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11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations: How Organizations Behave (MIT) 11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations: How Organizations Behave (MIT)

Description

This class analyzes how organizations behave, both government and nongovernment, drawing on the literature of the sociology of organizations, political science, and public administration. The class seeks to demonstrate rationality in otherwise seemingly chaotic organizational environments and implementation experiences. It builds analytical skills for evaluating programs and projects, organizations, and environments, and draws equally on developing-country and developed-country literature. This class analyzes how organizations behave, both government and nongovernment, drawing on the literature of the sociology of organizations, political science, and public administration. The class seeks to demonstrate rationality in otherwise seemingly chaotic organizational environments and implementation experiences. It builds analytical skills for evaluating programs and projects, organizations, and environments, and draws equally on developing-country and developed-country literature.

Subjects

organizations | organizations | organizational behavior | organizational behavior | government and nongovernment | government and nongovernment | sociology of organizations | sociology of organizations | political science | political science | public administration | public administration | chaotic organizational environments | chaotic organizational environments | implementation experience | implementation experience | analytical skills | analytical skills | projects | projects | and environments | and environments | developing-country and developed-country | developing-country and developed-country

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.225 Computational Mechanics of Materials (MIT) 16.225 Computational Mechanics of Materials (MIT)

Description

16.225 is a graduate level course on Computational Mechanics of Materials. The primary focus of this course is on the teaching of state-of-the-art numerical methods for the analysis of the nonlinear continuum response of materials. The range of material behavior considered in this course includes: linear and finite deformation elasticity, inelasticity and dynamics. Numerical formulation and algorithms include: variational formulation and variational constitutive updates, finite element discretization, error estimation, constrained problems, time integration algorithms and convergence analysis. There is a strong emphasis on the (parallel) computer implementation of algorithms in programming assignments. The application to real engineering applications and problems in engineering science is 16.225 is a graduate level course on Computational Mechanics of Materials. The primary focus of this course is on the teaching of state-of-the-art numerical methods for the analysis of the nonlinear continuum response of materials. The range of material behavior considered in this course includes: linear and finite deformation elasticity, inelasticity and dynamics. Numerical formulation and algorithms include: variational formulation and variational constitutive updates, finite element discretization, error estimation, constrained problems, time integration algorithms and convergence analysis. There is a strong emphasis on the (parallel) computer implementation of algorithms in programming assignments. The application to real engineering applications and problems in engineering science is

Subjects

Computational Mechanics | Computational Mechanics | Computation | Computation | Mechanics | Mechanics | Materials | Materials | Numerical Methods | Numerical Methods | Numerical | Numerical | Nonlinear Continuum Response | Nonlinear Continuum Response | Continuum | Continuum | Deformation | Deformation | Elasticity | Elasticity | Inelasticity | Inelasticity | Dynamics | Dynamics | Variational Formulation | Variational Formulation | Variational Constitutive Updates | Variational Constitutive Updates | Finite Element | Finite Element | Discretization | Discretization | Error Estimation | Error Estimation | Constrained Problems | Constrained Problems | Time Integration | Time Integration | Convergence Analysis | Convergence Analysis | Programming | Programming | Continuum Response | Continuum Response | Computational | Computational | state-of-the-art | state-of-the-art | methods | methods | modeling | modeling | simulation | simulation | mechanical | mechanical | response | response | engineering | engineering | aerospace | aerospace | civil | civil | material | material | science | science | biomechanics | biomechanics | behavior | behavior | finite | finite | deformation | deformation | elasticity | elasticity | inelasticity | inelasticity | contact | contact | friction | friction | coupled | coupled | numerical | numerical | formulation | formulation | algorithms | algorithms | Variational | Variational | constitutive | constitutive | updates | updates | element | element | discretization | discretization | mesh | mesh | generation | generation | error | error | estimation | estimation | constrained | constrained | problems | problems | time | time | convergence | convergence | analysis | analysis | parallel | parallel | computer | computer | implementation | implementation | programming | programming | assembly | assembly | equation-solving | equation-solving | formulating | formulating | implementing | implementing | complex | complex | approximations | approximations | equations | equations | motion | motion | dynamic | dynamic | deformations | deformations | continua | continua | plasticity | plasticity | rate-dependency | rate-dependency | integration | integration

License

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EC.715 D-Lab: Disseminating Innovations for the Common Good (MIT) EC.715 D-Lab: Disseminating Innovations for the Common Good (MIT)

Description

In the trilogy of D-Lab courses, D-Lab: Dissemination focuses on disseminating innovations among underserved communities, especially in developing countries. Students acquire skills related to building partnerships and piloting, financing, implementing, and scaling-up a selected innovation for the common good. The course is structured around MIT and outside competitions. Teams develop an idea, project or (social) business plan that is "ready to roll" by term's end. Course includes an on-line forum discussion board, student-led case studies and a final proposal or business plan for realizing your dream innovation. In the trilogy of D-Lab courses, D-Lab: Dissemination focuses on disseminating innovations among underserved communities, especially in developing countries. Students acquire skills related to building partnerships and piloting, financing, implementing, and scaling-up a selected innovation for the common good. The course is structured around MIT and outside competitions. Teams develop an idea, project or (social) business plan that is "ready to roll" by term's end. Course includes an on-line forum discussion board, student-led case studies and a final proposal or business plan for realizing your dream innovation.

Subjects

development | development | innovation | innovation | technology implementation | technology implementation | third world | third world | developing nations | developing nations | social business plan | social business plan | project development | project development | poverty | poverty | hygiene | hygiene | health | health

License

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11.471 Political Economy of Development Projects: Targeting the Poor (MIT) 11.471 Political Economy of Development Projects: Targeting the Poor (MIT)

Description

This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are (1) employment and local economic development, particularly as related to the informal sector, small and medium enterprises, and workers; (2) the political economy of local economic-development initiatives; (3) lessons from policy and implementation experiences; (4) worker conditions, standards, and rights; and (5) associations among small (and often medium) firms, and among workers. The course links these approaches to the broader literature on poverty reduction, economic development, politics, and the reform of government. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are (1) employment and local economic development, particularly as related to the informal sector, small and medium enterprises, and workers; (2) the political economy of local economic-development initiatives; (3) lessons from policy and implementation experiences; (4) worker conditions, standards, and rights; and (5) associations among small (and often medium) firms, and among workers. The course links these approaches to the broader literature on poverty reduction, economic development, politics, and the reform of government. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and

Subjects

public sector | public sector | policies | policies | programs | programs | projects | projects | poverty | poverty | unemployment | unemployment | developing countries | developing countries | local economic development | local economic development | informal sector | informal sector | small enterprises | small enterprises | political economy | political economy | local economic development initiatives | local economic development initiatives | implementation | implementation | worker conditions | worker conditions | associations | associations | government reform | government reform | poverty reduction | poverty reduction | equitable outcomes | equitable outcomes

License

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11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations (MIT) 11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations (MIT)

Description

Organizations and their programs often seem, at first glance, chaotic and without order. Students embarking on evaluations and similar research, therefore, feel perplexed when faced with a live organization. This is because we have been taught to expect a certain kind of rationality in the way organizations behave that is often different than that which actually drives them. As a result of this seeming mismatch between what we expect and the actual reality, students of planning and planners, and researchers and professional evaluators, often recoil from the chaos of reality, wondering why the organization is not doing what it is "supposed" to be doing; correspondingly, they often make recommendations for change that are unrealistic, or draw conclusions from evaluations of success or fail Organizations and their programs often seem, at first glance, chaotic and without order. Students embarking on evaluations and similar research, therefore, feel perplexed when faced with a live organization. This is because we have been taught to expect a certain kind of rationality in the way organizations behave that is often different than that which actually drives them. As a result of this seeming mismatch between what we expect and the actual reality, students of planning and planners, and researchers and professional evaluators, often recoil from the chaos of reality, wondering why the organization is not doing what it is "supposed" to be doing; correspondingly, they often make recommendations for change that are unrealistic, or draw conclusions from evaluations of success or fail

Subjects

organizations | organizations | organizational behavior | organizational behavior | government and nongovernment | government and nongovernment | sociology of organizations | sociology of organizations | political science | political science | public administration | public administration | chaotic organizational environments | chaotic organizational environments | implementation experience | implementation experience | analytical skills | analytical skills | projects | projects | and environments | and environments | developing-country and developed-country | developing-country and developed-country

License

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11.125 Introduction to Education: Understanding and Evaluating Education (MIT) 11.125 Introduction to Education: Understanding and Evaluating Education (MIT)

Description

This class uses K-12 classroom experiences, along with student-centered classroom activities and student-led classes, to explore issues in schools and education. Students in this course spend time each week observing pre-college math and science classes. Topics of study include design and implementation of curriculum, addressing the needs of a diversity of students, standards in math and science, student misconceptions, methods of instruction, the digital divide, teaching through different media, and student assessment. This class uses K-12 classroom experiences, along with student-centered classroom activities and student-led classes, to explore issues in schools and education. Students in this course spend time each week observing pre-college math and science classes. Topics of study include design and implementation of curriculum, addressing the needs of a diversity of students, standards in math and science, student misconceptions, methods of instruction, the digital divide, teaching through different media, and student assessment.

Subjects

classroom experiences | classroom experiences | student-centered classroom activities | student-centered classroom activities | student-led classes | student-led classes | issues in schools and education | issues in schools and education | observing | observing | pre-college math and science classes | pre-college math and science classes | design and implementation of curriculum | design and implementation of curriculum | diversity | diversity | standards in math and science | standards in math and science | student misconceptions | student misconceptions | methods of instruction | methods of instruction | the digital divide | the digital divide | teaching through different media | teaching through different media | student assessment | student assessment

License

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11.969 Workshop on Deliberative Democracy and Dispute Resolution (MIT) 11.969 Workshop on Deliberative Democracy and Dispute Resolution (MIT)

Description

The Workshop on Deliberative Democracy and Dispute Resolution, sponsored by the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School and The Flora and William Hewlett Foundation, is a two-day conference that brings together dispute resolution professionals and political theorists in the field of deliberative democracy. The Workshop on Deliberative Democracy and Dispute Resolution, sponsored by the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School and The Flora and William Hewlett Foundation, is a two-day conference that brings together dispute resolution professionals and political theorists in the field of deliberative democracy.

Subjects

deliberative democracy | deliberative democracy | dispute resolution | dispute resolution | conflict management | conflict management | decision making | decision making | munipalities | munipalities | metropolitan areas | metropolitan areas | policy making | policy making | consensus building | consensus building | implementation of agreements | implementation of agreements | negotiated settlements | negotiated settlements | negotiated agreements | negotiated agreements

License

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2.141 Modeling and Simulation of Dynamic Systems (MIT) 2.141 Modeling and Simulation of Dynamic Systems (MIT)

Description

This course deals with modeling multi-domain engineering systems at a level of detail suitable for design and control system implementation. Topics covered include network representation, state-space models; multi-port energy storage and dissipation, Legendre transforms, nonlinear mechanics, transformation theory, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian forms and control-relevant properties. Application examples may include electro-mechanical transducers, mechanisms, electronics, fluid and thermal systems, compressible flow, chemical processes, diffusion, and wave transmission. This course deals with modeling multi-domain engineering systems at a level of detail suitable for design and control system implementation. Topics covered include network representation, state-space models; multi-port energy storage and dissipation, Legendre transforms, nonlinear mechanics, transformation theory, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian forms and control-relevant properties. Application examples may include electro-mechanical transducers, mechanisms, electronics, fluid and thermal systems, compressible flow, chemical processes, diffusion, and wave transmission.

Subjects

Modeling multi-domain engineering systems | Modeling multi-domain engineering systems | design and control system implementation | design and control system implementation | Network representation | Network representation | state-space models | state-space models | dissipation | dissipation | Legendre transforms | Legendre transforms | Nonlinear mechanics | Nonlinear mechanics | transformation theory | transformation theory | Hamiltonian forms | Hamiltonian forms | Control-relevant properties | Control-relevant properties | electro-mechanical transducers | electro-mechanical transducers | mechanisms | mechanisms | electronics | electronics | thermal systems | thermal systems | compressible flow | compressible flow | chemical processes | chemical processes | diffusion | diffusion | wave transmission | wave transmission

License

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6.035 Computer Language Engineering (MIT) 6.035 Computer Language Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes issues associated with the implementation of higher-level programming languages. Topics covered include: fundamental concepts, functions, and structures of compilers, the interaction of theory and practice, and using tools in building software. The course includes a multi-person project on compiler design and implementation. This course analyzes issues associated with the implementation of higher-level programming languages. Topics covered include: fundamental concepts, functions, and structures of compilers, the interaction of theory and practice, and using tools in building software. The course includes a multi-person project on compiler design and implementation.

Subjects

compilers | compilers | compiler design | compiler design | compiler implementation | compiler implementation | scanner | scanner | parser | parser | semantic checker | semantic checker | code generation | code generation | dataflow optimizations | dataflow optimizations | optimizer | optimizer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.965 Technology Strategy for System Design and Management (MIT) 15.965 Technology Strategy for System Design and Management (MIT)

Description

This course provides you with a framework to understand the structure and dynamics of high-tech businesses, together with an approach for their effective strategic management. It is focused on domains in which systems are important, because either or both products are parts of larger and more complex systems, or they are comprised of systems. The domains covered include computing, communications (in particular the mobile and IP domains), consumer electronics, industrial networking, automotive, aerospace and medical devices. The course will be of particular interest to those interested in managing a business in which technology will likely play a major role, and also to those interested in investing in or providing counsel to these businesses. The emphasis throughout is on the development a This course provides you with a framework to understand the structure and dynamics of high-tech businesses, together with an approach for their effective strategic management. It is focused on domains in which systems are important, because either or both products are parts of larger and more complex systems, or they are comprised of systems. The domains covered include computing, communications (in particular the mobile and IP domains), consumer electronics, industrial networking, automotive, aerospace and medical devices. The course will be of particular interest to those interested in managing a business in which technology will likely play a major role, and also to those interested in investing in or providing counsel to these businesses. The emphasis throughout is on the development a

Subjects

innovation | innovation | strategy | strategy | open source | open source | demand opportunity | demand opportunity | technology strategy | technology strategy | life-cycles | life-cycles | product development | product development | business ecosystems | business ecosystems | disruptive technologies | disruptive technologies | standards | standards | marketing | marketing | open innovation | open innovation | system design | system design | value capture | value capture | business implementation | business implementation

License

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11.125 Exploring K-12 Classroom Teaching (MIT) 11.125 Exploring K-12 Classroom Teaching (MIT)

Description

This subject uses K-12 classroom experiences, along with student-centered classroom activities and student-led classes, to explore issues in schools and education. Students in this course spend time each week observing pre-college math and science classes. Topics of study include design and implementation of curriculum, addressing the needs of a diversity of students, standards in math and science, student misconceptions, methods of instruction, the digital divide, teaching through different media, and student assessment. This subject uses K-12 classroom experiences, along with student-centered classroom activities and student-led classes, to explore issues in schools and education. Students in this course spend time each week observing pre-college math and science classes. Topics of study include design and implementation of curriculum, addressing the needs of a diversity of students, standards in math and science, student misconceptions, methods of instruction, the digital divide, teaching through different media, and student assessment.

Subjects

classroom experiences | classroom experiences | student-centered classroom activities | student-centered classroom activities | student-led classes | student-led classes | issues in schools and education | issues in schools and education | observing | observing | pre-college math and science classes | pre-college math and science classes | design and implementation of curriculum | design and implementation of curriculum | diversity | diversity | standards in math and science | standards in math and science | student misconceptions | student misconceptions | methods of instruction | methods of instruction | the digital divide | the digital divide | teaching through different media | teaching through different media | student assessment | student assessment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.301J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT) 11.301J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT)

Description

This course introduces graduate students to ideas about the form of cities and how they are designed and developed. Part 1 explores the forces which act to shape and to change cities. Part 2 surveys models of urban design which have been invented in response to forces acting on cities. This course introduces graduate students to ideas about the form of cities and how they are designed and developed. Part 1 explores the forces which act to shape and to change cities. Part 2 surveys models of urban design which have been invented in response to forces acting on cities.

Subjects

cities | cities | Boston | Boston | American city | American city | market | market | social forces | social forces | public development | public development | regulation of private development | regulation of private development | incentives to encourage good design | incentives to encourage good design | plans | plans | proposals | proposals | case studies | case studies | field trips | field trips | Traditional City | Traditional City | the City as a Work of Art | the City as a Work of Art | the Efficient City | the Efficient City | the Garden City | the Garden City | the Secure City | the Secure City | the Information City | the Information City | Virtual City | Virtual City | urban analysis | urban analysis | urban design theory | urban design theory | implementation strategy | implementation strategy | private development | private development | regulation | regulation | models | models | modeling | modeling | urban development | urban development

License

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6.911 Transcribing Prosodic Structure of Spoken Utterances with ToBI (MIT) 6.911 Transcribing Prosodic Structure of Spoken Utterances with ToBI (MIT)

Description

This course presents a tutorial on the ToBI (Tones and Break Indices) system, for labelling certain aspects of prosody in Mainstream American English (MAE-ToBI). The course is appropriate for undergrad or grad students with background in linguistics (phonology or phonetics), cognitive psychology (psycholinguistics), speech acoustics or music, who wish to learn about the prosody of speech, i.e. the intonation, rhythm, grouping and prominence patterns of spoken utterances, prosodic differences that signal meaning and phonetic implementation. This course presents a tutorial on the ToBI (Tones and Break Indices) system, for labelling certain aspects of prosody in Mainstream American English (MAE-ToBI). The course is appropriate for undergrad or grad students with background in linguistics (phonology or phonetics), cognitive psychology (psycholinguistics), speech acoustics or music, who wish to learn about the prosody of speech, i.e. the intonation, rhythm, grouping and prominence patterns of spoken utterances, prosodic differences that signal meaning and phonetic implementation.

Subjects

ToBI system | ToBI system | Tones and Break Indices | Tones and Break Indices | prosodic structure | prosodic structure | spoken utterances | spoken utterances | American English | American English | ToBI tutorial | ToBI tutorial | labelling | labelling | sample utterances | sample utterances | linguistics | linguistics | phonology | phonology | phonetics | phonetics | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | speech acoustics or music | speech acoustics or music | prosody of speech | prosody of speech | intonation | intonation | rhythm | rhythm | grouping | grouping | prosodic differences | prosodic differences | phonetic implementation | phonetic implementation

License

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6.854J Advanced Algorithms (MIT) 6.854J Advanced Algorithms (MIT)

Description

6.854J is a first-year graduate course in algorithms, continuing where 6.046J left off. The course emphasizes fundamental algorithms and advanced methods of algorithmic design, analysis, and implementation. Topics include: data structures, network flows, linear programming, computational geometry, approximation algorithms. 6.854J is a first-year graduate course in algorithms, continuing where 6.046J left off. The course emphasizes fundamental algorithms and advanced methods of algorithmic design, analysis, and implementation. Topics include: data structures, network flows, linear programming, computational geometry, approximation algorithms.

Subjects

algorithm design and analysis | algorithm design and analysis | algorithms | algorithms | fundamental algorithms | fundamental algorithms | advanced methods of algorithmic design | advanced methods of algorithmic design | analysis | analysis | implementation | implementation | data structures | data structures | network flows | network flows | linear programming | linear programming | computational geometry | computational geometry | approximation algorithms | approximation algorithms | algorithmic design | algorithmic design | algorithmic analysis | algorithmic analysis | string algorithms | string algorithms | maximum flows | maximum flows | online algorithms | online algorithms | scheduling | scheduling | external memory algorithms | external memory algorithms | 6.854 | 6.854 | 18.415 | 18.415

License

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21W.785 Communicating in Cyberspace (MIT) 21W.785 Communicating in Cyberspace (MIT)

Description

This class covers the analysis, design, implementation and testing of various forms of digital communication based on group collaboration. Students are encouraged to think about the Web and other new digital interactive media not just in terms of technology but also broader issues such as language (verbal and visual), design, information architecture, communication and community. Students work in small groups on a semester-long project of their choice. This class covers the analysis, design, implementation and testing of various forms of digital communication based on group collaboration. Students are encouraged to think about the Web and other new digital interactive media not just in terms of technology but also broader issues such as language (verbal and visual), design, information architecture, communication and community. Students work in small groups on a semester-long project of their choice.

Subjects

communication | communication | online | online | cyber space | cyber space | website | website | writing | writing | digital technology | digital technology | analysis | analysis | design | design | implementation | implementation | testing | testing | digital communication | digital communication | group collaboration | group collaboration | web | web | world wide web | world wide web | www | www | digital interactive media | digital interactive media | technology | technology | verbal language | verbal language | visual langauge | visual langauge | web design | web design | information architecture | information architecture | IA | IA | communities | communities | graphic design | graphic design | usability testing | usability testing | team management | team management | web programming | web programming | web writing | web writing | project planning | project planning | large-scale digital projects | large-scale digital projects

License

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6.972 Algebraic Techniques and Semidefinite Optimization (MIT) 6.972 Algebraic Techniques and Semidefinite Optimization (MIT)

Description

This research-oriented course will focus on algebraic and computational techniques for optimization problems involving polynomial equations and inequalities with particular emphasis on the connections with semidefinite optimization. The course will develop in a parallel fashion several algebraic and numerical approaches to polynomial systems, with a view towards methods that simultaneously incorporate both elements. We will study both the complex and real cases, developing techniques of general applicability, and stressing convexity-based ideas, complexity results, and efficient implementations. Although we will use examples from several engineering areas, particular emphasis will be given to those arising from systems and control applications. This research-oriented course will focus on algebraic and computational techniques for optimization problems involving polynomial equations and inequalities with particular emphasis on the connections with semidefinite optimization. The course will develop in a parallel fashion several algebraic and numerical approaches to polynomial systems, with a view towards methods that simultaneously incorporate both elements. We will study both the complex and real cases, developing techniques of general applicability, and stressing convexity-based ideas, complexity results, and efficient implementations. Although we will use examples from several engineering areas, particular emphasis will be given to those arising from systems and control applications.

Subjects

algebraic and computational techniques | algebraic and computational techniques | optimization problems | optimization problems | polynomial equations | polynomial equations | inequalities | inequalities | semidefinite optimization | semidefinite optimization | convexity-based ideas | convexity-based ideas | complexity results | complexity results | efficient implementations | efficient implementations

License

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11.131 Educational Theory and Practice III (MIT) 11.131 Educational Theory and Practice III (MIT)

Description

This is the final course in the three course sequence (11.129, 11.130 and 11.131) that deals with the practicalities of teaching students. Our areas of study will include: educational psychology, identification of useful resources that support instruction, learning to use technology in meaningful ways in the classroom, finding more methods of motivating students, implementing differentiated instruction and obtaining a teaching job. This is the final course in the three course sequence (11.129, 11.130 and 11.131) that deals with the practicalities of teaching students. Our areas of study will include: educational psychology, identification of useful resources that support instruction, learning to use technology in meaningful ways in the classroom, finding more methods of motivating students, implementing differentiated instruction and obtaining a teaching job.

Subjects

classroom experiences | classroom experiences | student-centered classroom activities | student-centered classroom activities | student-led classes | student-led classes | issues in schools and education | issues in schools and education | observing | observing | pre-college math and science classes | pre-college math and science classes | design and implementation of curriculum | design and implementation of curriculum | diversity | diversity | standards in math and science | standards in math and science | student misconceptions | student misconceptions | methods of instruction | methods of instruction | the digital divide | the digital divide | teaching through different media | teaching through different media | student assessment | student assessment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Art, the (Social) Science and the Politics of Building State Capability for Implementation

Description

The talk addresses an apparent paradox between development indicators that seem to be improving and measures of institutional quality that are flat or declining

Subjects

building state capability | PDIA | Michael Woolcok | policy implementation | bureaucracy | building state capability | PDIA | Michael Woolcok | policy implementation | bureaucracy | 2014-11-04

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.S940 Development, Planning, and Implementation: The Dialectic of Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.S940 Development, Planning, and Implementation: The Dialectic of Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This is an advanced seminar that will analyze the effectiveness of development and planning theories from the perspective of practitioners who implement projects and policies based on such theories. The ultimate goal is to create new planning sensibilities, which theorize from practice, not the other way around. This is an advanced seminar that will analyze the effectiveness of development and planning theories from the perspective of practitioners who implement projects and policies based on such theories. The ultimate goal is to create new planning sensibilities, which theorize from practice, not the other way around.

Subjects

development | development | planning | planning | theory | theory | implementation | implementation | developing nations | developing nations | cities | cities | economics | economics | industrialization | industrialization | undeveloped areas | undeveloped areas | modernism | modernism | government | government | poverty | poverty | public administration | public administration | public sector | public sector | sustainability | sustainability | ethics | ethics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.423 Information and Communication Technologies in Community Development (MIT) 11.423 Information and Communication Technologies in Community Development (MIT)

Description

This practicum subject integrates theory and practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of a comprehensive community information infrastructure that promotes democratic involvement and informs community development projects. Students work with Lawrence Community Works, Inc. to involve constituents and generate solutions to an important planning problem in the City of Lawrence, Massachusetts. Final project presentations take place in a public forum, and serve to inform future development of the information infrastructure. Subject begins with an overview of the digital divide, e-government, public participation GIS, and neighborhood information systems. Subject includes a reflection component and a deliberate investigation of race, class, and gender dynamics. This practicum subject integrates theory and practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of a comprehensive community information infrastructure that promotes democratic involvement and informs community development projects. Students work with Lawrence Community Works, Inc. to involve constituents and generate solutions to an important planning problem in the City of Lawrence, Massachusetts. Final project presentations take place in a public forum, and serve to inform future development of the information infrastructure. Subject begins with an overview of the digital divide, e-government, public participation GIS, and neighborhood information systems. Subject includes a reflection component and a deliberate investigation of race, class, and gender dynamics.

Subjects

theory and practice | theory and practice | implementation | implementation | evaluation | evaluation | comprehensive community information infrastructure | comprehensive community information infrastructure | democratic involvement | democratic involvement | community development projects | community development projects | Lawrence Community Works | Lawrence Community Works | Inc. | Inc. | planning problem in the City of Lawrence | planning problem in the City of Lawrence | Massachusetts | Massachusetts | the digital divide | the digital divide | e-government | e-government | public participation | public participation | GIS | GIS | neighborhood information systems | neighborhood information systems | Lawrence Community Works | Inc. | Lawrence Community Works | Inc. | planning problem in the City of Lawrence | Massachusetts | planning problem in the City of Lawrence | Massachusetts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.129 Educational Theory and Practice I (MIT) 11.129 Educational Theory and Practice I (MIT)

Description

This course concentrates on a core set of skills and knowledge necessary for teaching in secondary schools. Topics covered in the class include educational reform, student behavior and motivation, curriculum design, and the teaching profession. Classroom observation is a key component of the class. Assignments include readings from the educational literature, written reflections on classroom observations, and practice teaching and constructing curriculum. This is the first of a three course sequence necessary to complete the Teacher Education Program. This course concentrates on a core set of skills and knowledge necessary for teaching in secondary schools. Topics covered in the class include educational reform, student behavior and motivation, curriculum design, and the teaching profession. Classroom observation is a key component of the class. Assignments include readings from the educational literature, written reflections on classroom observations, and practice teaching and constructing curriculum. This is the first of a three course sequence necessary to complete the Teacher Education Program.

Subjects

classroom experiences | classroom experiences | student-centered classroom activities | student-centered classroom activities | student-led classes | student-led classes | issues in schools and education | issues in schools and education | observing | observing | pre-college math and science classes | pre-college math and science classes | design and implementation of curriculum | design and implementation of curriculum | diversity | diversity | standards in math and science | standards in math and science | student misconceptions | student misconceptions | methods of instruction | methods of instruction | the digital divide | the digital divide | teaching through different media | teaching through different media | student assessment | student assessment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.884 Complex Digital Systems (MIT) 6.884 Complex Digital Systems (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduates and is a project-oriented course to teach new methodologies for designing multi-million-gate CMOS VLSI chips using high-level synthesis tools in conjunction with standard commercial EDA tools. The emphasis is on modular and robust designs, reusable modules, correctness by construction, architectural exploration, and meeting the area, timing, and power constraints within standard cell and FPGA frameworks. This course is offered to graduates and is a project-oriented course to teach new methodologies for designing multi-million-gate CMOS VLSI chips using high-level synthesis tools in conjunction with standard commercial EDA tools. The emphasis is on modular and robust designs, reusable modules, correctness by construction, architectural exploration, and meeting the area, timing, and power constraints within standard cell and FPGA frameworks.

Subjects

VLSI implementation | VLSI implementation | project-oriented | project-oriented | digital systems | digital systems | multi-million-gate | multi-million-gate | CMOS | CMOS | VLSI chips | VLSI chips | high-level synthesis tools | high-level synthesis tools | standard commercial EDA tools | standard commercial EDA tools | modular | modular | robust | robust | designs | designs | reusable modules | reusable modules | construction | construction | architectural exploration | architectural exploration | area | area | timing | timing | power | power | constraints | constraints | standard cell | standard cell | FPGA | FPGA | frameworks | frameworks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.092 Bioinformatics and Proteomics (MIT) 6.092 Bioinformatics and Proteomics (MIT)

Description

This interdisciplinary course provides a hands-on approach to students in the topics of bioinformatics and proteomics. Lectures and labs cover sequence analysis, microarray expression analysis, Bayesian methods, control theory, scale-free networks, and biotechnology applications. Designed for those with a computational and/or engineering background, it will include current real-world examples, actual implementations, and engineering design issues. Where applicable, engineering issues from signal processing, network theory, machine learning, robotics and other domains will be expounded upon. This interdisciplinary course provides a hands-on approach to students in the topics of bioinformatics and proteomics. Lectures and labs cover sequence analysis, microarray expression analysis, Bayesian methods, control theory, scale-free networks, and biotechnology applications. Designed for those with a computational and/or engineering background, it will include current real-world examples, actual implementations, and engineering design issues. Where applicable, engineering issues from signal processing, network theory, machine learning, robotics and other domains will be expounded upon.

Subjects

bioinformatics | bioinformatics | proteomics | proteomics | sequence analysis | sequence analysis | microarray expression analysis | microarray expression analysis | Bayesian methods | Bayesian methods | control theory | control theory | scale-free networks | scale-free networks | biotechnology applications | biotechnology applications | real-world examples | real-world examples | actual implementations | actual implementations | engineering design issues | engineering design issues | signal processing | signal processing | network theory | network theory | machine learning | machine learning | robotics | robotics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.082J Network Optimization (MIT) 15.082J Network Optimization (MIT)

Description

15.082J/6.855J is an H-level graduate subject in the theory and practice of network flows and its extensions. Network flow problems form a subclass of linear programming problems with applications to transportation, logistics, manufacturing, computer science, project management, finance as well as a number of other domains. This subject will survey some of the applications of network flows and focus on key special cases of network flow problems including the following: the shortest path problem, the maximum flow problem, the minimum cost flow problem, and the multi-commodity flow problem. 15.082J/6.855J is an H-level graduate subject in the theory and practice of network flows and its extensions. Network flow problems form a subclass of linear programming problems with applications to transportation, logistics, manufacturing, computer science, project management, finance as well as a number of other domains. This subject will survey some of the applications of network flows and focus on key special cases of network flow problems including the following: the shortest path problem, the maximum flow problem, the minimum cost flow problem, and the multi-commodity flow problem.

Subjects

network flows | network flows | extensions | extensions | network flow problems | network flow problems | transportation | transportation | logistics | logistics | manufacturing | manufacturing | computer science | computer science | project management | project management | finance | finance | the shortest path problem | the shortest path problem | the maximum flow problem | the maximum flow problem | the minimum cost flow problem | the minimum cost flow problem | the multi-commodity flow problem | the multi-commodity flow problem | communication | communication | systems | systems | applications | applications | efficiency | efficiency | algorithms | algorithms | traffic | traffic | equilibrium | equilibrium | design | design | mplementation | mplementation | linear programming | linear programming | implementation | implementation | computer | computer | science | science | linear | linear | programming | programming | network | network | flow | flow | problems | problems | project | project | management | management | maximum | maximum | minimum | minimum | cost | cost | multi-commodity | multi-commodity | shortest | shortest | path | path | 15.082 | 15.082 | 6.855 | 6.855

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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10.492-1 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Process Control by Design (MIT) 10.492-1 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Process Control by Design (MIT)

Description

In the ICE-Topics courses, various chemical engineering problems are presented and analyzed in an industrial context. Emphasis is on the integration of fundamentals with material property estimation, process control, product development, and computer simulation. Integration of societal issues, such as engineering ethics, environmental and safety considerations, and impact of technology on society are addressed in the context of case studies.The broad context for this ICE-Topics module is the commonsense notion that, when designing something, one should plan for the off-normal conditions that may occur. A continuous process is conceived and designed as a steady-state operation. However, the process must start up, shut down, and operate in the event of disturbances, and so the time-varying b In the ICE-Topics courses, various chemical engineering problems are presented and analyzed in an industrial context. Emphasis is on the integration of fundamentals with material property estimation, process control, product development, and computer simulation. Integration of societal issues, such as engineering ethics, environmental and safety considerations, and impact of technology on society are addressed in the context of case studies.The broad context for this ICE-Topics module is the commonsense notion that, when designing something, one should plan for the off-normal conditions that may occur. A continuous process is conceived and designed as a steady-state operation. However, the process must start up, shut down, and operate in the event of disturbances, and so the time-varying b

Subjects

process control | process control | heat exchanger network | heat exchanger network | design | design | shower process | shower process | continuous chemical processes | continuous chemical processes | dynamic simulation | dynamic simulation | implementation | implementation | controllers | controllers | feedback structure | feedback structure | material model | material model | energy balance model | energy balance model | linearizing equations | linearizing equations | Relative Gain Array | Relative Gain Array | Disturbance Cost | Disturbance Cost | proportional control algorithm | proportional control algorithm | steady-state model | steady-state model | numerical linearization | numerical linearization | matrix operations | matrix operations | variable pairing | variable pairing | process simulators | process simulators | design process | design process | offset phenomenon | offset phenomenon | RGA | RGA | DC | DC | heat recovery scheme | heat recovery scheme

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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