Searching for immunology : 66 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3

Immunology basics

Description

Learning. Important Copyright Information: All images, tables and figures in this resource were reproduced from 'Lecture Notes Immunology' April 2010, 6th Edition, published by Wiley-Blackwell and with full permission of the co-author and faculty member, Dr Ian Todd. No image, table or figure in this resource can be reproduced without prior permission from publishers Wiley-Blackwell.

Subjects

ukoer | immunology | immunology basics | introduction to immunology | recognition of extracellular pathogens | defence against extracellular pathogens | t cell-mediated immunity | helper t cells and cytokines | immunity to viruses | Subjects allied to medicine | B000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

HIV and children in Africa

Description

Professor Sarah Rowland-Jones tells us about her work on HIV with children in Africa. Prof. Sarah Rowland-Jones' work mainly focuses on anti-viral immunity, and in particular how immune responses modify the outcome of HIV infection. Her research aims to contribute to the design of vaccines and immunotherapies against HIV infection, including HIV-2 infection, in developing countries where an effective vaccine is desperately needed. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Africa | T cells | HIV-2 | HIV-1 | infant immunology | immunity | Africa | T cells | HIV-2 | HIV-1 | infant immunology | immunity

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Tropical Medicine in Kenya

Description

Professor Kevin Marsh tells us about his research on Tropical Medicine in Kenya. Prof. Kevin Marsh has a broad research interest in child health in the tropics, with a particular focus in the immune epidemiology of malaria. Prof. Marsh is director of the KEMRI Wellcome Programme in Kenya; he also coordinates the malaria immunology group within the programme. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Global health | Epidemiology | immunology | malaria | Global health | Epidemiology | immunology | malaria

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Cancer and Protein Crystallography

Description

Professor Yvonne Jones talks about cell-cell communication and how this can help us develop new drugs. Prof. Yvonne Jones is director of the Cancer Research UK Receptor Structure Research Group. Her research focuses on the structural biology of cell surface recognition and signalling complexes. Receptors embedded in the surface are potential targets for therapeutic intervention in many diseases including cancer. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

protein-protein interaction | tumour immunology | signalling complexes | x-ray crystallography | structural biology | protein-protein interaction | tumour immunology | signalling complexes | x-ray crystallography | structural biology

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Proteomics and Biomarkers

Description

Dr Benedikt Kessler tells us how proteomics helps find biomarkers. In most living organisms, the ubiquitin-proteasome system is responsible for the degradation of proteins, either because they're damaged or they reach the end of their life span. Ubiquitin marks a protein for elimination. Alterations in this process are responsible for many human diseases. Dr Benedikt Kessler studies the role of deubiquitylating enzymes that remove ubiquitin from substrate proteins. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

immunology | hiv | proteomics | Biomarkers | infectious diseases | ubiquitin | immunology | hiv | proteomics | Biomarkers | infectious diseases | ubiquitin

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Spondyloarthritis

Description

Dr Paul Bowness tells us about his work on spondyloarthritis. Dr Paul Bownessis works on Ankylosing Spondylitis, the commonest form of spondyloarthritis. This rheumatic disease seems to be caused by an overacting immune system. It has a major genetic component: at least 5-10 genes are known to contribute the disease, with HLA-B27 being by far the most important. Dr Bowness studies how these genes work in the immune systems of both healthy people and patients with arthritis. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

lymphocytes | ankylosing spondylitis | immunology | spondyloarthritis | lymphocytes | ankylosing spondylitis | immunology | spondyloarthritis

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.345 Evolution of the Immune System (MIT) 7.345 Evolution of the Immune System (MIT)

Description

In this course, evolutionary pathways that have led to the development of innate and adaptive immunity are analyzed, the conserved and unique features of the immune response from bacteria to higher vertebrates is traced, and factors, such as adaptive changes in pathogens that have shaped the evolution of immune system are identified.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. In this course, evolutionary pathways that have led to the development of innate and adaptive immunity are analyzed, the conserved and unique features of the immune response from bacteria to higher vertebrates is traced, and factors, such as adaptive changes in pathogens that have shaped the evolution of immune system are identified.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting.

Subjects

immune system | immune system | immunology | immunology | evolution of immune system | evolution of immune system | immune defence | immune defence | phagocytosis | phagocytosis | innate immunity | innate immunity | adaptive immunity | adaptive immunity | immunological memory | immunological memory | immune response | immune response | defence mechanisms | defence mechanisms | pathogens | pathogens | self discrimination | self discrimination | non-self discrimination | non-self discrimination | recognition | recognition | immune receptors | immune receptors | antigen | antigen

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.340 Immune Evasion: How Sneaky Pathogens Avoid Host Surveillance (MIT) 7.340 Immune Evasion: How Sneaky Pathogens Avoid Host Surveillance (MIT)

Description

Every infection consists of a battle between the invading pathogen and the resisting host. To be successful, a pathogen must escape the many defenses of the host immune system until it can replicate and spread to another host. A pathogen must prevent one of three stages of immune function: detection, activation, or effector function. Examples of disease-specific immune evasion and the mechanisms used by pathogens to prevail over their hosts' immune systems are discussed. Also considered is what these host-pathogen interactions reveal about the normal function of the immune system and basic cell biological processes, such as protein maturation and degradation. Every infection consists of a battle between the invading pathogen and the resisting host. To be successful, a pathogen must escape the many defenses of the host immune system until it can replicate and spread to another host. A pathogen must prevent one of three stages of immune function: detection, activation, or effector function. Examples of disease-specific immune evasion and the mechanisms used by pathogens to prevail over their hosts' immune systems are discussed. Also considered is what these host-pathogen interactions reveal about the normal function of the immune system and basic cell biological processes, such as protein maturation and degradation.

Subjects

immunology | immunology | immune system | immune system | immune evasion | immune evasion | pathogen | pathogen | effector function | effector function | infections | infections | Human cytomegalovirus | Human cytomegalovirus | Human Immunodeficiency Virus | Human Immunodeficiency Virus | CD4 cells | CD4 cells | CD8 cells | CD8 cells | T cells | T cells | surace receptors | surace receptors | cell lysis | cell lysis | host-pathogen interactions | host-pathogen interactions | host surveillance | host surveillance | antibodies | antibodies | MHC class I | MHC class I | blood-borne pathogens | blood-borne pathogens | macrophages | macrophages | phagocytosis | phagocytosis | endocytosis | endocytosis | degradation | degradation | antigen | antigen | apoptosis | apoptosis | cytokines | cytokines | immune response | immune response

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Sarah Rowland-Jones on HIV/AIDS

Description

Conrad Keating interviews Sarah Rowland-Jones, Professor of Immunology and Consultant Physician. The theme of her work is anti-viral immunity with a particular focus on how immune responses modify the outcome of HIV and other viral infections. Professor Rowland-Jones worked in Africa for more than a decade and was Director of MRC Unit in The Gambia. During the interview Professor Rowland-Jones talks about her work on HIV infection in Britain and in Africa, on why there are so few women in senior positions in Oxford clinical medicine and why she and her colleagues find working in the tropics such a fascinating experience. Keating begins his interview by asking Sarah Rowland-Jones what motivated her to make a career in tropical medicine... Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aids | immunology | hiv | tropical medicine | aids | immunology | hiv | tropical medicine

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129145/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer),

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | human biology | human biology | inherited diseases | inherited diseases | developmental biology | developmental biology | evolution | evolution | human genetics | human genetics | human diseases | human diseases | infectious agents | infectious agents | infectious diseases | infectious diseases

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer),

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | human biology | human biology | inherited diseases | inherited diseases | developmental biology | developmental biology | evolution | evolution | human genetics | human genetics | human diseases | human diseases | infectious agents | infectious agents | infectious diseases | infectious diseases

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.014 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.014 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.014 focuses on the application of these fundamental principles, toward an understanding of microorganisms as geochemical agents responsible for the evolution and renewal of the biosphere and of their role in human health The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.014 focuses on the application of these fundamental principles, toward an understanding of microorganisms as geochemical agents responsible for the evolution and renewal of the biosphere and of their role in human health

Subjects

microorganisms | microorganisms | geochemistry | geochemistry | geochemical agents | geochemical agents | biosphere | biosphere | bacterial genetics | bacterial genetics | carbon metabolism | carbon metabolism | energy metabolism | energy metabolism | productivity | productivity | biogeochemical cycles | biogeochemical cycles | molecular evolution | molecular evolution | population genetics | population genetics | evolution | evolution | population growth | population growth | biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | ecology | ecology | communities | communities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Adrian Hill on Vaccination Research

Description

Interview with Professor Adrian Hill, Director of the Jenner Institute for Vaccine Research in which he and student Richard Morton talk about the history of the Jenner Institute and the work currently being done to find TB, HIV and Malaria vaccines. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

immunology | malaria | hiv | Jenner Institute | vaccination | vaccine | immunology | malaria | hiv | Jenner Institute | vaccination | vaccine

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129109/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.012 Introduction to Biology (MIT) 7.012 Introduction to Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.012 focuses on the exploration of current research in cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, genomics, and molecular medicine.AcknowledgmentsThe study materials, problem sets, and quiz materials used during Fall 2004 for The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.012 focuses on the exploration of current research in cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, genomics, and molecular medicine.AcknowledgmentsThe study materials, problem sets, and quiz materials used during Fall 2004 for

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

20.106J Systems Microbiology (MIT) 20.106J Systems Microbiology (MIT)

Description

This course covers introductory microbiology from a systems perspective, considering microbial diversity, population dynamics, and genomics. Emphasis is placed on the delicate balance between microbes and humans, and the changes that result in the emergence of infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance. The case study approach covers such topics as vaccines, toxins, biodefense, and infections including Legionnaire’s disease, tuberculosis, Helicobacter pylori, and plague. This course covers introductory microbiology from a systems perspective, considering microbial diversity, population dynamics, and genomics. Emphasis is placed on the delicate balance between microbes and humans, and the changes that result in the emergence of infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance. The case study approach covers such topics as vaccines, toxins, biodefense, and infections including Legionnaire’s disease, tuberculosis, Helicobacter pylori, and plague.

Subjects

microbes | microbes | microbiology | microbiology | systems perspective | systems perspective | early earth | early earth | microbial evolution | microbial evolution | prokaryote | prokaryote | eukaryote | eukaryote | archaea | archaea | bacteria | bacteria | immunology | immunology | epidemiology | epidemiology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.012 Introduction to Biology (MIT) 7.012 Introduction to Biology (MIT)

Description

All three courses: 7.012, 7.013 and 7.014 cover the same core material which includes: the fundamental principles of biochemistry as they apply to introductory biology, genetics, molecular biology, basic recombinant DNA technology, and gene regulation.In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material, described below. Note: All three versions require a familiarity with some basic chemistry. For details, see the Chemistry Self-evaluation.7.012 focuses on cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, and includes an exploration into current research in cancer, genomics, and molecular medicine. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of cells, human genetics and diseases, infectious agents, cancer, immunology, molecular All three courses: 7.012, 7.013 and 7.014 cover the same core material which includes: the fundamental principles of biochemistry as they apply to introductory biology, genetics, molecular biology, basic recombinant DNA technology, and gene regulation.In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material, described below. Note: All three versions require a familiarity with some basic chemistry. For details, see the Chemistry Self-evaluation.7.012 focuses on cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, and includes an exploration into current research in cancer, genomics, and molecular medicine. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of cells, human genetics and diseases, infectious agents, cancer, immunology, molecular

Subjects

amino acids | amino acids | biochemistry | biochemistry | cancer | cancer | cell biology | cell biology | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | DNA | DNA | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | gene regulation | gene regulation | gene structure | gene structure | genetics | genetics | genomics | genomics | immunology | immunology | molecular biology | molecular biology | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | mRNA | mRNA | nervous system | nervous system | neurobiology | neurobiology | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | protein localization | protein localization | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | proteins | proteins | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | replication | replication | ribosome | ribosome | RNA | RNA | stem cells | stem cells | transcription | transcription | translation | translation | virology | virology | biology | biology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Callaghan

Description

Professor Chris O'Callaghan tells us about the role of our immune system in vascular disease. The accumulation of fat in the arteries, such as cholesterol, can cause a thickening of the artery wall known as atherosclerosis. Professor Chris O'Callaghan is researching the role of the innate immune system in atherosclerosis to better understand immune responses to vascular disease. This may lead to improved treatments. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

vascular disease | atherosclerosis | immunology | vascular disease | atherosclerosis | immunology

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The lymphatic system in immunity and cancer

Description

Professor David Jackson tells us about the role of the lymphatic system in immunity and cancer. The lymphatic system is a network of vessels collecting the fluids leaked from the blood vasculature. Its filtering function makes it an ideal compartment for the immune system. It is also a pipeline for metastasizing tumour cells to spread to distant tissues. Professor David Jackson studies how leukocytes and tumour cells enter the lymphatic vessels from the surrounding tissues. Professor Jackson's research has the potential to help us better control the spread of tumours, block unwanted immune responses in autoimmune diseases, block tissue rejection and make vaccines more effective. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

lymph node | tumour | immunology | cancer | metastasis | lymphatic system | lymph node | tumour | immunology | cancer | metastasis | lymphatic system

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Cancer Immunlogy

Description

Professor Vincenzo Cerundolo tells us how research in immunology leads to the development of new cancer treatments. Immunotherapy stimulates the bodys immune system and can be a powerful treatment for cancer. With the aim of developing better treatment strategies for cancer patients, Professor Vincenzo Cerundolo is working to gain a better understanding of the cell-to-cell interplay required for optimal expansion and activation of tumour-specific T cell populations. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

cancer | immunotherapy | T cell | vaccines | adjuvants | tumour immunology | cancer | immunotherapy | T cell | vaccines | adjuvants | tumour immunology

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Viral vectored vaccine development

Description

Professor Sarah Gilbert talks about her work on viral vectored vaccines. Professor Sarah Gilbert has been making and testing vaccines designed to induce T cell responses for ten years, chiefly using antigens from malaria and influenza. Based at the Jenner Institute, several of the vaccines developed in Professor Gilberts laboratory have progressed into Clinical Trials. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

immunology | tuberculosis and influenza | malaria | T cell | immune response | vaccine | clinical trials | immunology | tuberculosis and influenza | malaria | T cell | immune response | vaccine | clinical trials

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Progress in Malaria Vaccine Research

Description

Dr Simon Draper tells us about his progress in malaria vaccine research. Dr Simon Draper's research interests include studies of vaccine induced malaria immunity. His group focuses on translational medicine. They will take their most promising vaccine candidates and manufacture them as clinical grade material. The next step is proof of concept clinical trials in healthy volunteers. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

immunology | vaccine | malaria | clinical trials | immunology | vaccine | malaria | clinical trials

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

HST.176 Cellular and Molecular Immunology (MIT) HST.176 Cellular and Molecular Immunology (MIT)

Description

This course covers cells and tissues of the immune system, lymphocyte development, the structure and function of antigen receptors, the cell biology of antigen processing and presentation, including molecular structure and assembly of MHC molecules, the biology of cytokines, leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and the pathogenesis of immunologically mediated diseases. The course is structured as a series of lectures and tutorials in which clinical cases are discussed with faculty tutors. Lecturers Frederick W. Alt Marcus Altfeld Paul Anderson Jon C. Aster Hugh Auchincloss Steven P. Balk Samuel M. Behar Richard S. Blumberg Francisco Bonilla Bobby Cherayil Benjamin Davis David Hafler Nir Harcohen Bruce Horwitz David M. Lee Andrew Lichtman Diane Mathis Richard Mitchell Hidde Ploegh Emmett This course covers cells and tissues of the immune system, lymphocyte development, the structure and function of antigen receptors, the cell biology of antigen processing and presentation, including molecular structure and assembly of MHC molecules, the biology of cytokines, leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and the pathogenesis of immunologically mediated diseases. The course is structured as a series of lectures and tutorials in which clinical cases are discussed with faculty tutors. Lecturers Frederick W. Alt Marcus Altfeld Paul Anderson Jon C. Aster Hugh Auchincloss Steven P. Balk Samuel M. Behar Richard S. Blumberg Francisco Bonilla Bobby Cherayil Benjamin Davis David Hafler Nir Harcohen Bruce Horwitz David M. Lee Andrew Lichtman Diane Mathis Richard Mitchell Hidde Ploegh Emmett

Subjects

immunology | immunology | immune system | immune system | lymphocyte | lymphocyte | antigen | antigen | receptors | receptors | antibody | antibody | T cells | T cells | signal transduction | signal transduction | immunity | immunity | transplantation | transplantation | autoimmunity | autoimmunity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-HST.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Description

Dr Richard Antrobus talks about his research in the development of a universal flu vaccine. Dr Antrobus has been conducting a Phase I study of a Universal Vaccine for Influenza. Progress so far indicates that this approach induces a potent T cell response, and Dr Antrobus is currently assessing whether this response is equally potent in the elderly - one of the 'at risk' groups of the Influenza virus. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Universal Flu Vaccine | Influenza vaccine trials | immunology | Universal Flu Vaccine | Influenza vaccine trials | immunology

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.347 Living Dangerously: How the Immune System Maintains Peace with Trillions of Commensal Bacteria while Preventing Pathogenic Invasions (MIT) 7.347 Living Dangerously: How the Immune System Maintains Peace with Trillions of Commensal Bacteria while Preventing Pathogenic Invasions (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will examine how the immune system acts to destroy pathogenic invaders while tolerating colonization by necessary commensal bacteria. As a counterpoint, we will also explore sophisticated strategies that help some bacteria evade our immune system. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching. In this course, we will examine how the immune system acts to destroy pathogenic invaders while tolerating colonization by necessary commensal bacteria. As a counterpoint, we will also explore sophisticated strategies that help some bacteria evade our immune system. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching.

Subjects

commensal bacteria | commensal bacteria | mucosal epithelia | mucosal epithelia | host-pathogen interactions | host-pathogen interactions | immunology | immunology | GTPase | GTPase | cell signaling | cell signaling | bacterial toxins | bacterial toxins | Campylobacter | Campylobacter | Salmonella | Salmonella | E. coli | E. coli | strain O157:H17 | gut microbiome | dysbiosis | autoimmune diseases | strain O157:H17 | gut microbiome | dysbiosis | autoimmune diseases

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

HIV and children in Africa

Description

Professor Sarah Rowland-Jones tells us about her work on HIV with children in Africa. Prof. Sarah Rowland-Jones' work mainly focuses on anti-viral immunity, and in particular how immune responses modify the outcome of HIV infection. Her research aims to contribute to the design of vaccines and immunotherapies against HIV infection, including HIV-2 infection, in developing countries where an effective vaccine is desperately needed. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Africa | T cells | HIV-2 | HIV-1 | infant immunology | immunity | Africa | T cells | HIV-2 | HIV-1 | infant immunology | immunity

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata