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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations. This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | developing--country governments | international | international | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | new--town development | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | developing countries | national planning | national planning | planners | planners | government institutions | government institutions | national government | national government | local government | local government | low-cost housing | low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | reform | reform | politics | politics | patronage | patronage | clientelism | clientelism | corruption | corruption | civil servants | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private | public vs. private

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT)

Description

This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing, labor standards, post-conflict development, and the role of aid in development. The course will illuminate current development challenges through published research in the field. The literature is rich, and across many disciplines in the social sciences. Case studies and real world examples through interaction with planning practitioners are drawn from around the world. This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing, labor standards, post-conflict development, and the role of aid in development. The course will illuminate current development challenges through published research in the field. The literature is rich, and across many disciplines in the social sciences. Case studies and real world examples through interaction with planning practitioners are drawn from around the world.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | political science | economics | wealth | neoclassical | development | ecology | power | trade | capital | foreign investment | intellectual property | migration | foreignpolicy | globalization | internet | sustainability | institutions | foreign policy | IPE | dual national objectives | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | neoclassical economics | development economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | perspectives | structural views | power relations | politics | international trade | capital flows | intellectual property rights | international migration | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | comparative | time | countries | regions | firms | industrial states | developing states | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | complexity | localization | technology | knowledge economy | finance | global markets | political economy | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | social control | bureaucracies | good governance | market institutions | collective action | decision making | political savvy | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT) 14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT)

Description

This course explores the foundations of policy making in developing countries. The goal is to spell out various policy options and to quantify the trade-offs between them. We will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. This is an empirical class. For each topic, we will study several concrete examples chosen from around the world. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or non-governmental organizations (NGOs))? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful? This course explores the foundations of policy making in developing countries. The goal is to spell out various policy options and to quantify the trade-offs between them. We will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. This is an empirical class. For each topic, we will study several concrete examples chosen from around the world. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or non-governmental organizations (NGOs))? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful?

Subjects

Economics | Economics | development | development | policy | policy | human | human | education | education | health | health | gender | gender | family | family | land | land | relations | relations | risk | risk | informal | informal | formal | formal | norms | norms | institutions | institutions | decisions | decisions | poor | poor | households | households | countries | countries | government | government | international | international | organizations | organizations | Non-governmental organizations | Non-governmental organizations | NGOs | NGOs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT) 14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT)

Description

This class focuses on labor institutions, the transformation of those institutions in the last three decades, and the possible relationship between that transformation and the shifting distribution of wage and salary income. The emphasis is on the United States and other advanced industrial countries, with some discussion of the relevance of the theory and analysis to developing economies. This class focuses on labor institutions, the transformation of those institutions in the last three decades, and the possible relationship between that transformation and the shifting distribution of wage and salary income. The emphasis is on the United States and other advanced industrial countries, with some discussion of the relevance of the theory and analysis to developing economies.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | labor | labor | institutions | institutions | unions | unions | worker motivation | worker motivation | technology | technology | social capital | social capital | networks | networks | identity | identity | careers | careers | transformation | transformation | distribution | distribution | wage | wage | salary | salary | income | income | United States | United States | advanced industrial countries | advanced industrial countries | theory | theory | analysis | analysis | developing economies | developing economies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.731 Economic History (MIT) 14.731 Economic History (MIT)

Description

This course is a survey of world economic history, and it introduces economics students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. It is designed to expand the range of empirical settings in students' research by drawing upon historical material and long-run data. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. The emphasis will be on questions related to labor markets and economic growth. This course is a survey of world economic history, and it introduces economics students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. It is designed to expand the range of empirical settings in students' research by drawing upon historical material and long-run data. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. The emphasis will be on questions related to labor markets and economic growth.

Subjects

Economic History | Economic History | industrialization | industrialization | demographic change | demographic change | policies | policies | Applied Economics | Applied Economics | formulate and test hypotheses | formulate and test hypotheses | labor history | labor history | discrimination | discrimination | technology | technology | institutions | institutions | financial crises | financial crises | migration | migration | recovery after shocks | recovery after shocks | wages | wages | inequality | inequality | health | health | stock market regulation | stock market regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT) 14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT)

Description

This is the second of a two-part sequence of courses in labor economics. The course sequence is also open to qualified students in related fields and classes may be taken individually or out of sequence. This part of the sequence is principally concerned with issues relating to the determinants of the wage and salary distribution. The first half is organized around topics in wage determination, which are of particular interest for current research and policy and culminates with a focus on recent debates about the increasing dispersion of wage and salary income. The second half of the course is focused on labor market institutions and technological changes, and relates the debate about the income distribution to other major changes in the structure and texture of advanced industrial societi This is the second of a two-part sequence of courses in labor economics. The course sequence is also open to qualified students in related fields and classes may be taken individually or out of sequence. This part of the sequence is principally concerned with issues relating to the determinants of the wage and salary distribution. The first half is organized around topics in wage determination, which are of particular interest for current research and policy and culminates with a focus on recent debates about the increasing dispersion of wage and salary income. The second half of the course is focused on labor market institutions and technological changes, and relates the debate about the income distribution to other major changes in the structure and texture of advanced industrial societi

Subjects

labor | labor | economics | economics | trade unions | trade unions | wage differentials | wage differentials | international trade | international trade | wage and salary distribution | wage and salary distribution | wage determination | wage determination | increasing dispersion of wage and salary income | increasing dispersion of wage and salary income | labor market institutions | labor market institutions | technological changes | technological changes | income distribution | income distribution | United States and other advanced industrial countries | United States and other advanced industrial countries | moral hazard and agency | moral hazard and agency | Static single agent models | Static single agent models | Intrinsic motivation | Intrinsic motivation | Multiple tasks | Multiple tasks | Multiple agents | Multiple agents | Dynamic agency | Dynamic agency | Efficiency wages | Efficiency wages | Employer Wage Differentials | Employer Wage Differentials | Industry and firm size differentials | Industry and firm size differentials | Compensating differentials | Compensating differentials | Discrimination and Differentials by Race and Gender | Discrimination and Differentials by Race and Gender | Changes in the Wage Structure and Inequality | Changes in the Wage Structure and Inequality | Worker Motivation and Behavior | Worker Motivation and Behavior | Social Dimensions of the Labor Force | Social Dimensions of the Labor Force | Social class | Social class | Social capital | Social capital | Immigration | Immigration | Quasi-unions in the New Labor Market | Quasi-unions in the New Labor Market | Labor market regulations in a global economy | Labor market regulations in a global economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT) STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science. This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science.

Subjects

history | history | science | science | darwin | darwin | galileo | galileo | goethe | goethe | mesmer | mesmer | boyle | boyle | hobbes | hobbes | einstein | einstein | bethe | bethe | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | victorian | victorian | philosophy | philosophy | science in cultural context | science in cultural context | imperialism | imperialism | natural history | natural history | institutions | institutions | biomedical research | biomedical research | modern physics | modern physics | post-war physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | scientific advancement | evolution | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT) STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives. This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | Social | study | study | science | science | technology | technology | interdisciplinary field | interdisciplinary field | social practice | social practice | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | sociology | sociology | scientific institutions | scientific institutions | knowledge | knowledge | anthropology | anthropology | feminism | feminism | critical race theory | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | post-colonial studies | queer theory | queer theory | human culture | human culture | politics | politics | theories | theories | methods | methods | reproduction | reproduction | social reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT)

Description

This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing, labor standards, post-conflict development, and the role of aid in development. The course will illuminate current development challenges through published research in the field. The literature is rich, and across many disciplines in the social sciences. Case studies and real world examples through interaction with planning practitioners are drawn from around the world.

Subjects

developing-country governments | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | social control | bureaucracies | good governance | market institutions | collective action | decision making | political savvy | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT) STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science. This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science.

Subjects

history | history | science | science | darwin | darwin | galileo | galileo | goethe | goethe | mesmer | mesmer | boyle | boyle | hobbes | hobbes | einstein | einstein | bethe | bethe | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | victorian | victorian | philosophy | philosophy | science in cultural context | science in cultural context | imperialism | imperialism | natural history | natural history | institutions | institutions | biomedical research | biomedical research | modern physics | modern physics | post-war physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | scientific advancement | evolution | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT) STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives. This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | Social | study | study | science | science | technology | technology | interdisciplinary field | interdisciplinary field | social practice | social practice | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | sociology | sociology | scientific institutions | scientific institutions | knowledge | knowledge | anthropology | anthropology | feminism | feminism | critical race theory | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | post-colonial studies | queer theory | queer theory | human culture | human culture | politics | politics | theories | theories | methods | methods | reproduction | reproduction | social reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | international | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | national planning | planners | government institutions | national government | local government | low-cost housing | new-town development | reform | politics | patronage | clientelism | corruption | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | international | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | national planning | planners | government institutions | national government | local government | low-cost housing | new-town development | reform | politics | patronage | clientelism | corruption | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.810 Topics in Philosophy of Science: Social Science (MIT) 24.810 Topics in Philosophy of Science: Social Science (MIT)

Description

This course offers an advanced survey of current debates about the ontology, methodology, and aims of the social sciences. This course offers an advanced survey of current debates about the ontology, methodology, and aims of the social sciences.

Subjects

Ontology | Ontology | methodology | methodology | social science | social science | human being | human being | human behavior | human behavior | social structure | social structure | practices | practices | norms | norms | institutions | institutions | individual | individual | society | society | mental state | mental state | values | values | theory | theory | objectivity | objectivity | reductionism | reductionism | individualism | individualism | holism | holism | prediction | prediction | laws | laws | explanation | explanation | rational choice | rational choice | functional | functional

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT) 9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT)

Description

Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

social animals | social animals | social | social | animals | animals | society | society | human society | human society | members | members | community | community | living together | living together | mutual benefit | mutual benefit | people | people | region | region | country | country | world | world | whole | whole | association | association | body | body | individuals | individuals | functional interdependence | functional interdependence | national or cultural identity | national or cultural identity | social solidarity | social solidarity | language or hierarchical organization | language or hierarchical organization | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | groups | groups | economic | economic | social or industrial infrastructure | social or industrial infrastructure | made up of a varied collection of individuals | made up of a varied collection of individuals | ethnic groups | ethnic groups | nation state | nation state | broader cultural group | broader cultural group | organized voluntary association of people for religious | organized voluntary association of people for religious | benevolent | benevolent | cultural | cultural | scientific | scientific | political | political | patriotic | patriotic | or other purposes. | or other purposes.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | social control | bureaucracies | good governance | market institutions | collective action | decision making | political savvy | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.954 Community-Owned Enterprise and Civic Participation (MIT) 11.954 Community-Owned Enterprise and Civic Participation (MIT)

Description

This course will examine literature and practice regarding community-owned enterprise as an alternative means of increasing community participation and development. The use of cooperatives, credit unions, land trusts, and limited stock ownership enterprises for increasing community participation and empowerment will be examined. This course will examine literature and practice regarding community-owned enterprise as an alternative means of increasing community participation and development. The use of cooperatives, credit unions, land trusts, and limited stock ownership enterprises for increasing community participation and empowerment will be examined.

Subjects

cooperatives | cooperatives | capitalism | capitalism | participatory democracy | participatory democracy | social capital | social capital | community governance | community governance | politics | politics | economy | economy | power dynamics | power dynamics | environmental sustainability | environmental sustainability | economic development | economic development | markets | markets | institutions | institutions | community development | community development | poverty | poverty | real estate | real estate | trusts | trusts | housing coops | housing coops | banking | banking | unions | unions | pensions | pensions | investments | investments | privatization | privatization | gainsharing | gainsharing | remittances | remittances

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT) 17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance. This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | sustainable development | sustainable development | industrialized nations | industrialized nations | aging population | aging population | consumption | consumption | developing countries | developing countries | economics | economics | production | production | sociology | sociology | technology | technology | regulation | regulation | public policy | public policy | environment | environment | business | business | aging | aging | population | population | countries | countries | developing | developing | development | development | industrial | industrial | industrialized | industrialized | nations | nations | politics | politics | political | political | theory | theory | sustainable | sustainable | public | public | policy | policy | sustainability | sustainability | economies | economies | transition | transition | growth | growth | institutions | institutions | institutional | institutional | trade | trade | international | international

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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