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6.441 Transmission of Information (MIT) 6.441 Transmission of Information (MIT)

Description

6.441 offers an introduction to the quantitative theory of information and its applications to reliable, efficient communication systems. Topics include: mathematical definition and properties of information; source coding theorem, lossless compression of data, optimal lossless coding; noisy communication channels, channel coding theorem, the source-channel separation theorem, multiple access channels, broadcast channels, Gaussian noise, and time-varying channels. 6.441 offers an introduction to the quantitative theory of information and its applications to reliable, efficient communication systems. Topics include: mathematical definition and properties of information; source coding theorem, lossless compression of data, optimal lossless coding; noisy communication channels, channel coding theorem, the source-channel separation theorem, multiple access channels, broadcast channels, Gaussian noise, and time-varying channels.

Subjects

transmission of information | transmission of information | quantitative theory of information | quantitative theory of information | efficient communication systems | efficient communication systems | mathematical definition of information | mathematical definition of information | properties of information | properties of information | source coding theorem | source coding theorem | lossless compression of data | lossless compression of data | optimal lossless coding | optimal lossless coding | noisy communication channels | noisy communication channels | channel coding theorem | channel coding theorem | the source-channel separation theorem | the source-channel separation theorem | multiple access channels | multiple access channels | broadcast channels | broadcast channels | gaussian noise | gaussian noise | time-varying channels | time-varying channels | lossless data compression | lossless data compression | telecommunications | telecommunications | data transmission | data transmission

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.571 Generating Business Value from Information Technology (MIT) 15.571 Generating Business Value from Information Technology (MIT)

Description

This course covers what every senior manager needs to know about using IT to enable strategy and get more value from IT. In this course we take the strategic perspective of the general manager and study how leading firms get more value from their IT investments. The course focuses on the strategic impact and business value that can be achieved rather than the details of the technology. Issues around governance will pervade the course. An IT background is not required and this is not a 'technical' course. This course covers what every senior manager needs to know about using IT to enable strategy and get more value from IT. In this course we take the strategic perspective of the general manager and study how leading firms get more value from their IT investments. The course focuses on the strategic impact and business value that can be achieved rather than the details of the technology. Issues around governance will pervade the course. An IT background is not required and this is not a 'technical' course.

Subjects

IT governance | IT governance | information technology portfolio | information technology portfolio | information technology investment | information technology investment | information technology planning | information technology planning | IT architecture | IT architecture | outsourcing | outsourcing | CIO | CIO | business strategy | business strategy | IT infrastructure | IT infrastructure | enterprise architecture | enterprise architecture | ebusiness models | ebusiness models | information technology | information technology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.568B Management Information Systems: Generating Business Value from Information Technology (MIT) 15.568B Management Information Systems: Generating Business Value from Information Technology (MIT)

Description

Information Technology is pervasive in today's firms. For many firms IT is the single largest capital investment, often exceeding 50% of capital expenditure. As a result, in this course we take the strategic perspective of the general manager and study how these leading firms get more value from their IT investments. The course focuses on the business value that can be achieved rather than the details of the technology. Issues around IT governance will pervade the course.An IT background is not required and this is not a "technical" course. This is, however, an integrative course, including issues of business strategy, finance, and the study of organizations and people, which are also covered in other parts of the Sloan MBA program. The creation of business val Information Technology is pervasive in today's firms. For many firms IT is the single largest capital investment, often exceeding 50% of capital expenditure. As a result, in this course we take the strategic perspective of the general manager and study how these leading firms get more value from their IT investments. The course focuses on the business value that can be achieved rather than the details of the technology. Issues around IT governance will pervade the course.An IT background is not required and this is not a "technical" course. This is, however, an integrative course, including issues of business strategy, finance, and the study of organizations and people, which are also covered in other parts of the Sloan MBA program. The creation of business val

Subjects

IT | IT | information technology | information technology | ERP | ERP | resource planning | resource planning | e-business | e-business | capital investments | capital investments | business value | business value | business models | business models | chief information officer | chief information officer | CIO | CIO | IT governance | IT governance | networks | networks | IT enabled business models | IT enabled business models | direct to customer | direct to customer | content provider | content provider | value net integrator | value net integrator | internet | internet | information systems | information systems | information resources | information resources | networked organizations | networked organizations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT) 6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT)

Description

6.050J / 2.110J presents the unified theory of information with applications to computing, communications, thermodynamics, and other sciences. It covers digital signals and streams, codes, compression, noise, and probability, reversible and irreversible operations, information in biological systems, channel capacity, maximum-entropy formalism, thermodynamic equilibrium, temperature, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, and quantum computation. Designed for MIT freshmen as an elective, this course has been jointly developed by MIT's Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering. There is no known course similar to 6.050J / 2.110J offered at any other university.  6.050J / 2.110J presents the unified theory of information with applications to computing, communications, thermodynamics, and other sciences. It covers digital signals and streams, codes, compression, noise, and probability, reversible and irreversible operations, information in biological systems, channel capacity, maximum-entropy formalism, thermodynamic equilibrium, temperature, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, and quantum computation. Designed for MIT freshmen as an elective, this course has been jointly developed by MIT's Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering. There is no known course similar to 6.050J / 2.110J offered at any other university. 

Subjects

information and entropy | information and entropy | computing | computing | communications | communications | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | digital signals and streams | digital signals and streams | codes | codes | compression | compression | noise | noise | probability | probability | reversible operations | reversible operations | irreversible operations | irreversible operations | information in biological systems | information in biological systems | channel capacity | channel capacity | aximum-entropy formalism | aximum-entropy formalism | thermodynamic equilibrium | thermodynamic equilibrium | temperature | temperature | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | maximum-entropy formalism | maximum-entropy formalism | second law of thermodynamics | second law of thermodynamics | quantum computation | quantum computation | biological systems | biological systems | unified theory of information | unified theory of information | digital signals | digital signals | digital streams | digital streams | bits | bits | errors | errors | processes | processes | inference | inference | maximum entropy | maximum entropy | physical systems | physical systems | energy | energy | quantum information | quantum information | 6.050 | 6.050 | 2.110 | 2.110

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.160 Identification, Estimation, and Learning (MIT) 2.160 Identification, Estimation, and Learning (MIT)

Description

This course provides a broad theoretical basis for system identification, estimation, and learning. Students will study least squares estimation and its convergence properties, Kalman filters, noise dynamics and system representation, function approximation theory, neural nets, radial basis functions, wavelets, Volterra expansions, informative data sets, persistent excitation, asymptotic variance, central limit theorems, model structure selection, system order estimate, maximum likelihood, unbiased estimates, Cramer-Rao lower bound, Kullback-Leibler information distance, Akaike's information criterion, experiment design, and model validation. This course provides a broad theoretical basis for system identification, estimation, and learning. Students will study least squares estimation and its convergence properties, Kalman filters, noise dynamics and system representation, function approximation theory, neural nets, radial basis functions, wavelets, Volterra expansions, informative data sets, persistent excitation, asymptotic variance, central limit theorems, model structure selection, system order estimate, maximum likelihood, unbiased estimates, Cramer-Rao lower bound, Kullback-Leibler information distance, Akaike's information criterion, experiment design, and model validation.

Subjects

system identification; estimation; least squares estimation; Kalman filter; noise dynamics; system representation; function approximation theory; neural nets; radial basis functions; wavelets; volterra expansions; informative data sets; persistent excitation; asymptotic variance; central limit theorem; model structure selection; system order estimate; maximum likelihood; unbiased estimates; Cramer-Rao lower bound; Kullback-Leibler information distance; Akaike?s information criterion; experiment design; model validation. | system identification; estimation; least squares estimation; Kalman filter; noise dynamics; system representation; function approximation theory; neural nets; radial basis functions; wavelets; volterra expansions; informative data sets; persistent excitation; asymptotic variance; central limit theorem; model structure selection; system order estimate; maximum likelihood; unbiased estimates; Cramer-Rao lower bound; Kullback-Leibler information distance; Akaike?s information criterion; experiment design; model validation. | system identification | system identification | estimation | estimation | least squares estimation | least squares estimation | Kalman filter | Kalman filter | noise dynamics | noise dynamics | system representation | system representation | function approximation theory | function approximation theory | neural nets | neural nets | radial basis functions | radial basis functions | wavelets | wavelets | volterra expansions | volterra expansions | informative data sets | informative data sets | persistent excitation | persistent excitation | asymptotic variance | asymptotic variance | central limit theorem | central limit theorem | model structure selection | model structure selection | system order estimate | system order estimate | maximum likelihood | maximum likelihood | unbiased estimates | unbiased estimates | Cramer-Rao lower bound | Cramer-Rao lower bound | Kullback-Leibler information distance | Kullback-Leibler information distance | Akaike?s information criterion | Akaike?s information criterion | experiment design | experiment design | model validation | model validation

License

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15.571 Generating Business Value from Information Technology (MIT) 15.571 Generating Business Value from Information Technology (MIT)

Description

This course provides concepts and frameworks for understanding the potential impact of information technology (IT) on business strategy and performance. We will examine how some firms make IT a strategic asset while other firms struggle to realize value from IT investments. The course focuses on the implications of increased digitization for defining business strategies and operating models, and explores the roles of both general managers and IT executives in using IT to achieve operational excellence and business agility. Topics include business operating models, IT investment and prioritization, business strategy and IT alignment, the design and governance of digitized processes, and the role of the IT unit. Draws heavily on research and case studies from MIT Sloan Center for Information This course provides concepts and frameworks for understanding the potential impact of information technology (IT) on business strategy and performance. We will examine how some firms make IT a strategic asset while other firms struggle to realize value from IT investments. The course focuses on the implications of increased digitization for defining business strategies and operating models, and explores the roles of both general managers and IT executives in using IT to achieve operational excellence and business agility. Topics include business operating models, IT investment and prioritization, business strategy and IT alignment, the design and governance of digitized processes, and the role of the IT unit. Draws heavily on research and case studies from MIT Sloan Center for Information

Subjects

IT governance | IT governance | information technology portfolio | information technology portfolio | information technology investment | information technology investment | information technology planning | information technology planning | IT architecture | IT architecture | outsourcing | outsourcing | CIO | CIO | business strategy | business strategy | IT infrastructure | IT infrastructure | enterprise architecture | enterprise architecture | ebusiness models | ebusiness models | information technology | information technology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.15J Networks (MIT) 14.15J Networks (MIT)

Description

Networks are ubiquitous in our modern society. The World Wide Web that links us to and enables information flows with the rest of the world is the most visible example. It is, however, only one of many networks within which we are situated. Our social life is organized around networks of friends and colleagues. These networks determine our information, influence our opinions, and shape our political attitudes. They also link us, often through important but weak ties, to everybody else in the United States and in the world. Economic and financial markets also look much more like networks than anonymous marketplaces. Firms interact with the same suppliers and customers and use Web-like supply chains. Financial linkages, both among banks and between consumers, companies and banks, also form a Networks are ubiquitous in our modern society. The World Wide Web that links us to and enables information flows with the rest of the world is the most visible example. It is, however, only one of many networks within which we are situated. Our social life is organized around networks of friends and colleagues. These networks determine our information, influence our opinions, and shape our political attitudes. They also link us, often through important but weak ties, to everybody else in the United States and in the world. Economic and financial markets also look much more like networks than anonymous marketplaces. Firms interact with the same suppliers and customers and use Web-like supply chains. Financial linkages, both among banks and between consumers, companies and banks, also form a

Subjects

networks | networks | crowds | crowds | markets | markets | highly connected world | highly connected world | social networks | social networks | economic networks | economic networks | power networks | power networks | communication networks | communication networks | game theory | game theory | graph theory | graph theory | branching processes | branching processes | random graph models | random graph models | rich get richer phenomena | rich get richer phenomena | power laws | power laws | small worlds | small worlds | Erd?s-Renyi graphs | Erd?s-Renyi graphs | degree distributions | degree distributions | phase transitions | phase transitions | connectedness | connectedness | and giant component | and giant component | link analysis | link analysis | web search | web search | navigation | navigation | decentralized search | decentralized search | preferential attachment | preferential attachment | epidemics | epidemics | diffusion through networks | diffusion through networks | SIR | SIR | (susceptible | (susceptible | infected | infected | removed) | removed) | SIS | SIS | susceptible) | susceptible) | strategies | strategies | payoffs | payoffs | normal forms | normal forms | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | traffic networks | traffic networks | negative externalities | negative externalities | Braess' paradox | Braess' paradox | potential games | potential games | myopic behavior | myopic behavior | fictitious play | fictitious play | repeated games | repeated games | prisoner's dilemma | prisoner's dilemma | cooperation | cooperation | perfect information | perfect information | imperfect information | imperfect information | positive externalities | positive externalities | strategic complements | strategic complements | path dependence | path dependence | diffusion of innovation | diffusion of innovation | contagion pheonomena | contagion pheonomena | Bayes's rule | Bayes's rule | Bayesian Nash equilibrium | Bayesian Nash equilibrium | first price auctions | first price auctions | second price auctions | second price auctions | social learning | social learning | Bayesian learning | Bayesian learning | copying | copying | herding | herding | herd behavior | herd behavior | informational cascades | informational cascades | decisions | decisions | social choice | social choice | Condorcet jury theorem | Condorcet jury theorem | political economy | political economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.568A Practical Information Technology Management (MIT) 15.568A Practical Information Technology Management (MIT)

Description

The course purpose is to provide the substance and skill necessary to make sound business decisions relating to information systems and to work with senior line managers in the resolution of issues and problems in this area. Categories of issues which will be addressed in the course include: How do IT and its various manifestations in business, such as the Internet, affect current and future COMPETITIVENESS? How do we align business strategy and plans with IT strategy and IT plans? How can we ENGAGE executives in learning and leading IT-related change? How do we IMPLEMENT new systems, CHANGE work behavior, MANAGE projects? How should we ORGANIZE and GOVERN IT in an organization? The course purpose is to provide the substance and skill necessary to make sound business decisions relating to information systems and to work with senior line managers in the resolution of issues and problems in this area. Categories of issues which will be addressed in the course include: How do IT and its various manifestations in business, such as the Internet, affect current and future COMPETITIVENESS? How do we align business strategy and plans with IT strategy and IT plans? How can we ENGAGE executives in learning and leading IT-related change? How do we IMPLEMENT new systems, CHANGE work behavior, MANAGE projects? How should we ORGANIZE and GOVERN IT in an organization?

Subjects

IT | IT | information technology | information technology | ERP | ERP | resource planning | resource planning | e-business | e-business | capital investments | capital investments | business value | business value | business models | business models | chief information officer | chief information officer | CIO | CIO | IT governance | IT governance | networks | networks | IT enabled business models | IT enabled business models | direct to customer | direct to customer | content provider | content provider | value net integrator | value net integrator | information systems | information systems | technology | technology | competitiveness | competitiveness | business strategy | business strategy | change | change | project managment | project managment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT) 15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed. Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | computers | future developments | future developments | networks | networks | distributed computing | distributed computing | programming languages | programming languages | firewall | firewall | e-business | e-business | computer architecture | computer architecture | operating | operating | software development | software development | database | database | user interface | user interface | telecommunication | telecommunication | data transmission | data transmission | local area network | local area network | wireless network | wireless network | internet | internet | world wide web | world wide web | digital security | digital security | architecture | architecture | data | data | transmission | transmission | wireless | wireless | interface | interface | user | user | software | software | development | development | programming | programming | languages | languages | distributed | distributed | computing | computing | LAN | LAN | local | local | area | area | future | future | digital | digital | security | security | technology | technology | information | information | management | management | systems | systems | relational | relational | graphical | graphical | interfaces | interfaces | client/server | client/server | enterprise | enterprise | applications | applications | cryptography | cryptography | services | services | Microsoft | Microsoft | Access | Access | Lotus Notes | Lotus Notes | processing | processing | memory | memory | I/O | I/O | CPU | CPU | OS | OS | hardware | hardware | compression | compression | SQL | SQL | queries | queries | design | design | WAN | WAN | wide | wide | Ethernet | Ethernet | packet-switched | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | peer-to-peer | WWW | WWW | public | public | key | key | mining | mining | warehousing | warehousing | concepts | concepts | conceptual | conceptual | modern computing | modern computing | information management | information management | operating systems | operating systems | relational database systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | client/server systems | enterprise applications | enterprise applications | web.internet services | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | Microsoft Access | database management systems | database management systems | information technology | information technology | telecommunications | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | eBusiness applications | client | client | servers | servers | wireless area network | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Research Information Management: Organising Humanities Material

Description

Research Information Management: Organising Humanities Material is a course for humanities researchers (including graduate students), designed to occupy about half a day. Included are a course book, a set of sample files for use during course exercises, and a slideshow for classroom use (the course book and exercise files can also be used for individual study). Topics covered include: identifying your working style; organising paper and electronic material; file and folder structures; tagging vs. hierarchical filing; retrieving information; and linking notes and sources. These course materials are part of a set of resources created as part of the Sudamih Project at Oxford University Computing Services.

Subjects

research | researchers | research data | research data management | research information | research information management | data management | personal information managment | organising research information | organising research material | organisation | folder structures | file structures | hierarchical filing | tag-based filing | information retrieval | linking information | software tools | study skills | research skills | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Info skills

Description

Info skills is an online resource which guides undergraduates through researching their first assignment, with emphasis on identifying, finding and evaluating, and referening information, through a variety of media.

Subjects

information literacy | online information literacy | info skills | information skills | finding information | evaluating information | referencing information | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Research Information Management: Tools for the Humanities

Description

Research Information Management: Tools for the Humanities is a course for humanities researchers, designed to occupy about half a day. Included are a course book, a set of sample files for use during course exercises, and a slideshow for classroom use (the course book and exercise files can also be used for individual study). Topics covered include: selecting appropriate software tools; organising electronic material; retrieving information; integrating varied material; and when to consider using a database. The course introduces a range of software tools, many of which are available free of charge. These course materials are part of a set of resources created as part of the Sudamih Project at Oxford University Computing Services.

Subjects

research | researchers | research data | research data management | research information | research information management | data management | personal information managment | organising research information | organising research material | organisation | information retrieval | software tools | bibliographic software | annotation software | study skills | research skills | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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How to Research your Assignment

Description

This interactive tutorial is aimed at first year students or those wanting to improve their information retrieval and research skills. It shows you how to research your assignment by creating a research strategy and identifying and using sources of information. The tutorial contains quizzes and interactions and the user is given the opportunity to work through the content in a self paced manner.

Subjects

research | information retrieval | sources of information | information use | information evaluation | information literacy

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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Computational Perspectives on the Structure and Information Flows in Online Networks

Description

In this talk, Jure discusses how the computational perspective can be applied to questions involving the structure of online networks and the dynamics of information that flow through such networks. With an increasing amount of social interaction taking place online, we are accumulating large amounts of data about phenomena that were once essentially invisible to us: the collective behaviour and social interactions of hundreds of millions of people. Analyzing this data computationally offers enormous potential to address both long-standing scientific questions, and to harness and inform the design of future social computing applications.

Subjects

Internet | social interaction | data | Web 2.0 | collective action | social behaviour | machine | computation | analysis | information | networks | social networks | structure | information flow | big data | ukoer | Internet | social interaction | data | Web 2.0 | collective action | social behaviour | machine | computation | analysis | data | information | networks | social networks | structure | information flow | big data

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Computational Perspectives on the Structure and Information Flows in Online Networks

Description

In this talk, Jure Leskovec discusses how the computational perspective can be applied to questions involving the structure of online networks and the dynamics of information that flow through such networks. With an increasing amount of social interaction taking place online, we are accumulating large amounts of data about phenomena that were once essentially invisible to us: the collective behaviour and social interactions of hundreds of millions of people. Analyzing this data computationally offers enormous potential to address both long-standing scientific questions, and to harness and inform the design of future social computing applications.

Subjects

Internet | social interaction | data | Web 2.0 | collective action | social behaviour | machine | computation | analysis | information | networks | social networks | structure | information flow | big data | ukoer | Internet | social interaction | data | Web 2.0 | collective action | social behaviour | machine | computation | analysis | data | information | networks | social networks | structure | information flow | big data

License

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15.762J Supply Chain Planning (SMA 6305) (MIT) 15.762J Supply Chain Planning (SMA 6305) (MIT)

Description

15.762J focuses on effective supply chain strategies for companies that operate globally with emphasis on how to plan and integrate supply chain components into a coordinated system. Students are exposed to concepts and models important in supply chain planning with emphasis on key tradeoffs and phenomena. The course introduces and utilizes key tactics such as risk pooling and inventory placement, integrated planning and collaboration, and information sharing. Lectures, computer exercises, and case discussions introduce various models and methods for supply chain analysis and optimization. The class is recommended for Operations Management concentrators and is a first half-term subject. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 15.762J focuses on effective supply chain strategies for companies that operate globally with emphasis on how to plan and integrate supply chain components into a coordinated system. Students are exposed to concepts and models important in supply chain planning with emphasis on key tradeoffs and phenomena. The course introduces and utilizes key tactics such as risk pooling and inventory placement, integrated planning and collaboration, and information sharing. Lectures, computer exercises, and case discussions introduce various models and methods for supply chain analysis and optimization. The class is recommended for Operations Management concentrators and is a first half-term subject. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA

Subjects

supply chain strategies | supply chain strategies | companies | companies | supply chain components | supply chain components | concepts and models | concepts and models | key tradeoffs and phenomena | key tradeoffs and phenomena | risk pooling and inventory placement | risk pooling and inventory placement | integrated planning and collaboration | integrated planning and collaboration | and information sharing | and information sharing | supply chain analysis and optimization | supply chain analysis and optimization | information sharing | information sharing | 15.762 | 15.762 | 1.273 | 1.273 | ESD.267 | ESD.267 | SMA 6305 | SMA 6305

License

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1.963 Globalization of the Engineering and Construction Industry (MIT) 1.963 Globalization of the Engineering and Construction Industry (MIT)

Description

This course explores the challenges and risks faced by senior managers of construction, engineering and architecture companies in entering global markets in general, and sponsoring concessions in particular. The course includes a discussion of innovative approaches to nation building, partnering, finance, utilization of specialized delivery systems, privatization, outsourcing and concessions; opportunities created by advanced information technology; and appropriate strategies for entering attractive and rapidly expanding international fields and markets. This course explores the challenges and risks faced by senior managers of construction, engineering and architecture companies in entering global markets in general, and sponsoring concessions in particular. The course includes a discussion of innovative approaches to nation building, partnering, finance, utilization of specialized delivery systems, privatization, outsourcing and concessions; opportunities created by advanced information technology; and appropriate strategies for entering attractive and rapidly expanding international fields and markets.

Subjects

management | construction | engineering | architecture | global markets | concessions | partnering | finance | privatization | outsourcing | information technology | international | globalization | greatest construction projects | Mexican road privatization | management | construction | engineering | architecture | global markets | concessions | partnering | finance | privatization | outsourcing | information technology | international | globalization | greatest construction projects | Mexican road privatization | management | management | construction | construction | engineering | engineering | architecture | architecture | global markets | global markets | concessions | concessions | partnering | partnering | finance | finance | privatization | privatization | outsourcing | outsourcing | information technology | information technology | international | international | globalization | globalization | greatest construction projects | greatest construction projects | Mexican road privatization | Mexican road privatization

License

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17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT) 17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective. This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | economics | economics | political economy | political economy | democratic | democratic | countries | countries | collective | collective | choice | choice | electoral competiton | electoral competiton | public goods | public goods | size | size | government | government | taxation | taxation | income redistribution | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | macroeconomic policy | voting models | voting models | equilibrium models | equilibrium models | information | information | learning | learning | agency models | agency models | political parties | political parties | vote-buying | vote-buying | vote-trading | vote-trading | resource allocation | resource allocation | Colonel Blotto | Colonel Blotto | interest groups | interest groups | lobbying | lobbying | legislatures | legislatures | bargaining | bargaining | coalitions | coalitions | stability | stability | informational | informational | distributive | distributive | theories | theories | executive | executive | relations | relations | representative democracy | representative democracy

License

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11.128 Information Technology and the Labor Market (MIT) 11.128 Information Technology and the Labor Market (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will explore how information technology is reshaping the U.S. labor market: the mix of occupations, the skills required to perform an occupation, the way work is organized, labor productivity, wage levels and wage inequality.We begin from the perspective the brain is a wonderful information-processing instrument, but in those cases where a computer and the brain can process information in roughly the same way the computer can often do it at lower cost. This fact leads to a pair of crosscutting market forces:Information technology is opening up many new opportunities through its complementarity with some human skills.In both existing and new jobs, information technology is replacing human labor in certain tasks by substituting for other human skills.We will explore the cu In this course, we will explore how information technology is reshaping the U.S. labor market: the mix of occupations, the skills required to perform an occupation, the way work is organized, labor productivity, wage levels and wage inequality.We begin from the perspective the brain is a wonderful information-processing instrument, but in those cases where a computer and the brain can process information in roughly the same way the computer can often do it at lower cost. This fact leads to a pair of crosscutting market forces:Information technology is opening up many new opportunities through its complementarity with some human skills.In both existing and new jobs, information technology is replacing human labor in certain tasks by substituting for other human skills.We will explore the cu

Subjects

information technology | information technology | labor | labor | labor market | labor market | market forces | market forces | computers | computers | information processing | information processing | technological limits | technological limits | technology | technology | interfaces | interfaces | human interaction | human interaction | cognition | cognition | brain | brain | productivity | productivity

License

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17.881 Game Theory and Political Theory (MIT) 17.881 Game Theory and Political Theory (MIT)

Description

Increasingly, political scientists are using game theory to analyze strategic interactions across many different settings. Each of the sub-fields, to differing degrees, has seen game theoretic concepts enter its vocabulary, and students entering the profession will need to understand the potential and limits of game theory. This course aims to give students an entry-level understanding of the basic concepts of game theory, and how these concepts have been applied to the study of political phenomena. Because an important component of game theory in political science and political economy is the analysis of substantive political phenomena, we will cover illustrative examples each week in combination with methodological developments. The political and economic phenomena that we will examine Increasingly, political scientists are using game theory to analyze strategic interactions across many different settings. Each of the sub-fields, to differing degrees, has seen game theoretic concepts enter its vocabulary, and students entering the profession will need to understand the potential and limits of game theory. This course aims to give students an entry-level understanding of the basic concepts of game theory, and how these concepts have been applied to the study of political phenomena. Because an important component of game theory in political science and political economy is the analysis of substantive political phenomena, we will cover illustrative examples each week in combination with methodological developments. The political and economic phenomena that we will examine

Subjects

game theory | game theory | game theoretic concepts | game theoretic concepts | games of complete information | games of complete information | games of incomplete information | games of incomplete information | political phenomena | political phenomena | legislative rules | legislative rules | nuclear deterrence | nuclear deterrence | electoral competition | electoral competition | imperfect markets | imperfect markets | probability | probability | calculus | calculus

License

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6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT) 6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course explores the ultimate limits to communication and computation, with an emphasis on the physical nature of information and information processing. Topics include: information and computation, digital signals, codes and compression, applications such as biological representations of information, logic circuits, computer architectures, and algorithmic information, noise, probability, error correction, reversible and irreversible operations, physics of computation, and quantum computation. The concept of entropy applied to channel capacity and to the second law of thermodynamics. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course explores the ultimate limits to communication and computation, with an emphasis on the physical nature of information and information processing. Topics include: information and computation, digital signals, codes and compression, applications such as biological representations of information, logic circuits, computer architectures, and algorithmic information, noise, probability, error correction, reversible and irreversible operations, physics of computation, and quantum computation. The concept of entropy applied to channel capacity and to the second law of thermodynamics.

Subjects

information and entropy | information and entropy | computing | computing | communications | communications | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | digital signals and streams | digital signals and streams | codes | codes | compression | compression | noise | noise | probability | probability | reversible operations | reversible operations | irreversible operations | irreversible operations | information in biological systems | information in biological systems | channel capacity | channel capacity | maximum-entropy formalism | maximum-entropy formalism | thermodynamic equilibrium | thermodynamic equilibrium | temperature | temperature | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation

License

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15.566 Information Technology as an Integrating Force in Manufacturing (MIT) 15.566 Information Technology as an Integrating Force in Manufacturing (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. In virtually every industry and every firm, information technology is driving change, creating opportunities and challenges. Leaders who don't understand at least the fundamentals of information systems will be at a strategic disadvantage. This course provides broad coverage of technology concepts and trends underlying current and future developments in information technology, and fundamental principles for the effective use of computer-based information systems. There will be a special emphasis on manufacturing. Information Systems topics that will be covered include networks and distributed computing, including the World Wide Web, hardware and operating systems, software development tools and processes, relational databases, security a Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. In virtually every industry and every firm, information technology is driving change, creating opportunities and challenges. Leaders who don't understand at least the fundamentals of information systems will be at a strategic disadvantage. This course provides broad coverage of technology concepts and trends underlying current and future developments in information technology, and fundamental principles for the effective use of computer-based information systems. There will be a special emphasis on manufacturing. Information Systems topics that will be covered include networks and distributed computing, including the World Wide Web, hardware and operating systems, software development tools and processes, relational databases, security a

Subjects

information technology | information technology | business | business | manufacturing | manufacturing | strategy | strategy | information systems | information systems | networks | networks | distributed computing | distributed computing | software development | software development | web | web | enterprise application | enterprise application | security | security | database | database | operating system | operating system | electronic commerce | electronic commerce | business to business | business to business

License

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1.223J Transportation Policy, Strategy, and Management (MIT) 1.223J Transportation Policy, Strategy, and Management (MIT)

Description

This class surveys the current concepts, theories, and issues in strategic management of transportation organizations. It provides transportation logistics and engineering systems students with an overview of the operating context, leadership challenges, strategies, and management tools that are used in today's public and private transportation organizations. The following concepts, tools, and issues are presented in both public and private sector cases: alternative models of decision-making, strategic planning (e.g., use of SWOT analysis and scenario development), stakeholder valuation and analysis, government-based regulation and cooperation within the transportation enterprise, disaster communications, systems safety, change management, and the impact of globalization. This class surveys the current concepts, theories, and issues in strategic management of transportation organizations. It provides transportation logistics and engineering systems students with an overview of the operating context, leadership challenges, strategies, and management tools that are used in today's public and private transportation organizations. The following concepts, tools, and issues are presented in both public and private sector cases: alternative models of decision-making, strategic planning (e.g., use of SWOT analysis and scenario development), stakeholder valuation and analysis, government-based regulation and cooperation within the transportation enterprise, disaster communications, systems safety, change management, and the impact of globalization.

Subjects

public transportation systems; pollution; infrastructure; government regulation; public policy; strategic planning management; labor relations; maintenance planning; administration; financing; marketing policy; fare policy; management information; decision support systems; transit industry; service provision; private sector; alternative models of decision-making; strategic planning; stakeholder valuation and analysis; government-based regulation and cooperation; transportation enterprise; disaster communications; systems safety; change management; and the impact of globalization; | public transportation systems; pollution; infrastructure; government regulation; public policy; strategic planning management; labor relations; maintenance planning; administration; financing; marketing policy; fare policy; management information; decision support systems; transit industry; service provision; private sector; alternative models of decision-making; strategic planning; stakeholder valuation and analysis; government-based regulation and cooperation; transportation enterprise; disaster communications; systems safety; change management; and the impact of globalization; | public transportation systems | public transportation systems | pollution | pollution | infrastructure | infrastructure | government regulation | government regulation | public policy | public policy | strategic planning management | strategic planning management | labor relations | labor relations | maintenance planning | maintenance planning | administration | administration | financing | financing | marketing policy | marketing policy | fare policy | fare policy | management information | management information | decision support systems | decision support systems | transit industry | transit industry | service provision | service provision | private sector | private sector | alternative models of decision-making | alternative models of decision-making | strategic planning | strategic planning | stakeholder valuation and analysis | stakeholder valuation and analysis | government-based regulation and cooperation | government-based regulation and cooperation | transportation enterprise | transportation enterprise | disaster communications | disaster communications | systems safety | systems safety | change management | change management | and the impact of globalization | and the impact of globalization | the impact of globalization | the impact of globalization | 1.223 | 1.223 | ESD.203 | ESD.203

License

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1.464 E-Commerce and the Internet in Real Estate and Construction (MIT) 1.464 E-Commerce and the Internet in Real Estate and Construction (MIT)

Description

1.464 examines the long term effects of information technology on business strategy in the real estate and construction industry. Considerations include: supply chain, allocation of risk, impact on contract obligations and security, trends toward consolidation, and the convergence of information transparency and personal effectiveness. Resources are drawn from the world of dot.com entrepreneurship and "old economy" responses. 1.464 examines the long term effects of information technology on business strategy in the real estate and construction industry. Considerations include: supply chain, allocation of risk, impact on contract obligations and security, trends toward consolidation, and the convergence of information transparency and personal effectiveness. Resources are drawn from the world of dot.com entrepreneurship and "old economy" responses.

Subjects

e-commerce | e-commerce | Internet | Internet | real estate | real estate | construction | construction | information technology | information technology | business strategy | business strategy | supply chain | supply chain | risk allocation | risk allocation | contract obligations | contract obligations | consolidation | consolidation | information transparency | information transparency | case method | case method | case study | case study | industry value system | industry value system | optimization | optimization | business models | business models | incentives | incentives | game theory | game theory | strategic managment | strategic managment | knowledge management | knowledge management

License

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1.124J Foundations of Software Engineering (MIT) 1.124J Foundations of Software Engineering (MIT)

Description

This is a foundation subject in modern software development techniques for engineering and information technology. The design and development of component-based software (using C# and .NET) is covered; data structures and algorithms for modeling, analysis, and visualization; basic problem-solving techniques; web services; and the management and maintenance of software. Includes a treatment of topics such as sorting and searching algorithms; and numerical simulation techniques. Foundation for in-depth exploration of image processing, computational geometry, finite element methods, network methods and e-business applications. This course is a core requirement for the Information Technology M. Eng. program. This class was also offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.470J. This is a foundation subject in modern software development techniques for engineering and information technology. The design and development of component-based software (using C# and .NET) is covered; data structures and algorithms for modeling, analysis, and visualization; basic problem-solving techniques; web services; and the management and maintenance of software. Includes a treatment of topics such as sorting and searching algorithms; and numerical simulation techniques. Foundation for in-depth exploration of image processing, computational geometry, finite element methods, network methods and e-business applications. This course is a core requirement for the Information Technology M. Eng. program. This class was also offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.470J.

Subjects

modern software development | modern software development | engineering and information technology | engineering and information technology | component-based software | component-based software | C# | C# | .NET | .NET | data structures | data structures | algorithms for modeling | algorithms for modeling | analysis | analysis | visualization | visualization | basic problem-solving techniques | basic problem-solving techniques | web services | web services | management and maintenance of software | management and maintenance of software | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | algorithms | algorithms | numerical simulation techniques | numerical simulation techniques | image processing | image processing | computational geometry | computational geometry | finite element methods | finite element methods | network methods | network methods | e-business applications | e-business applications | classes | classes | objects | objects | inheritance | inheritance | virtual functions | virtual functions | abstract classes | abstract classes | polymorphism | polymorphism | Java applications | Java applications | applets | applets | Abstract Windowing Toolkit | Abstract Windowing Toolkit | Graphics | Graphics | Threads | Threads | Java | Java | C++ | C++ | information technology | information technology | engineering | engineering | modeling algorithms | modeling algorithms | basic problem-solving | basic problem-solving | software management | software management | software maintenance | software maintenance | searching algorithms | searching algorithms | numerical simulation | numerical simulation | object oriented programming | object oriented programming | 13.470J | 13.470J | 1.124 | 1.124 | 2.159 | 2.159 | 13.470 | 13.470

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