstruction | literature | literature | twentieth century | twentieth century | nineteen century | nineteen century | immigration | immigration | urbanization | urbanization | populism | populism | progressivism | progressivism | modern american culture | modern american culture | depression | depression | world war | world war | new dea | new dea | politics | politics | new deal | new deal | american history | american history | political | political | culture | culture | cultural | cultural | social | social | economic | economic | 21H.952 | 21H.952 | STS.410 | STS.410

License

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24.04J Justice (MIT) 24.04J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the ideal of social justice. What makes a society just? We will approach this question by studying three opposing theories of justice—utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism—each foundational to contemporary political thought and discourse. This course explores the ideal of social justice. What makes a society just? We will approach this question by studying three opposing theories of justice—utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism—each foundational to contemporary political thought and discourse.

Subjects

social justice | social justice | liberty | liberty | equality | equality | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | entitlement | entitlement | immigration | immigration | fairness | fairness | ghetto poor | ghetto poor | global poor | global poor | principles | principles | moral desert | moral desert | welfare contractualism | welfare contractualism | G.A. Cohen | G.A. Cohen | Jeremy Bentham | Jeremy Bentham | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | Robert Nozick | Robert Nozick | Milton Friedman | Milton Friedman

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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US Government Illegally Deporting US Citizens

Description

Dr Jacqueline Stevens gives a talk on the United States' practice of illegally deporting its citizens as part of the Theory and Practice of Immigration Detention Workshop. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

asylum | citizenship | immigration | america | society | law | detention centres | asylum | citizenship | immigration | america | society | law | detention centres

License

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Human rights and the Elusive Universal Subject: Detention of Asylum Seekers and Irregular Entrants under IHRL and EU Law

Description

Cathryn Costello, Fellow and Tutor in EU and Public Law gives a talk for the Workshop on the Theory and Practice of Immigration Detention. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | law | justice | immigration | detention | asylum | international law | europe | law | justice | immigration | detention | asylum | international law

License

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21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT) 21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a

Subjects

criminal justice | criminal justice | citizenship | citizenship | nationhood | nationhood | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | religion | religion | mass incarceration | mass incarceration | poverty | poverty | class | class | criminal punishment | criminal punishment | death penalty | death penalty | drug laws | drug laws | police | police | terrorism | terrorism | counter-terrorism | counter-terrorism | 9/11 | 9/11 | Ferguson | Ferguson | Michael Brown | Michael Brown | Trayvon Martin | Trayvon Martin | Jim Crow | Jim Crow | felon disenfranchisement | felon disenfranchisement | plea bargaining | plea bargaining | George Zimmerman | George Zimmerman | militarization | militarization | guilt | guilt | innocence | innocence | illegal alien | illegal alien | undocumented | undocumented | immigration | immigration | deportation | deportation | civil liberties | civil liberties | internment | internment | Japanese | Japanese | WWII | WWII | police brutality | police brutality

License

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WGS.640 Gender, Race, and the Construction of the American West (MIT) WGS.640 Gender, Race, and the Construction of the American West (MIT)

Description

This course explores how gender shaped the historical experiences and cultural productions in the North American West during the time it was being explored, settled, and imagined. The North American West of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries provides a fascinating case study of the shifting meanings of gender, race, citizenship, and power in border societies. As the site of migration, settlement, and displacement, it spawned contests over land, labor disputes, inter-ethnic conflicts and peaceful relations, and many kinds of cultural productions. The Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies (GCWS) This course is part of the Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies. The GCWS at MIT brings together scholars and teachers at nine degree-granting institutions in the Boston area who This course explores how gender shaped the historical experiences and cultural productions in the North American West during the time it was being explored, settled, and imagined. The North American West of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries provides a fascinating case study of the shifting meanings of gender, race, citizenship, and power in border societies. As the site of migration, settlement, and displacement, it spawned contests over land, labor disputes, inter-ethnic conflicts and peaceful relations, and many kinds of cultural productions. The Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies (GCWS) This course is part of the Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies. The GCWS at MIT brings together scholars and teachers at nine degree-granting institutions in the Boston area who

Subjects

gender | gender | race | race | American west | American west | frontier | frontier | Great Plains | Great Plains | Borderlands | Borderlands | sexuality | sexuality | immigration | immigration | migration | migration | labor | labor | politics | politics | reform | reform | Great Depression | Great Depression | WWII | WWII | Georgia O'Keefe | Georgia O'Keefe

License

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Migration research at Oxford: Dr Evelyn Ersanilli

Description

In this podcast Farhan Samanani interviews MSc Migration Studies lecturer Dr Evelyn Ersanilli to find out more about her research, and the advantages of studying migration and working at the University of Oxford. The discussion includes Evelyn's research interests, some interesting aspects of her work and research, and some insights about working at Oxford. Evelyn Ersanilli is a Departmental Lecturer in Migration Studies at the Department of International Development (QEH). She holds an MSc in Interdisciplinary Social Science (Utrecht University, the Netherlands) and a PhD in Sociology (VU University Amsterdam, the Netherlands). Previously she worked as a post-doc at the Social Science Research Centre (WZB) in Berlin and the International Migration Institute in Oxford. Evelyn's research Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

MSc Migration Studies | economics | migration | migration studies | immigration | MSc Migration Studies | economics | migration | migration studies | immigration

License

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Turning wrongful convictions into rights? Asylum seekers and the criminal law

Description

Public Seminar Series, Hilary term 2014. Seminar by Dr Ana Aliverti (Warwick School of Law) recorded on 29 January 2014 at the Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford. Fifteen years have passed since the High Court delivered the ground-breaking decision in Adimi [1999], in which Lord Justice Brown called attention to the scarce observance of Article 31 of the Refugee Convention in domestic criminal proceedings against asylum seekers arriving in Britain, or en route to another country, without proper documents. In response to the judgment, the British Parliament incorporated section 31 in the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999, providing for a defence for refugees against certain criminal charges under a number of conditions. While the then Attorney General stated Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

refugee | immigration | asylum seekers | law | politics | refugee | immigration | asylum seekers | law | politics

License

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21G.S01 Modern Mexico: Representations of Mexico City's Urban Life (MIT) 21G.S01 Modern Mexico: Representations of Mexico City's Urban Life (MIT)

Description

The goal of this course is to offer a general introduction to 20th and 21st century literature and cultural production about Modern Mexico. Emphasis will be placed on the way intellectuals and artists have presented the changes in Mexico City's urban life, and how these representations question themes and trends in national identity, state control, globalization, and immigration. The goal of this course is to offer a general introduction to 20th and 21st century literature and cultural production about Modern Mexico. Emphasis will be placed on the way intellectuals and artists have presented the changes in Mexico City's urban life, and how these representations question themes and trends in national identity, state control, globalization, and immigration.

Subjects

Mexico | Mexico | Mexico City | Mexico City | urban | urban | literature | literature | visual arts | visual arts | film | film | culture | culture | modern history | modern history | 20th century | 20th century | 21st century | 21st century | national identity | national identity | state control | state control | globalization | globalization | immigration | immigration

License

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Rethinking impact with social media

Description

Oxford-based researcher Nando Sigona started his blog "Postcards from..." in 2008. Since then his use of social media has expanded into Twitter and Podcasting to engage wider communities in his research on migration, asylum and minority issues. Nando presents on what he does and why it works. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

social media | podcasting | twitter | immigration | research | papers | oxford | asylum | blogging | social media | podcasting | twitter | immigration | research | papers | oxford | asylum | blogging | 2012-11-09

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT) 14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT)

Description

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with traditional topics in labor economics and to encourage the development of independent research interests. This course is taught in two parts: Fall term and then in the subsequent Fall term. The aim of this course is to acquaint students with traditional topics in labor economics and to encourage the development of independent research interests. This course is taught in two parts: Fall term and then in the subsequent Fall term.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | labor | labor | market | market | statistics | statistics | theory | theory | neoclassical | neoclassical | supply | supply | model | model | life-cycle | life-cycle | demand | demand | wages | wages | immigration | immigration | human capital | human capital | econometrics | econometrics | liquidity | liquidity | constraints | constraints | mobility | mobility | incentives | incentives | organization | organization | moral hazard | moral hazard | insurance | insurance | investments | investments | efficiency | efficiency | unemployment | unemployment | search | search | jobs | jobs | training | training | capital | capital | firm | firm | technology | technology | skills | skills | risk | risk | signaling | signaling | discrimination | discrimination | self-selection | self-selection | learning | learning | natives | natives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.139 The City in Film (MIT) 11.139 The City in Film (MIT)

Description

Using film as a lens to explore and interpret various aspects of the urban experience in both the U.S. and abroad, this course presents a survey of important developments in urbanism from 1900 to the present day, including changes in technology, bureaucracy, and industrialization; immigration and national identity; race, class, gender, and economic inequality; politics, conformity, and urban anomie; and planning, development, private property, displacement, sprawl, environmental degradation, and suburbanization. Using film as a lens to explore and interpret various aspects of the urban experience in both the U.S. and abroad, this course presents a survey of important developments in urbanism from 1900 to the present day, including changes in technology, bureaucracy, and industrialization; immigration and national identity; race, class, gender, and economic inequality; politics, conformity, and urban anomie; and planning, development, private property, displacement, sprawl, environmental degradation, and suburbanization.

Subjects

cities | cities | urban | urban | urban experience | urban experience | urbanism | urbanism | development | development | technology | technology | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | industrialization | industrialization | immigration | immigration | national identity | national identity | race | race | class | class | gender | gender | economic inequality | economic inequality | politics | politics | conformity | conformity | urban anomie | urban anomie | planning | planning | private property | private property | displacement | displacement | sprawl | sprawl | environmental degradation | environmental degradation | suburbanization | suburbanization | metropolis | metropolis | berlin symphony of a great city | berlin symphony of a great city | the crowd | the crowd | modern times | modern times | ladri di biciclette | ladri di biciclette | bicycle thieves | bicycle thieves | the naked city | the naked city | west side story | west side story | play time | play time | midnight cowboy | midnight cowboy | blade runner | blade runner | do the right thing | do the right thing | london | london | night on earth | night on earth

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.346 Topics in Modern French Literature and Culture: Global Paris (MIT) 21G.346 Topics in Modern French Literature and Culture: Global Paris (MIT)

Description

This course investigates Paris's oversized status as a global capital by looking at the events, transformations, cultures, and arts for which the city is known to help us better understand Paris and its place in French and global cultures today. Taught in French. This course investigates Paris's oversized status as a global capital by looking at the events, transformations, cultures, and arts for which the city is known to help us better understand Paris and its place in French and global cultures today. Taught in French.

Subjects

France | France | Paris | Paris | City of Light | City of Light | City of Love | City of Love | Capital of the Ninteenth Century | Capital of the Ninteenth Century | Capital of Modernity | Capital of Modernity | global capital | global capital | immigrants | immigrants | immigration | immigration | Paris myth | Paris myth | Bollywood | Bollywood | Las Vegas | Las Vegas | Eiffel Tower | Eiffel Tower | la tour Eiffel | la tour Eiffel | Gustave Eiffel | Gustave Eiffel | culture | culture | Zola | Zola | Barthes | Barthes | Les Halles | Les Halles | Napoleon | Napoleon | rebuilding Paris | rebuilding Paris | Rio De Janeiro | Rio De Janeiro | petits paris | petits paris | Musée du quai Branly | Musée du quai Branly | Hollywood | Hollywood | La banlieue de Paris | La banlieue de Paris | La cuisine asiatique | La cuisine asiatique | Bemelmans | Bemelmans | Madeline | Madeline | Babar | Babar

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Neoliberal Construction of Modern Slavery: The Case of Migrant Domestic Workers

Description

Judy Fudge, Professor of Law, Kent Law School, University of Kent examines Modern Slavery as a causal effect of the emphasis on human trafficking, anti-immigration and criminal law rather than employment law for migrant domestic workers. Professor Fudge examines Modern Slavery as a causal effect of the emphasis on human trafficking, anti-immigration and criminal law rather than employment law for migrant domestic workers at the Neoliberalism, Employment and the Law workshop at Wolfson College, Oxford, hosted the Foundation for Law, Justice and Society in November 2015. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

policy | migration | immigration | domestic workers | modern slavery | neoliberalism | migrant | abuse | law | regulation | Employment | legal | policy | migration | immigration | domestic workers | modern slavery | neoliberalism | migrant | abuse | law | regulation | Employment | legal | 2015-11-19

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21W.742J Writing About Race: Narratives of Multiraciality (MIT) 21W.742J Writing About Race: Narratives of Multiraciality (MIT)

Description

In this course we will read essays, novels, memoirs, and graphic texts, and view documentary and experimental films and videos which explore race from the standpoint of the multiracial. Examining the varied work of multiracial authors and filmmakers such as Danzy Senna, Ruth Ozeki, Kip Fulbeck, James McBride and others, we will focus not on how multiracial people are seen or imagined by the dominant culture, but instead on how they represent themselves. How do these authors approach issues of family, community, nation, language and history? What can their work tell us about the complex interconnections between race, gender, class, sexuality, and citizenship? Is there a relationship between their experiences of multiraciality and a willingness to experiment with form and genre? In addressin In this course we will read essays, novels, memoirs, and graphic texts, and view documentary and experimental films and videos which explore race from the standpoint of the multiracial. Examining the varied work of multiracial authors and filmmakers such as Danzy Senna, Ruth Ozeki, Kip Fulbeck, James McBride and others, we will focus not on how multiracial people are seen or imagined by the dominant culture, but instead on how they represent themselves. How do these authors approach issues of family, community, nation, language and history? What can their work tell us about the complex interconnections between race, gender, class, sexuality, and citizenship? Is there a relationship between their experiences of multiraciality and a willingness to experiment with form and genre? In addressin

Subjects

21W.742 | 21W.742 | WGS.231 | WGS.231 | multiracial | multiracial | multi-race | multi-race | mixed-race | mixed-race | multiraciality | multiraciality | multiple descent | multiple descent | hybrid populations | hybrid populations | mixed ancestry | mixed ancestry | race | race | assimilation | assimilation | integration | integration | ethnicity | ethnicity | identity | identity | self | self | heritage | heritage | multicultural | multicultural | mixed heritage | mixed heritage | mulato | mulato | mestizo | mestizo | oppression | oppression | immigration | immigration | diaspora | diaspora | racism | racism | sterotype | sterotype | family | family | cultural studies | cultural studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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