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9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT) 9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT)

Description

Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

social animals | social animals | social | social | animals | animals | society | society | human society | human society | members | members | community | community | living together | living together | mutual benefit | mutual benefit | people | people | region | region | country | country | world | world | whole | whole | association | association | body | body | individuals | individuals | functional interdependence | functional interdependence | national or cultural identity | national or cultural identity | social solidarity | social solidarity | language or hierarchical organization | language or hierarchical organization | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | groups | groups | economic | economic | social or industrial infrastructure | social or industrial infrastructure | made up of a varied collection of individuals | made up of a varied collection of individuals | ethnic groups | ethnic groups | nation state | nation state | broader cultural group | broader cultural group | organized voluntary association of people for religious | organized voluntary association of people for religious | benevolent | benevolent | cultural | cultural | scientific | scientific | political | political | patriotic | patriotic | or other purposes. | or other purposes.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.341 Individuals, Groups, and Organizations (MIT) 15.341 Individuals, Groups, and Organizations (MIT)

Description

This class develops basic concepts for understanding individual, group, and organizational behavior through the critical analysis of important works in the field. Among the areas covered are: individual affect and cognition; group process and performance; and organizational culture and adaptation. The class also emphasizes the use of behavioral science concepts for stimulating new and useful organizational behavior research. This class develops basic concepts for understanding individual, group, and organizational behavior through the critical analysis of important works in the field. Among the areas covered are: individual affect and cognition; group process and performance; and organizational culture and adaptation. The class also emphasizes the use of behavioral science concepts for stimulating new and useful organizational behavior research.

Subjects

individuals | individuals | groups | groups | organizations | organizations | individual | individual | group and organizational behavior | group and organizational behavior | individual affect and cognition | individual affect and cognition | group process and performance | group process and performance | organizational culture and adaptation | organizational culture and adaptation | behavioral science | behavioral science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT) 21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation. This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation.

Subjects

China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China | China | rice | rice | bowl | bowl | Chinese | Chinese | East Asia | East Asia | ordinary people | ordinary people | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century | personal narratives | personal narratives | primary sources | primary sources | films | films | textbook | textbook | individual | individual | family | family | lives | lives | change | change | modern | modern | readings | readings | discussions | discussions | political events | political events | daily | daily | decisions | decisions | large-scale | large-scale | social | social | transformation | transformation | 21F.191 | 21F.191 | 21F.991 | 21F.991

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.810 Topics in Philosophy of Science: Social Science (MIT) 24.810 Topics in Philosophy of Science: Social Science (MIT)

Description

This course offers an advanced survey of current debates about the ontology, methodology, and aims of the social sciences. This course offers an advanced survey of current debates about the ontology, methodology, and aims of the social sciences.

Subjects

Ontology | Ontology | methodology | methodology | social science | social science | human being | human being | human behavior | human behavior | social structure | social structure | practices | practices | norms | norms | institutions | institutions | individual | individual | society | society | mental state | mental state | values | values | theory | theory | objectivity | objectivity | reductionism | reductionism | individualism | individualism | holism | holism | prediction | prediction | laws | laws | explanation | explanation | rational choice | rational choice | functional | functional

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.225J Violence, Human Rights, and Justice (MIT) 21A.225J Violence, Human Rights, and Justice (MIT)

Description

This course examines the contemporary problem of political violence and the way that human rights have been conceived as a means to protect and promote freedom, peace and justice for citizens against the abuses of the state. This course examines the contemporary problem of political violence and the way that human rights have been conceived as a means to protect and promote freedom, peace and justice for citizens against the abuses of the state.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | political | political | violence | violence | human rights | human rights | freedom | freedom | peace | peace | justice | justice | citizens | citizens | state | state | historical debates | historical debates | cultural | cultural | natural | natural | western European | western European | moral values | moral values | differences | differences | culture | culture | religion | religion | gender | gender | relationships | relationships | individuals | individuals | collective groups | collective groups | ethnography | ethnography | case studies | case studies | conflict | conflict | globe | globe | war crimes tribunals | war crimes tribunals | truth commissions | truth commissions | individual | individual | collective | collective | traumas | traumas | rule of law | rule of law | representative governance | representative governance | 21A.225 | 21A.225 | SP.621 | SP.621

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.225J Violence, Human Rights, and Justice (MIT) 21A.225J Violence, Human Rights, and Justice (MIT)

Description

This course examines the contemporary problem of political violence and the way that human rights have been conceived as a means to protect and promote freedom, peace and justice for citizens against the abuses of the state. This course examines the contemporary problem of political violence and the way that human rights have been conceived as a means to protect and promote freedom, peace and justice for citizens against the abuses of the state.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | political | political | violence | violence | human rights | human rights | freedom | freedom | peace | peace | justice | justice | citizens | citizens | state | state | historical debates | historical debates | cultural | cultural | natural | natural | western European | western European | moral values | moral values | differences | differences | culture | culture | religion | religion | gender | gender | relationships | relationships | individuals | individuals | collective groups | collective groups | ethnography | ethnography | case studies | case studies | conflict | conflict | globe | globe | war crimes tribunals | war crimes tribunals | truth commissions | truth commissions | individual | individual | collective | collective | traumas | traumas | rule of law | rule of law | representative governance | representative governance | 21A.225 | 21A.225 | SP.621 | SP.621

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.037 American Political Thought (MIT) 17.037 American Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research. This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research.

Subjects

american politics | american politics | united states | united states | political theory | political theory | colonial | colonial | contemporary government | contemporary government | national identity | national identity | individual rights | individual rights | liberalism | liberalism | activism | activism | repulicanism | repulicanism | radicalism | radicalism | revolution | revolution | equality | equality | freedom | freedom | protestants | protestants | protestantism | protestantism | colonial america | colonial america | american revolution | american revolution | debate | debate | constitution | constitution | jeffersonian republicans | jeffersonian republicans | hamiltonian federalists | hamiltonian federalists | madison | madison | individualism | individualism | antebellum america | antebellum america | racism | racism | nativism | nativism | sexism | sexism | new inegalitarians | new inegalitarians | politics of inclusion | politics of inclusion | politics of difference | politics of difference | markets | markets | morals | morals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT)

Description

Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

social animals | social | animals | society | human society | members | community | living together | mutual benefit | people | region | country | world | whole | association | body | individuals | functional interdependence | national or cultural identity | social solidarity | language or hierarchical organization | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | groups | economic | social or industrial infrastructure | made up of a varied collection of individuals | ethnic groups | nation state | broader cultural group | organized voluntary association of people for religious | benevolent | cultural | scientific | political | patriotic | or other purposes.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.341 Individuals, Groups, and Organizations (MIT)

Description

This class develops basic concepts for understanding individual, group, and organizational behavior through the critical analysis of important works in the field. Among the areas covered are: individual affect and cognition; group process and performance; and organizational culture and adaptation. The class also emphasizes the use of behavioral science concepts for stimulating new and useful organizational behavior research.

Subjects

individuals | groups | organizations | individual | group and organizational behavior | individual affect and cognition | group process and performance | organizational culture and adaptation | behavioral science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation.

Subjects

China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China | rice | bowl | Chinese | East Asia | ordinary people | nineteenth century | twentieth century | personal narratives | primary sources | films | textbook | individual | family | lives | change | modern | readings | discussions | political events | daily | decisions | large-scale | social | transformation | 21F.191 | 21F.991

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.225J Violence, Human Rights, and Justice (MIT)

Description

This course examines the contemporary problem of political violence and the way that human rights have been conceived as a means to protect and promote freedom, peace and justice for citizens against the abuses of the state.

Subjects

Anthropology | political | violence | human rights | freedom | peace | justice | citizens | state | historical debates | cultural | natural | western European | moral values | differences | culture | religion | gender | relationships | individuals | collective groups | ethnography | case studies | conflict | globe | war crimes tribunals | truth commissions | individual | collective | traumas | rule of law | representative governance | 21A.225 | SP.621

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges. This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | market | optimization | optimization | allocation | allocation | economic measurement | economic measurement | analysis | analysis | microeconomics | microeconomics | demand | demand | supply | supply | equilibrium | equilibrium | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | consumer preference | consumer preference | utility functions | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | budget constraints | interior solutions | interior solutions | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | Engle curves | individual demand | individual demand | market demand | market demand | revealed preferences | revealed preferences | substitution effect | substitution effect | income effect | income effect | Giffen goods | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | Irish potato famine | network externalities | network externalities | uncertainty | uncertainty | preference toward risk | preference toward risk | risk premium | risk premium | indifference curves | indifference curves | diversification | diversification | insurance | insurance | producer theory | producer theory | production functions | production functions | short run | short run | long run | long run | returns to scale | returns to scale | cost functions | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scale | economies of scope | economies of scope | learning | learning | profit maximization | profit maximization | producer surplus | producer surplus | agricultural price support | agricultural price support | tax | tax | subsidy | subsidy | exchange economy | exchange economy | contract curves | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | efficiency | monopoly | monopoly | multiplant firm | multiplant firm | social cost | social cost | price regulation | price regulation | monopsony | monopsony | price discrimination | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | two-part tariffs | bundling | bundling | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | game theory | game theory | oligopoly | oligopoly | Cournot | Cournot | Stackelberg | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.002-3 Foundations of Western Culture II: Modernism (MIT) 21L.002-3 Foundations of Western Culture II: Modernism (MIT)

Description

This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice an This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice an

Subjects

Western culture | Western culture | foundations | foundations | modernism | modernism | texts | texts | literary | literary | philosophical | philosophical | sociological | sociological | secular humanism | secular humanism | human events | human events | individual | individual | social | social | communal purpose | communal purpose | common | common | cultural | cultural | possession | possession | ancient | ancient | modern world | modern world | discussion | discussion | action | action | characters | characters | voice | voice | form | form

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.09 Minds and Machines (MIT) 24.09 Minds and Machines (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind.

Subjects

Searle | Searle | AI | AI | Turing Test | Turing Test | dualism | dualism | behaviorism | behaviorism | identity theory | identity theory | Kripke | Kripke | functionalism | functionalism | intentionality | intentionality | externalism | externalism | perception | perception | self-knowledge | self-knowledge | knowledge argument | knowledge argument | Chalmers | Chalmers | Nagel | Nagel | panprotopsychism | panprotopsychism | mysterianism | mysterianism | consciousness | consciousness | rene descartes | rene descartes | mind | mind | brain | brain | causal theory | causal theory | pain | pain | relief | relief | meaning | meaning | individualism | individualism | qualia | qualia | mind-body problem | mind-body problem | free will | free will

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory and is the first course in the microeconomic theory series. It is intended for graduate students in the economics program. Some components of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know while others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics of recent interest will also be covered and may include: theories of production and individual choice (under certainty and uncertainty); markets and competition; tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. This course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory and is the first course in the microeconomic theory series. It is intended for graduate students in the economics program. Some components of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know while others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics of recent interest will also be covered and may include: theories of production and individual choice (under certainty and uncertainty); markets and competition; tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | theories of production and individual choice (under certainty and uncertainty) | theories of production and individual choice (under certainty and uncertainty) | markets and competition | markets and competition | tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory | tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.037 American Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research.

Subjects

american politics | united states | political theory | colonial | contemporary government | national identity | individual rights | liberalism | activism | repulicanism | radicalism | revolution | equality | freedom | protestants | protestantism | colonial america | american revolution | debate | constitution | jeffersonian republicans | hamiltonian federalists | madison | individualism | antebellum america | racism | nativism | sexism | new inegalitarians | politics of inclusion | politics of difference | markets | morals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.500 Topics in Philosophy of Mind: Self-Knowledge (MIT) 24.500 Topics in Philosophy of Mind: Self-Knowledge (MIT)

Description

This is a seminar on "self-knowledge" -- knowledge of one's own mental states. In addition to reading some of the classic papers on self-knowledge, we will look at some very recent work on the topic. There will be no lectures. Each week I will spend half an hour or so introducing the assigned reading, and the rest of the time will be devoted to discussion. This is a seminar on "self-knowledge" -- knowledge of one's own mental states. In addition to reading some of the classic papers on self-knowledge, we will look at some very recent work on the topic. There will be no lectures. Each week I will spend half an hour or so introducing the assigned reading, and the rest of the time will be devoted to discussion.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | transparency | transparency | mind | mind | self-knowledge | self-knowledge | mental states | mental states | externalist | externalist | individualism | individualism | warrant transmission | warrant transmission | misidentification | misidentification | self-identification | self-identification | expressivism | expressivism | neo-expressivism | neo-expressivism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.269 Leadership Stories: Literature, Ethics, and Authority (MIT) 15.269 Leadership Stories: Literature, Ethics, and Authority (MIT)

Description

This course explores how we use story to articulate ethical norms. The syllabus consists of short fiction, novels, plays, feature films and some non-fiction. Major topics include leadership and authority, professionalism, the nature of ethical standards, social enterprise, and questions of gender, cultural and individual identity, and work / life balance. Materials vary from year to year, but past readings have included work by Robert Bolt, Michael Frayn, Timothy Mo, Wole Soyinka, H. D. Thoreau, and others; films have included Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Hotel Rwanda, The Descendants, Motorcycle Diaries, Three Kings, and others. Draws on various professions and national cultures, and is run as a series of moderated discussions, with students centrally engaged in the teaching process. This course explores how we use story to articulate ethical norms. The syllabus consists of short fiction, novels, plays, feature films and some non-fiction. Major topics include leadership and authority, professionalism, the nature of ethical standards, social enterprise, and questions of gender, cultural and individual identity, and work / life balance. Materials vary from year to year, but past readings have included work by Robert Bolt, Michael Frayn, Timothy Mo, Wole Soyinka, H. D. Thoreau, and others; films have included Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Hotel Rwanda, The Descendants, Motorcycle Diaries, Three Kings, and others. Draws on various professions and national cultures, and is run as a series of moderated discussions, with students centrally engaged in the teaching process.

Subjects

ethics in society | ethics in society | authority | authority | leadership | leadership | social enterprise | social enterprise | literature | literature | film | film | moral compass | moral compass | diversity | diversity | individual values | individual values | story and management | story and management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Between Collectivism and Individualism

Description

The Reflection of the Israeli-German Relationship in Israeli Dance from the 1970s till Nowadays. Dana Mills, DPhil candidate in Political Theory, University of Oxford gives a talk for the OTJR seminar series, introduced by Phil Clark. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Israel | collectivism | dance | Germany | art | politics | individualism | Israel | collectivism | dance | Germany | art | politics | individualism | 2011-06-21

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21A.225J Violence, Human Rights, and Justice (MIT)

Description

This course examines the contemporary problem of political violence and the way that human rights have been conceived as a means to protect and promote freedom, peace and justice for citizens against the abuses of the state.

Subjects

Anthropology | political | violence | human rights | freedom | peace | justice | citizens | state | historical debates | cultural | natural | western European | moral values | differences | culture | religion | gender | relationships | individuals | collective groups | ethnography | case studies | conflict | globe | war crimes tribunals | truth commissions | individual | collective | traumas | rule of law | representative governance | 21A.225 | SP.621

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture: The Making of the Modern World (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture: The Making of the Modern World (MIT)

Description

This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice and form. This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice and form.

Subjects

Western culture | Western culture | foundations | foundations | modernism | modernism | texts | texts | literary | literary | philosophical | philosophical | sociological | sociological | secular humanism | secular humanism | human events | human events | individual | individual | social | social | communal purpose | communal purpose | common | common | cultural | cultural | possession | possession | ancient | ancient | modern world | modern world | discussion | discussion | action | action | characters | characters | voice | voice | form | form

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.75J Psychology of Gender (MIT) 9.75J Psychology of Gender (MIT)

Description

We will examine current research and theory regarding the validity and utility of commonly accepted gender differences in many realms. Topics include: gender differences in cognitive abilities; the social construction of gender; developmental, family, educational and medical influences; and political and economic forces. We will examine current research and theory regarding the validity and utility of commonly accepted gender differences in many realms. Topics include: gender differences in cognitive abilities; the social construction of gender; developmental, family, educational and medical influences; and political and economic forces.

Subjects

individual | individual | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | gender | gender | gender development | gender development | gender differences | gender differences | cognition | cognition | emotion | emotion | gender stereotypes | gender stereotypes | mental health | mental health | sexuality | sexuality | close relationships | close relationships | work | work | 9.75 | 9.75

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.269 Literature, Ethics, Authority (MIT) 15.269 Literature, Ethics, Authority (MIT)

Description

Literature, Ethics, and Authority uses story in the form of readings and movies to address the relationship between ethics and leadership. The course covers a range of topics, from issues of diversity and gender in the workplace to coping with the human realities of war and death. The course syllabus includes short stories, novels, plays, works of non-fiction, and films, and is representative of many different cultures and nationalities. This class is taught as a seminar to encourage discussion of these issues. Literature, Ethics, and Authority uses story in the form of readings and movies to address the relationship between ethics and leadership. The course covers a range of topics, from issues of diversity and gender in the workplace to coping with the human realities of war and death. The course syllabus includes short stories, novels, plays, works of non-fiction, and films, and is representative of many different cultures and nationalities. This class is taught as a seminar to encourage discussion of these issues.

Subjects

ethics in society | ethics in society | authority | authority | leadership | leadership | social enterprise | social enterprise | literature | literature | film | film | moral compass | moral compass | diversity | diversity | individual values | individual values | story and management | story and management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.512 Genomic Medicine (MIT) HST.512 Genomic Medicine (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course reviews the key genomic technologies and computational approaches that are driving advances in prognostics, diagnostics, and treatment. Throughout the semester, emphasis will return to issues surrounding the context of genomics in medicine including: what does a physician need to know? what sorts of questions will s/he likely encounter from patients? how should s/he respond? Lecturers will guide the student through real world patient-doctor interactions. Outcome considerations and socioeconomic implications of personalized medicine are also discussed. The first part of the course introduces key basic concepts of molecular biology, computational biology, and genomics. Continuing in the informatics applications portion of the course, lec Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course reviews the key genomic technologies and computational approaches that are driving advances in prognostics, diagnostics, and treatment. Throughout the semester, emphasis will return to issues surrounding the context of genomics in medicine including: what does a physician need to know? what sorts of questions will s/he likely encounter from patients? how should s/he respond? Lecturers will guide the student through real world patient-doctor interactions. Outcome considerations and socioeconomic implications of personalized medicine are also discussed. The first part of the course introduces key basic concepts of molecular biology, computational biology, and genomics. Continuing in the informatics applications portion of the course, lec

Subjects

genomics | genomics | genomic medicine | genomic medicine | genetics | genetics | genomic measurement | genomic measurement | microarray | microarray | informatics | informatics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | computational biology | computational biology | machine learning | machine learning | pharmacogenomics | pharmacogenomics | complex traits | complex traits | individual pharmacology | individual pharmacology | cancer diagnostics | cancer diagnostics | genetic disease | genetic disease | biomedical | biomedical | genomes | genomes | bioethics | bioethics | integrative genomics | integrative genomics | genomic technologies | genomic technologies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.75J Psychology of Gender (MIT) 9.75J Psychology of Gender (MIT)

Description

We will examine current research and theory regarding the validity and utility of commonly accepted gender differences in many realms. Topics include: gender differences in cognitive abilities; the social construction of gender; developmental, family, educational and medical influences; and political and economic forces. We will examine current research and theory regarding the validity and utility of commonly accepted gender differences in many realms. Topics include: gender differences in cognitive abilities; the social construction of gender; developmental, family, educational and medical influences; and political and economic forces.

Subjects

individual | individual | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | gender | gender | gender development | gender development | gender differences | gender differences | cognition | cognition | emotion | emotion | gender stereotypes | gender stereotypes | mental health | mental health | sexuality | sexuality | close relationships | close relationships | work | work | 9.75 | 9.75

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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