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17.196 Globalization (MIT) 17.196 Globalization (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined. This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined.

Subjects

international economy | international economy | domestic politics | domestic politics | economy | economy | and society | and society | globalization | globalization | wages | wages | inequality; social safety nets | inequality; social safety nets | production | production | innovation | innovation | developed countries | developed countries | developing countries | developing countries | democracy. | democracy. | democracy | democracy | inequality | inequality | social safety nets | social safety nets | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.156 Differential Analysis II: Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Analysis (MIT) 18.156 Differential Analysis II: Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Analysis (MIT)

Description

In this course, we study elliptic Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) with variable coefficients building up to the minimal surface equation. Then we study Fourier and harmonic analysis, emphasizing applications of Fourier analysis. We will see some applications in combinatorics / number theory, like the Gauss circle problem, but mostly focus on applications in PDE, like the Calderon-Zygmund inequality for the Laplacian, and the Strichartz inequality for the Schrodinger equation. In the last part of the course, we study solutions to the linear and the non-linear Schrodinger equation. All through the course, we work on the craft of proving estimates.   In this course, we study elliptic Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) with variable coefficients building up to the minimal surface equation. Then we study Fourier and harmonic analysis, emphasizing applications of Fourier analysis. We will see some applications in combinatorics / number theory, like the Gauss circle problem, but mostly focus on applications in PDE, like the Calderon-Zygmund inequality for the Laplacian, and the Strichartz inequality for the Schrodinger equation. In the last part of the course, we study solutions to the linear and the non-linear Schrodinger equation. All through the course, we work on the craft of proving estimates.  

Subjects

elliptic PDE | elliptic PDE | dispersive PDE | dispersive PDE | Fourier analysis | Fourier analysis | Fourier transform | Fourier transform | Fourier inversion theorem | Fourier inversion theorem | Plancherel theorem | Plancherel theorem | Schauder inequality | Schauder inequality | Strichartz inequality | Strichartz inequality | Sobolev spaces | Sobolev spaces | Gauss circle problem | Gauss circle problem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.196 Globalization (MIT) 17.196 Globalization (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined. This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined.

Subjects

international economy | international economy | domestic politics | domestic politics | economy | economy | and society | and society | globalization | globalization | wages | wages | inequality; social safety nets | inequality; social safety nets | production | production | innovation | innovation | developed countries | developed countries | developing countries | developing countries | democracy. | democracy. | democracy | democracy | inequality | inequality | social safety nets | social safety nets | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Wellbeing and Inequality in Post-Industrial Society

Description

The Annual Ralf Dahrendorf Memorial Lecture is delivered by a leading thinker on a subject related to Ralf Dahrendorf's concerns. This inaugural (2010) Ralf Dahrendorf Memorial Lecture was delivered by Lord (Adair) Turner. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

s | dahrendorf | freedom | political | inequality | social | thinkers | s | freedom | political | inequality | social | thinkers | 2010-04-30

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Democracy, Development and Income Distribution Democracy, Development and Income Distribution

Description

In this dense and absorbing review, Professor Ben Ansell explains how past and current models have failed to capture the paradox that development may lead to greater income inequality. He explores the roles of actors and structures in his own approach to the study of this relationship and casts a critical light on the plight of those who live in poverty despite democratization. Turning to the other end of the income spectrum, he discusses the global trend towards capital mobility and how it relates and affects different political systems. Overall, Inequality and Democratization raises a number of critical and highly relevant questions concerning the relationship between political systems and income distribution. The post Democracy, Development and Income Distribution appeared first on OxPo In this dense and absorbing review, Professor Ben Ansell explains how past and current models have failed to capture the paradox that development may lead to greater income inequality. He explores the roles of actors and structures in his own approach to the study of this relationship and casts a critical light on the plight of those who live in poverty despite democratization. Turning to the other end of the income spectrum, he discusses the global trend towards capital mobility and how it relates and affects different political systems. Overall, Inequality and Democratization raises a number of critical and highly relevant questions concerning the relationship between political systems and income distribution. The post Democracy, Development and Income Distribution appeared first on OxPo

Subjects

Book Reviews | Book Reviews | Democracy | Democracy | Development | Development | inequality | inequality | Political Economy | Political Economy

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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18.156 Differential Analysis II: Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Analysis (MIT)

Description

In this course, we study elliptic Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) with variable coefficients building up to the minimal surface equation. Then we study Fourier and harmonic analysis, emphasizing applications of Fourier analysis. We will see some applications in combinatorics / number theory, like the Gauss circle problem, but mostly focus on applications in PDE, like the Calderon-Zygmund inequality for the Laplacian, and the Strichartz inequality for the Schrodinger equation. In the last part of the course, we study solutions to the linear and the non-linear Schrodinger equation. All through the course, we work on the craft of proving estimates.  

Subjects

elliptic PDE | dispersive PDE | Fourier analysis | Fourier transform | Fourier inversion theorem | Plancherel theorem | Schauder inequality | Strichartz inequality | Sobolev spaces | Gauss circle problem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.20 Introduction to American Politics (MIT) 17.20 Introduction to American Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides a substantive overview of U.S. politics and an introduction to the discipline of political science. It surveys the institutional foundations of U.S. politics as well as the activities of political elites, organizations, and ordinary citizens. It also explores the application of general political science concepts and analytic frameworks to specific episodes and phenomena in U.S. politics. This course provides a substantive overview of U.S. politics and an introduction to the discipline of political science. It surveys the institutional foundations of U.S. politics as well as the activities of political elites, organizations, and ordinary citizens. It also explores the application of general political science concepts and analytic frameworks to specific episodes and phenomena in U.S. politics.

Subjects

American politics | American politics | The Constitution | The Constitution | politicians | politicians | Congress | Congress | the Presidency | the Presidency | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | judiciary | judiciary | federalism | federalism | public opinion | public opinion | political parties | political parties | partisanship | partisanship | choice | choice | campaigns | campaigns | elections | elections | policy | policy | political geography | political geography | polarization | polarization | extremism | extremism | organized interests | organized interests | economic inequality | economic inequality | race | race | immigration | immigration | multiculturalism | multiculturalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.725 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT) SP.725 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing. D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing.

Subjects

global health | global health | medicine | medicine | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | disease | disease | disease prevention | disease prevention | vaccine | vaccine | immunization | immunization | drug | drug | health diagnostic | health diagnostic | medical informatics | medical informatics | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device | medical device | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | co-creation | co-creation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Wellbeing and Inequality in Post-Industrial Society

Description

The Annual Ralf Dahrendorf Memorial Lecture is delivered by a leading thinker on a subject related to Ralf Dahrendorf's concerns. This inaugural (2010) Ralf Dahrendorf Memorial Lecture was delivered by Lord (Adair) Turner. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

s | dahrendorf | freedom | political | inequality | social | thinkers | s | freedom | political | inequality | social | thinkers | 2010-04-30

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Sex in a Shifting Landscape Lecture Two:Oxford Uehiro Lectures 2012

Description

Second lecture in the 2012 Uehiro Lecture series 'Sex in A Shifting Landscape'. After a hundred and fifty years of feminism, we are still struggling to achieve a satisfactory legal and social framework for managing the relations of the sexes. This is partly, of course, because so many men have been unwilling to give up their traditional privileges, and the original feminist project is still far from finished. But more fundamentally than that, we have no clear conception of what a fair arrangement would be. You can regard some kinds of inequality as definitely unjust while being in considerable doubt about others. And even if we ever thought we had reached an ideal solution, the endlessly shifting landscape of technological change would soon throw things into turmoil. Reproductive technol Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

uehiro | climate change | philosophy | inequality | sexism | emancipation | ethics | feminism | uehiro | climate change | philosophy | inequality | sexism | emancipation | ethics | feminism | 2012-11-21

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered. This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | demand theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | competitive markets | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | externalities | externalities | Afriat's theorem | Afriat's theorem | pricing | pricing | robust comparative statics | robust comparative statics | utility theory | utility theory | properties of preferences | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | choice as primitive | revealed preference | revealed preference | classical demand theory | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | integrability | demand aggregation | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | and demand estimation | increasing differences | increasing differences | producer theory applications | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | simple models of externalities | government intervention | government intervention | Coase theorem | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | uncertainty | common property externalities | common property externalities | optimization | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | Microfoundations | core | core | core convergence | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | marriage markets | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | existence of stable matchings | incentives | incentives | housing markets core mechanism | housing markets core mechanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.71 Economic History of Financial Crises (MIT) 14.71 Economic History of Financial Crises (MIT)

Description

This course gives a historical perspective on financial panics. Topics include the growth of the industrial world, the Great Depression and surrounding events, and more recent topics such as the first oil crisis, Japanese stagnation, and conditions following the financial crisis of 2008. This course gives a historical perspective on financial panics. Topics include the growth of the industrial world, the Great Depression and surrounding events, and more recent topics such as the first oil crisis, Japanese stagnation, and conditions following the financial crisis of 2008.

Subjects

economic history | economic history | financial crises | financial crises | industrialization | industrialization | World War I | World War I | depression | depression | recovery | recovery | World War II | World War II | the Golden Age | the Golden Age | income inequality | income inequality | oil crises | oil crises | 1970s | 1970s | Japanese growth and stagnation | Japanese growth and stagnation | small crises | small crises | imbalance | imbalance | 2008 crisis | 2008 crisis | 2009 crisis | 2009 crisis | 1930s | 1930s | 1940s | 1940s

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.196 Globalization (MIT) 17.196 Globalization (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined. This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined.

Subjects

international economy | international economy | domestic politics | domestic politics | economy | economy | and society | and society | globalization | globalization | wages | wages | nequality | nequality | inequality | inequality | social safety nets | social safety nets | production | production | innovation | innovation | developed countries | developed countries | developing countries | developing countries | democracy | democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.731 Economic History (MIT) 14.731 Economic History (MIT)

Description

This course is a survey of world economic history, and it introduces economics students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. It is designed to expand the range of empirical settings in students' research by drawing upon historical material and long-run data. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. The emphasis will be on questions related to labor markets and economic growth. This course is a survey of world economic history, and it introduces economics students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. It is designed to expand the range of empirical settings in students' research by drawing upon historical material and long-run data. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. The emphasis will be on questions related to labor markets and economic growth.

Subjects

Economic History | Economic History | industrialization | industrialization | demographic change | demographic change | policies | policies | Applied Economics | Applied Economics | formulate and test hypotheses | formulate and test hypotheses | labor history | labor history | discrimination | discrimination | technology | technology | institutions | institutions | financial crises | financial crises | migration | migration | recovery after shocks | recovery after shocks | wages | wages | inequality | inequality | health | health | stock market regulation | stock market regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.771 Development Economics: Microeconomic Issues and Policy Models (MIT) 14.771 Development Economics: Microeconomic Issues and Policy Models (MIT)

Description

Topics include productivity effects of health, private and social returns to education, education quality, education policy and market equilibrium, gender discrimination, public finance, decision making within families, firms and contracts, technology, labor and migration, land, and the markets for credit and savings. Topics include productivity effects of health, private and social returns to education, education quality, education policy and market equilibrium, gender discrimination, public finance, decision making within families, firms and contracts, technology, labor and migration, land, and the markets for credit and savings.

Subjects

productivity | productivity | health | health | education | education | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | public finance | public finance | decision making | decision making | families | families | firms | firms | contracts | contracts | technology | technology | labor | labor | migration | migration | land | land | credit | credit | savings | savings | poverty | poverty | inequality | inequality | nutrition | nutrition | school choice | school choice | school vouchers | school vouchers | subsidies | subsidies | taxes | taxes | employment | employment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Globalisation, Inequality, and the State

Description

Thomas Pogge (Yale University) presents this lecture as part of the Anglo-German 'State of the State' Fellowship Programme, given by on May 24th, 2011. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

government | state of the state | inequality | poverty | politics | globalisation | government | state of the state | inequality | poverty | politics | globalisation | 2011-05-24

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.196 Globalization (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined.

Subjects

international economy | domestic politics | economy | and society | globalization | wages | inequality; social safety nets | production | innovation | developed countries | developing countries | democracy. | democracy | inequality | social safety nets | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.S096 Topics in Mathematics of Data Science (MIT) 18.S096 Topics in Mathematics of Data Science (MIT)

Description

This is a mostly self-contained research-oriented course designed for undergraduate students (but also extremely welcoming to graduate students) with an interest in doing research in theoretical aspects of algorithms that aim to extract information from data. These often lie in overlaps of two or more of the following: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Statistics, and / or Operations Research. This is a mostly self-contained research-oriented course designed for undergraduate students (but also extremely welcoming to graduate students) with an interest in doing research in theoretical aspects of algorithms that aim to extract information from data. These often lie in overlaps of two or more of the following: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Statistics, and / or Operations Research.

Subjects

Principal Component Analysis (PCA) | Principal Component Analysis (PCA) | random matrix theory | random matrix theory | spike model | spike model | manifold learning | manifold learning | Diffusion Maps | Diffusion Maps | Sobolev Embedding Theorem | Sobolev Embedding Theorem | Spectral Clustering | Spectral Clustering | Cheeger’s inequality | Cheeger’s inequality | Mesh Theorem | Mesh Theorem | Number Theory | Number Theory | Approximation algorithms | Approximation algorithms | Max-Cut problem | Max-Cut problem | Stochastic Block Model | Stochastic Block Model | Synchronization | Synchronization | inverse problems | inverse problems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.139 The City in Film (MIT) 11.139 The City in Film (MIT)

Description

Using film as a lens to explore and interpret various aspects of the urban experience in both the U.S. and abroad, this course presents a survey of important developments in urbanism from 1900 to the present day, including changes in technology, bureaucracy, and industrialization; immigration and national identity; race, class, gender, and economic inequality; politics, conformity, and urban anomie; and planning, development, private property, displacement, sprawl, environmental degradation, and suburbanization. Using film as a lens to explore and interpret various aspects of the urban experience in both the U.S. and abroad, this course presents a survey of important developments in urbanism from 1900 to the present day, including changes in technology, bureaucracy, and industrialization; immigration and national identity; race, class, gender, and economic inequality; politics, conformity, and urban anomie; and planning, development, private property, displacement, sprawl, environmental degradation, and suburbanization.

Subjects

cities | cities | urban | urban | urban experience | urban experience | urbanism | urbanism | development | development | technology | technology | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | industrialization | industrialization | immigration | immigration | national identity | national identity | race | race | class | class | gender | gender | economic inequality | economic inequality | politics | politics | conformity | conformity | urban anomie | urban anomie | planning | planning | private property | private property | displacement | displacement | sprawl | sprawl | environmental degradation | environmental degradation | suburbanization | suburbanization | metropolis | metropolis | berlin symphony of a great city | berlin symphony of a great city | the crowd | the crowd | modern times | modern times | ladri di biciclette | ladri di biciclette | bicycle thieves | bicycle thieves | the naked city | the naked city | west side story | west side story | play time | play time | midnight cowboy | midnight cowboy | blade runner | blade runner | do the right thing | do the right thing | london | london | night on earth | night on earth

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice. This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice.

Subjects

urban sociology | urban sociology | social change | social change | urbanism | urbanism | urban growth | urban growth | environmental sociology | environmental sociology | human ecology | human ecology | underclass | underclass | social inequality | social inequality | political power | political power | socio-spatial change | socio-spatial change | built environment | built environment | race and politics | race and politics | political economy | political economy | urban villages | urban villages | globalization | globalization | social justice | social justice | community | community | social networks | social networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.152 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations (MIT) 18.152 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations (MIT)

Description

This course provides a solid introduction to Partial Differential Equations for advanced undergraduate students. The focus is on linear second order uniformly elliptic and parabolic equations. This course provides a solid introduction to Partial Differential Equations for advanced undergraduate students. The focus is on linear second order uniformly elliptic and parabolic equations.

Subjects

Harmonic functions | Harmonic functions | Harnack inequality | Harnack inequality | gradient estimate | gradient estimate | Hopf Maximum Principle | Hopf Maximum Principle | Poincare Inequalities | Poincare Inequalities | Cacciopolli Inequality | Cacciopolli Inequality | Dirichlet problem | Dirichlet problem | Campanato's lemma | Campanato's lemma | Morrey's lemma | Morrey's lemma | Moser's Approach | Moser's Approach

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.318 Topics in Algebraic Combinatorics (MIT) 18.318 Topics in Algebraic Combinatorics (MIT)

Description

The course consists of a sampling of topics from algebraic combinatorics. The topics include the matrix-tree theorem and other applications of linear algebra, applications of commutative and exterior algebra to counting faces of simplicial complexes, and applications of algebra to tilings. The course consists of a sampling of topics from algebraic combinatorics. The topics include the matrix-tree theorem and other applications of linear algebra, applications of commutative and exterior algebra to counting faces of simplicial complexes, and applications of algebra to tilings.

Subjects

algebraic combinatorics | algebraic combinatorics | matrix-tree theorem | matrix-tree theorem | linear algebra | linear algebra | commutative algebra | commutative algebra | exterior algebra | exterior algebra | counting faces of simplicial complexes | counting faces of simplicial complexes | tilings | tilings | Young's lattice | Young's lattice | Shannon capacity | Shannon capacity | Fisher inequality | Fisher inequality | Hadamard matrices | Hadamard matrices | f-vectors | f-vectors | Sperner Property | Sperner Property | -Binomial Coeffcients | -Binomial Coeffcients

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.126J Economics of Education (MIT) 11.126J Economics of Education (MIT)

Description

This class discusses the economic aspects of current issues in education, using both economic theory and econometric and institutional readings. Topics include discussion of basic human capital theory, the growing impact of education on earnings and earnings inequality, statistical issues in determining the true rate of return to education, the labor market for teachers, implications of the impact of computers on the demand for worker skills, the effectiveness of mid-career training for adult workers, the roles of school choice, charter schools, state standards and educational technology in improving K-12 education, and the issue of college financial aid. This class discusses the economic aspects of current issues in education, using both economic theory and econometric and institutional readings. Topics include discussion of basic human capital theory, the growing impact of education on earnings and earnings inequality, statistical issues in determining the true rate of return to education, the labor market for teachers, implications of the impact of computers on the demand for worker skills, the effectiveness of mid-career training for adult workers, the roles of school choice, charter schools, state standards and educational technology in improving K-12 education, and the issue of college financial aid.

Subjects

economics of education | economics of education | economic aspect | economic aspect | econometric | econometric | basic human capital theory | basic human capital theory | earnings and earnings inequality | earnings and earnings inequality | statistical issues | statistical issues | rate of return to education | rate of return to education | labor market for teachers | labor market for teachers | impact of computers | impact of computers | demand for worker skills | demand for worker skills | mid-career training | mid-career training | school choice | school choice | educational technology | educational technology | financial aid | financial aid

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.440 Probability and Random Variables (MIT) 18.440 Probability and Random Variables (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to probability and random variables. Topics include distribution functions, binomial, geometric, hypergeometric, and Poisson distributions. The other topics covered are uniform, exponential, normal, gamma and beta distributions; conditional probability; Bayes theorem; joint distributions; Chebyshev inequality; law of large numbers; and central limit theorem. This course introduces students to probability and random variables. Topics include distribution functions, binomial, geometric, hypergeometric, and Poisson distributions. The other topics covered are uniform, exponential, normal, gamma and beta distributions; conditional probability; Bayes theorem; joint distributions; Chebyshev inequality; law of large numbers; and central limit theorem.

Subjects

Probability spaces | Probability spaces | random variables | random variables | distribution functions | distribution functions | Binomial | Binomial | geometric | geometric | hypergeometric | hypergeometric | Poisson distributions | Poisson distributions | Uniform | Uniform | exponential | exponential | normal | normal | gamma and beta distributions | gamma and beta distributions | Conditional probability | Conditional probability | Bayes theorem | Bayes theorem | joint distributions | joint distributions | Chebyshev inequality | Chebyshev inequality | law of large numbers | law of large numbers | And central limit theorem | And central limit theorem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.263 U.S. National Elections (MIT) 17.263 U.S. National Elections (MIT)

Description

This course provides a selective overview of electoral politics in the United States, with an emphasis on presidential and congressional elections. It examines the macro-level determinants of electoral outcomes as well as the political behavior of individual Americans. Each week covers a different topic, with readings designed to highlight controversies or debates in the political science literature. This course provides a selective overview of electoral politics in the United States, with an emphasis on presidential and congressional elections. It examines the macro-level determinants of electoral outcomes as well as the political behavior of individual Americans. Each week covers a different topic, with readings designed to highlight controversies or debates in the political science literature.

Subjects

election | election | barack obama | barack obama | mitt romney | mitt romney | hillary clinton | hillary clinton | political geography | political geography | realignment | realignment | political parties | political parties | democrat | democrat | republican | republican | incumbency advantage | incumbency advantage | electoral college | electoral college | partisan | partisan | demographics | demographics | campaigns | campaigns | constituencies | constituencies | voters | voters | voting | voting | gridlock | gridlock | campaign finance reform | campaign finance reform | lobbying | lobbying | campaign spending | campaign spending | citizens united | citizens united | referendums | referendums | turnout | turnout | representation | representation | governance | governance | government | government | inequality | inequality | gerrymandering | gerrymandering | redistricting | redistricting | policy | policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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