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21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches. We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches.

Subjects

primary sources | primary sources | women's studies | women's studies | gender history | gender history | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | media studies | media studies | visual culture | visual culture | environmental history | environmental history | postmodernism | postmodernism | microhistory | microhistory | digital humanities | digital humanities | national history | national history | borders | borders | frontier | frontier | global history | global history | imperialism | imperialism | historiography | historiography | analytical framework | analytical framework

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.968J Nature, Environment, and Empire (MIT) 21H.968J Nature, Environment, and Empire (MIT)

Description

This class examines the relationship between the study of natural history, both domestic and exotic, by Europeans and Americans, and exploration and exploitation of the natural world, focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This class examines the relationship between the study of natural history, both domestic and exotic, by Europeans and Americans, and exploration and exploitation of the natural world, focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Subjects

21H.968 | 21H.968 | STS.415 | STS.415 | imperialism | imperialism | colonization | colonization | global exploration | global exploration | environment | environment | nature | nature | natural history | natural history | domestic animals | domestic animals | Charles Darwin | Charles Darwin | James Cook | James Cook

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.221 The Places of Migration in United States History (MIT) 21H.221 The Places of Migration in United States History (MIT)

Description

This course examines the history of the United States as a "nation of immigrants" within a broader global context. It considers migration from the mid-19th century to the present through case studies of such places as New York's Lower East Side, South Texas, Florida, and San Francisco's Chinatown. It also examines the role of memory, media, and popular culture in shaping ideas about migration. The course includes optional field trip to New York City. This course examines the history of the United States as a "nation of immigrants" within a broader global context. It considers migration from the mid-19th century to the present through case studies of such places as New York's Lower East Side, South Texas, Florida, and San Francisco's Chinatown. It also examines the role of memory, media, and popular culture in shaping ideas about migration. The course includes optional field trip to New York City.

Subjects

immigration | immigration | migration | migration | lawrence | lawrence | chinatown | chinatown | U.S.-Mexico border | U.S.-Mexico border | Great Migration | Great Migration | The Jazz Singer | The Jazz Singer | Lower East Side | Lower East Side | ethnicity | ethnicity | New York City | New York City | New Immigration | New Immigration | Filipino | Filipino | american imperialism | american imperialism | cuban-american | cuban-american | multiculturalism | multiculturalism | caribbean migration | caribbean migration | asian immigration | asian immigration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.443 European Imperialism in the 19th and 20th Centuries (MIT) 21H.443 European Imperialism in the 19th and 20th Centuries (MIT)

Description

From pineapples grown in Hawaii to English-speaking call centers outsourced to India, the legacy of the "Age of Imperialism" appears everywhere in our modern world. This class explores the history of European imperialism in its political, economic, and cultural dimensions from the 1840s through the 1960s. From pineapples grown in Hawaii to English-speaking call centers outsourced to India, the legacy of the "Age of Imperialism" appears everywhere in our modern world. This class explores the history of European imperialism in its political, economic, and cultural dimensions from the 1840s through the 1960s.

Subjects

History | History | europe | europe | european | european | imperialism | imperialism | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | political | political | economic | economic | cultural | cultural | Africa | Africa | India | India | Asia | Asia | imperial expansion | imperial expansion | the rise of "scientific" racism | the rise of "scientific" racism | national identities | national identities | social class | social class | gender | gender | colonial ideologies | colonial ideologies | colonial rule | colonial rule | decolonization | decolonization | globalization | globalization | post-colonial world. | post-colonial world.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history. This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history.

Subjects

primary sources | primary sources | gender history | gender history | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | media studies | media studies | visual culture | visual culture | environmental history | environmental history | postmodernism | postmodernism | microhistory | microhistory | digital humanities | digital humanities | national history | national history | borders | borders | frontier | frontier | global history | global history | imperialism | imperialism | historiography | historiography | analytical framework | analytical framework | agrarian history | agrarian history | historical demography | historical demography | European history | European history | American history | American history | Asian history | Asian history | maps | maps | African history | African history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.968J Nature, Environment, and Empire (MIT) 21H.968J Nature, Environment, and Empire (MIT)

Description

This class examines the relationship between the study of natural history, both domestic and exotic, by Europeans and Americans, and exploration and exploitation of the natural world, focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This class examines the relationship between the study of natural history, both domestic and exotic, by Europeans and Americans, and exploration and exploitation of the natural world, focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Subjects

21H.968 | 21H.968 | STS.415 | STS.415 | imperialism | imperialism | colonization | colonization | global exploration | global exploration | environment | environment | nature | nature | natural history | natural history | domestic animals | domestic animals | Charles Darwin | Charles Darwin | James Cook | James Cook

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT) STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science. This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science.

Subjects

history | history | science | science | darwin | darwin | galileo | galileo | goethe | goethe | mesmer | mesmer | boyle | boyle | hobbes | hobbes | einstein | einstein | bethe | bethe | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | victorian | victorian | philosophy | philosophy | science in cultural context | science in cultural context | imperialism | imperialism | natural history | natural history | institutions | institutions | biomedical research | biomedical research | modern physics | modern physics | post-war physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | scientific advancement | evolution | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT)

Description

This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-Western countries. The issues covered by the course include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing and labor standards, post-conflict development and the role of aid in development. This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-Western countries. The issues covered by the course include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing and labor standards, post-conflict development and the role of aid in development.

Subjects

international development | international development | colonialism | colonialism | imperialism | imperialism | human rights | human rights | global | global | state | state | markets | markets | NGOs | NGOs | social movements | social movements | urban | urban | rural | rural | migration | migration | trade | trade | outsourcing | outsourcing | corruption | corruption | aid | aid | poverty | poverty | security | security | conflict | conflict | state intervention | state intervention | governance | governance | law | law | privatization | privatization | participatory planning | participatory planning | decentralization | decentralization | civil service | civil service | labor | labor | post-conflict | post-conflict

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT) STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science. This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science.

Subjects

history | history | science | science | darwin | darwin | galileo | galileo | goethe | goethe | mesmer | mesmer | boyle | boyle | hobbes | hobbes | einstein | einstein | bethe | bethe | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | victorian | victorian | philosophy | philosophy | science in cultural context | science in cultural context | imperialism | imperialism | natural history | natural history | institutions | institutions | biomedical research | biomedical research | modern physics | modern physics | post-war physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | scientific advancement | evolution | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-5 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT) 21W.730-5 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience—specifically, prose that is both critical and personal, that features your ideas, your perspective, and your voice to engage readers. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that critically engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of pieces that address current issues in popular culture. These readings will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal, attending always to the ways yo This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience—specifically, prose that is both critical and personal, that features your ideas, your perspective, and your voice to engage readers. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that critically engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of pieces that address current issues in popular culture. These readings will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal, attending always to the ways yo

Subjects

contemporary | contemporary | contemporary issues | contemporary issues | culture | culture | culture shock | culture shock | urban and environmental crises | urban and environmental crises | economic imperialism | economic imperialism | sexual and reproductive politics | sexual and reproductive politics | the ethics of biotechnologies | the ethics of biotechnologies | issues of race and gender | issues of race and gender | the romance of technology | the romance of technology | robotics and cyborg cultures | robotics and cyborg cultures | media saturation | media saturation | language and representation | language and representation | writing | writing | workshop | workshop | Honeymoon Phase | Honeymoon Phase | Negotiation Phase | Negotiation Phase | Adjustment Phase | Adjustment Phase | Reverse Culture Shock | Reverse Culture Shock | anxiety | anxiety | feelings | feelings | surprise | surprise | disorientation | disorientation | uncertainty | uncertainty | confusion | confusion | assimilating | assimilating | current | current

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-5 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Imagining the Future (MIT) 21W.730-5 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Imagining the Future (MIT)

Description

Turn-of-the-century eras have historically been times when people are more than usually inclined to scrutinize the present and speculate about the future. Now, the turn not just of a century but of a millennium having recently passed, such scrutiny and speculations inevitably intensify. What will the future that awaits us in this twenty-first century and beyond be like? And how do visions of that future reflect and respond to the world we live in now? In this course we will read and write about how some writers and filmmakers have responded to the present as a way of imagining—and warning about—possible worlds to come. Guided by our reading and discussion, we will scrutinize our own present and construct our own visions of the future through close readings of the texts as well Turn-of-the-century eras have historically been times when people are more than usually inclined to scrutinize the present and speculate about the future. Now, the turn not just of a century but of a millennium having recently passed, such scrutiny and speculations inevitably intensify. What will the future that awaits us in this twenty-first century and beyond be like? And how do visions of that future reflect and respond to the world we live in now? In this course we will read and write about how some writers and filmmakers have responded to the present as a way of imagining—and warning about—possible worlds to come. Guided by our reading and discussion, we will scrutinize our own present and construct our own visions of the future through close readings of the texts as well

Subjects

urban and environmental crises | urban and environmental crises | economic imperialism | economic imperialism | sexual and reproductive politics | sexual and reproductive politics | the ethics of biotechnologies | the ethics of biotechnologies | issues of race and gender | issues of race and gender | the romance of technology | the romance of technology | robotics and cyborg cultures | robotics and cyborg cultures | media saturation | media saturation | language and representation | language and representation | writing | writing | workshop | workshop

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.715 Media in Cultural Context (MIT) 21L.715 Media in Cultural Context (MIT)

Description

This course explores the international trade in television text, considering the ways in which 'foreign' programs find places within 'domestic' schedules. Looking at the life television texts maintain outside of their home market, this course examines questions of globalization and national cultures of production and reception. Students will be introduced to a range of positions about the nature of international textual trade, including economic arguments about the structuring of international markets and ethnographic studies about the role imported content plays in the formation of hybrid national identities. Students will be encouraged to consider the role American content is made to play in non-American markets. This course explores the international trade in television text, considering the ways in which 'foreign' programs find places within 'domestic' schedules. Looking at the life television texts maintain outside of their home market, this course examines questions of globalization and national cultures of production and reception. Students will be introduced to a range of positions about the nature of international textual trade, including economic arguments about the structuring of international markets and ethnographic studies about the role imported content plays in the formation of hybrid national identities. Students will be encouraged to consider the role American content is made to play in non-American markets.

Subjects

television | television | world markets | world markets | globalization | globalization | national cultures of production and reception | national cultures of production and reception | international cultural exchange | international cultural exchange | format trading | format trading | creativity of translation | creativity of translation | international circulation of light entertainment | international circulation of light entertainment | identity formation | identity formation | domestic content regulation strategies | domestic content regulation strategies | cultural imports | cultural imports | media imperialism | media imperialism | production industires | production industires | economics | economics | cultural translation | cultural translation | universal texts | universal texts | trade flows | trade flows | adaptation | adaptation | subtitling | subtitling | genre | genre | transparency | transparency | diasporic media | diasporic media | American culture | American culture | local reception | local reception | response | response

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT) 21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT)

Description

This class offers a look into the last five hundred years of world history. Rather than attempt an exhaustive chronology of everything that has occurred on the globe since 1492 - an impossible task for a lifetime, let alone a single semester - we will be focusing on certain geographic areas at specific times, in order to highlight a particular historical problem or to examine the roots of processes that have had an enormous impact on the contemporary world. This class offers a look into the last five hundred years of world history. Rather than attempt an exhaustive chronology of everything that has occurred on the globe since 1492 - an impossible task for a lifetime, let alone a single semester - we will be focusing on certain geographic areas at specific times, in order to highlight a particular historical problem or to examine the roots of processes that have had an enormous impact on the contemporary world.

Subjects

world | world | history | history | 1492 | 1492 | colonialism | colonialism | imperialism | imperialism | political | political | social | social | revolution | revolution | industrialization | industrialization | consumer society | consumer society | transatlantic contacts | transatlantic contacts | Columbus | Columbus | New World | New World | racism | racism | slavery | slavery | Ottoman Empire | Ottoman Empire | French revolution | French revolution | human rights | human rights | Haiti | Haiti | Communist Manifesto | Communist Manifesto | Das Capital | Das Capital | Africa | Africa | Opium Wars | Opium Wars | Far East | Far East | Communism | Communism | Cold War | Cold War | globalization | globalization | French revolution | human rights | French revolution | human rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT) 21G.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence. An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence.

Subjects

asian immigration | asian immigration | chinese problem | chinese problem | anti-asian movements | anti-asian movements | WWII | WWII | new wave immigration | new wave immigration | racism | racism | affirmative action | affirmative action | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | Chinatown | Chinatown | panethnicity | panethnicity | memoir | memoir | chinese exlucsion | chinese exlucsion | U.S. imperialism | U.S. imperialism | Philippines | Philippines | japanese-american internment | japanese-american internment | diaspora | diaspora

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.909J People and Other Animals (MIT) 21H.909J People and Other Animals (MIT)

Description

This class provides a historical survey of the ways that people have interacted with their closest animal relatives, for example: hunting, domestication of livestock, exploitation of animal labor, scientific study of animals, display of exotic and performing animals, and pet keeping. Themes include changing ideas about animal agency and intelligence, our moral obligations to animals, and the limits imposed on the use of animals. This class provides a historical survey of the ways that people have interacted with their closest animal relatives, for example: hunting, domestication of livestock, exploitation of animal labor, scientific study of animals, display of exotic and performing animals, and pet keeping. Themes include changing ideas about animal agency and intelligence, our moral obligations to animals, and the limits imposed on the use of animals.

Subjects

people | people | animals | animals | hunting | hunting | domestication | domestication | livestock | livestock | animal labor | animal labor | scientific experimentation | scientific experimentation | pets | pets | zoos | zoos | selective breeding | selective breeding | vivisection | vivisection | vegetarian | vegetarian | animal cruelty | animal cruelty | poaching | poaching | conservation | conservation | cloning | cloning | colonialism | colonialism | imperialism | imperialism | mad cow disease | mad cow disease | taxidermy | taxidermy | natural history museum | natural history museum | ethology | ethology | primatology | primatology | animal welfare | animal welfare | biodiversity | biodiversity

License

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT) STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to the history and historiography of science from ancient Greece to the present. It is designed to serve as an introduction for those who have no prior background in the field and to deepen the knowledge of those who already do. We will consider how the history of science has responded to its encounters with philosophy, sociology, economics, and anthropology. Our readings and discussions will focus on determining what makes particular works effective, understanding major contemporary trends and debates in the history of science, and establishing resources for further research. This course offers an introduction to the history and historiography of science from ancient Greece to the present. It is designed to serve as an introduction for those who have no prior background in the field and to deepen the knowledge of those who already do. We will consider how the history of science has responded to its encounters with philosophy, sociology, economics, and anthropology. Our readings and discussions will focus on determining what makes particular works effective, understanding major contemporary trends and debates in the history of science, and establishing resources for further research.

Subjects

history | history | science | science | darwin | darwin | galileo | galileo | goethe | goethe | mesmer | mesmer | boyle | boyle | hobbes | hobbes | einstein | einstein | bethe | bethe | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | victorian | victorian | philosophy | philosophy | science in cultural context | science in cultural context | imperialism | imperialism | natural history | natural history | institutions | institutions | biomedical research | biomedical research | modern physics | modern physics | post-war physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | scientific advancement | evolution | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT) STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science. This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science.

Subjects

history | history | science | science | darwin | darwin | galileo | galileo | goethe | goethe | mesmer | mesmer | boyle | boyle | hobbes | hobbes | einstein | einstein | bethe | bethe | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | victorian | victorian | philosophy | philosophy | science in cultural context | science in cultural context | imperialism | imperialism | natural history | natural history | institutions | institutions | biomedical research | biomedical research | modern physics | modern physics | post-war physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | scientific advancement | evolution | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.341 Contemporary French Film and Social Issues (MIT) 21G.341 Contemporary French Film and Social Issues (MIT)

Description

This course covers issues in contemporary French society as expressed through movies made in the 2000s. Topics include France's national self-image, the women's movement, sexuality and gender, family life and class structure, post-colonialism and immigration, and American cultural imperialism. Films by Lelouch, Audiard, Doillon, Denis, Klapisch, Resnais, Rouan, Balasko, Collard, Dridi, Kassovitz, and others. Readings from French periodicals. Films shown with English subtitles. Taught in French. This course covers issues in contemporary French society as expressed through movies made in the 2000s. Topics include France's national self-image, the women's movement, sexuality and gender, family life and class structure, post-colonialism and immigration, and American cultural imperialism. Films by Lelouch, Audiard, Doillon, Denis, Klapisch, Resnais, Rouan, Balasko, Collard, Dridi, Kassovitz, and others. Readings from French periodicals. Films shown with English subtitles. Taught in French.

Subjects

France | France | French | French | contemporary | contemporary | 1990s | 1990s | national image | national image | women's movement | women's movement | sexuality | sexuality | gender | gender | class structure | class structure | family | family | post-colonialism | post-colonialism | immigration | immigration | American cultural imperialism | American cultural imperialism | Lelouch | Lelouch | Audiard | Audiard | Doillon | Doillon | Denis | Denis | Klapisch | Klapisch | Resnais | Resnais | Rouan | Rouan | Balasko | Balasko | Collard | Collard | Dridi | Dridi | Kassovitz | Kassovitz

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT) 21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT)

Description

21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers. 21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers.

Subjects

insurgents | insurgents | war | war | freedom fighters | freedom fighters | independence | independence | self-determination | self-determination | emancipation | emancipation | revolution | revolution | Mao | Mao | Lenin | Lenin | Reagan | Reagan | L'Ouverture | L'Ouverture | reactionary | reactionary | imperialism | imperialism | human rights | human rights | democracy | democracy | populism | populism | Communism | Communism | equality | equality | nationalism | nationalism | resistance | resistance | ideology | ideology | subversion | subversion | underground | underground | suppression | suppression

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.161 The Middle East in the 20th Century (MIT) 21H.161 The Middle East in the 20th Century (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the history of the Middle East, from the end of the 19th century to the present. It examines major political, social, intellectual and cultural issues and practices. It also focuses on important events, movements, and ideas that prevailed during the last century and affect its current realities. This course surveys the history of the Middle East, from the end of the 19th century to the present. It examines major political, social, intellectual and cultural issues and practices. It also focuses on important events, movements, and ideas that prevailed during the last century and affect its current realities.

Subjects

Middle East | Middle East | history | history | Ottoman period | Ottoman period | imperialism | imperialism | nation-state | nation-state | Turkey | Turkey | Egypt | Egypt | Israeli-Palestinian conflict | Israeli-Palestinian conflict | Islam | Islam | Iranian Revolution | Iranian Revolution | democracy | democracy | Orientalism | Orientalism | Western Imperialism | Western Imperialism | World War I | World War I | Great War | Great War | Nationalism | Nationalism | Israel | Israel | Palestine | Palestine | Islamic radicalism | Islamic radicalism | Hamas | Hamas | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Isis | Isis | Iraq | Iraq | Yezidis | Yezidis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT) 21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT)

Description

This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two. This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two.

Subjects

Muscovy | Muscovy | Empire | Empire | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | Catherine II | Catherine II | Pugachev | Pugachev | nobility | nobility | Constitution | Constitution | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | Nicholas I | Nicholas I | Decembrists | Decembrists | serfdom | serfdom | Alexander II | Alexander II | Great reforms | Great reforms | intelligentsia | intelligentsia | Caucasus | Caucasus | Chechnya | Chechnya | Lenin | Lenin | World War I | World War I | Nicholas II | Nicholas II | Rasputin | Rasputin | Russia | Russia | social heritage | social heritage | cultural heritage | cultural heritage | political heritage | political heritage | Eurasian imperialism | Eurasian imperialism | autocracy | autocracy | political reform | political reform | political revolution | political revolution | revolutionary | revolutionary | debates | debates | capitalism | capitalism | historical texts | historical texts | literary texts | literary texts | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | 19th century | 19th century | major European power | major European power | intellectual class | intellectual class | autocratic order | autocratic order | states | states | societies | societies | West | West | national consciousness | national consciousness | state | state | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-1 Imagining the Future (MIT) 21W.730-1 Imagining the Future (MIT)

Description

Turn-of-the-century eras have historically been times when people are more than usually inclined to scrutinize the present and speculate about the future. Now, the turn not just of a century but of a millennium having recently passed, such scrutiny and speculations inevitably intensify. What will the future that awaits us in this twenty-first century and beyond be like? And how do visions of that future reflect and respond to the world we live in now? In this writing course we will read and write about how some twentieth-century writers and filmmakers have attended to the present as a way of imagining -- and warning about -- possible worlds to come. Guided by our reading and discussion, we will scrutinize our own present and construct our own visions of the future through close readings of Turn-of-the-century eras have historically been times when people are more than usually inclined to scrutinize the present and speculate about the future. Now, the turn not just of a century but of a millennium having recently passed, such scrutiny and speculations inevitably intensify. What will the future that awaits us in this twenty-first century and beyond be like? And how do visions of that future reflect and respond to the world we live in now? In this writing course we will read and write about how some twentieth-century writers and filmmakers have attended to the present as a way of imagining -- and warning about -- possible worlds to come. Guided by our reading and discussion, we will scrutinize our own present and construct our own visions of the future through close readings of

Subjects

Turn-of-the-century | Turn-of-the-century | eras | eras | present | present | future | future | millennium | millennium | twenty-first century | twenty-first century | visions | visions | imagination | imagination | world | world | writing | writing | read | read | twentieth-century | twentieth-century | writers | writers | filmmakers | filmmakers | imagining | imagining | warning | warning | discussion | discussion | contemporary | contemporary | culture | culture | urban | urban | environmental | environmental | crises | crises | economic | economic | imperialism | imperialism | sexual | sexual | reproductive | reproductive | politics | politics | race | race | gender | gender | romance | romance | technology | technology | robotics | robotics | cyborg | cyborg | media saturation | media saturation | language | language | representation | representation | human | human

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.909J People and Other Animals (MIT)

Description

This class provides a historical survey of the ways that people have interacted with their closest animal relatives, for example: hunting, domestication of livestock, exploitation of animal labor, scientific study of animals, display of exotic and performing animals, and pet keeping. Themes include changing ideas about animal agency and intelligence, our moral obligations to animals, and the limits imposed on the use of animals.

Subjects

people | animals | hunting | domestication | livestock | animal labor | scientific experimentation | pets | zoos | selective breeding | vivisection | vegetarian | animal cruelty | poaching | conservation | cloning | colonialism | imperialism | mad cow disease | taxidermy | natural history museum | ethology | primatology | animal welfare | biodiversity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Late nineteenth-century Britain and America: the people and the empire

Description

In this unit we shall look more closely at the evidence available to assess the truth of this argument. Were the working people, as opposed to the political leaders, interested in the issue of expansion? Was such interest evident only among certain sections of the community? Was it predominantly an enthusiasm for empire or not? We shall also try to identify some of the reasons underlying the nature of the response. And we shall be interested in how far politicians found it worth their while to ‘play to the gallery’ and to manipulate popular opinion. Through it all, we shall be facing some acute problems of evidence: is it possible to discover what ‘ordinary’ people thought about expansionism?

Subjects

arts and history | america | britain | british_empire | empire | expansionism | history | humanities | imperialism | nineteenth_century | politicians | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT)

Description

21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers.

Subjects

insurgents | war | freedom fighters | independence | self-determination | emancipation | revolution | Mao | Lenin | Reagan | L'Ouverture | reactionary | imperialism | human rights | democracy | populism | Communism | equality | nationalism | resistance | ideology | subversion | underground | suppression

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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