Searching for institutions : 131 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5

11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations. This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | developing--country governments | international | international | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | new--town development | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | developing countries | national planning | national planning | planners | planners | government institutions | government institutions | national government | national government | local government | local government | low-cost housing | low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | reform | reform | politics | politics | patronage | patronage | clientelism | clientelism | corruption | corruption | civil servants | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private | public vs. private

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT)

Description

This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing, labor standards, post-conflict development, and the role of aid in development. The course will illuminate current development challenges through published research in the field. The literature is rich, and across many disciplines in the social sciences. Case studies and real world examples through interaction with planning practitioners are drawn from around the world. This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing, labor standards, post-conflict development, and the role of aid in development. The course will illuminate current development challenges through published research in the field. The literature is rich, and across many disciplines in the social sciences. Case studies and real world examples through interaction with planning practitioners are drawn from around the world.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.215 Medical Anthropology: Culture, Society, and Ethics in Disease and Health (MIT) 21A.215 Medical Anthropology: Culture, Society, and Ethics in Disease and Health (MIT)

Description

This course looks at medicine from a cross-cultural perspective, focusing on the human, as opposed to biological, side of things. Students learn how to analyze various kinds of medical practice as cultural systems. Particular emphasis is placed on Western (bio-) medicine; students examine how biomedicine constructs disease, health, body, and mind, and how it articulates with other institutions, national and international. This course looks at medicine from a cross-cultural perspective, focusing on the human, as opposed to biological, side of things. Students learn how to analyze various kinds of medical practice as cultural systems. Particular emphasis is placed on Western (bio-) medicine; students examine how biomedicine constructs disease, health, body, and mind, and how it articulates with other institutions, national and international.

Subjects

ethics | ethics | biomedicine | biomedicine | cultural systems | cultural systems | medical practice | medical practice | health | health | disease | disease | mental illness | mental illness | leprosy | leprosy | placebo | placebo | pharmaceuticals | pharmaceuticals | racism | racism | sexism | sexism | medical institutions | medical institutions | chronic illness | chronic illness | reproductive technologies | reproductive technologies | isolation | isolation | international health | international health

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.424 International Political Economy of Advanced Industrial Societies (MIT) 17.424 International Political Economy of Advanced Industrial Societies (MIT)

Description

This graduate class is designed as a PhD-level overview of international political economy (IPE), with an emphasis on the advanced industrial countries. The syllabus is divided into three sections: international trade; international monetary and financial relations (including foreign direct investment); and security. This graduate class is designed as a PhD-level overview of international political economy (IPE), with an emphasis on the advanced industrial countries. The syllabus is divided into three sections: international trade; international monetary and financial relations (including foreign direct investment); and security.

Subjects

International Trade | International Trade | Industries | Industries | International Monetary | International Monetary | international Financial Relations | international Financial Relations | International Political Economy and Security | International Political Economy and Security | Voters | Voters | Cleavages | Cleavages | institutions | institutions | structure | structure | Exchange Rate Regimes | Exchange Rate Regimes | Currency Crises | Currency Crises | International Capital Mobility | International Capital Mobility | Domestic Policymaking | Domestic Policymaking | Capital Account Openness | Capital Account Openness | Foreign Direct Investment | Foreign Direct Investment | Conflict | Conflict | Economic Interdependence | Economic Interdependence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.013J American Urban History I (MIT) 11.013J American Urban History I (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar on the history of institutions and institutional change in American cities from roughly 1850 to the present. Among the institutions to be looked at are political machines, police departments, courts, schools, prisons, public authorities, and universities. The focus of the course is on readings and discussions. This course is a seminar on the history of institutions and institutional change in American cities from roughly 1850 to the present. Among the institutions to be looked at are political machines, police departments, courts, schools, prisons, public authorities, and universities. The focus of the course is on readings and discussions.

Subjects

urban planning | urban planning | urban design | urban design | cities | cities | downtown | downtown | skyscrapers | skyscrapers | buildings | buildings | institutions | institutions | police | police | prisons | prisons | courts | courts | city hall | city hall | political machines | political machines | reform | reform | crime | crime | public safety | public safety | public schools | public schools | education | education | welfare | welfare | railways | railways | public authorities | public authorities | housing | housing | slums | slums | hospitals | hospitals | universities | universities | 11.013 | 11.013 | 21H.231 | 21H.231

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

15.023J Global Climate Change: Economics, Science, and Policy (MIT) 15.023J Global Climate Change: Economics, Science, and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scientific, economic, and ecological issues underlying the threat of global climate change, and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response. The focus is on developing an integrated approach to analysis of climate change processes, and assessment of proposed policy measures, drawing on research and model development within the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change. This course introduces scientific, economic, and ecological issues underlying the threat of global climate change, and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response. The focus is on developing an integrated approach to analysis of climate change processes, and assessment of proposed policy measures, drawing on research and model development within the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change.

Subjects

15.023 | 15.023 | 12.848 | 12.848 | ESD.128 | ESD.128 | scientific | economic | and ecological issues underlying the threat of global climate change | scientific | economic | and ecological issues underlying the threat of global climate change | institutions engaged in negotiating an international response | institutions engaged in negotiating an international response | analysis of climate change processes | analysis of climate change processes | assessment of proposed policy measures | assessment of proposed policy measures | research | research | model development | model development | MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change | MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT) 14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or NGOs)? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful? In this course, we will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or NGOs)? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful?

Subjects

Economics | Economics | development | development | policy | policy | human | human | education | education | health | health | gender | gender | family | family | land | land | relations | relations | risk | risk | informal | informal | formal | formal | norms | norms | institutions | institutions | decisions | decisions | poor | poor | households | households | countries | countries | government | government | international | international | organizations | organizations | Non-governmental organizations | Non-governmental organizations | NGOs | NGOs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.418 Field Seminar in International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.418 Field Seminar in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations, including 17.420, 17.422, 17.424, 17.430, 17.432 and 17.468. Master's students and undergraduates may enroll only with the instructor's permission. This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations, including 17.420, 17.422, 17.424, 17.430, 17.432 and 17.468. Master's students and undergraduates may enroll only with the instructor's permission.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | anarchy | anarchy | power | power | international regimes and institutions | international regimes and institutions | strategic interaction | strategic interaction | agent-structure interactions | agent-structure interactions | foreign policy | foreign policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT) 14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT)

Description

This class focuses on labor institutions, the transformation of those institutions in the last three decades, and the possible relationship between that transformation and the shifting distribution of wage and salary income. The emphasis is on the United States and other advanced industrial countries, with some discussion of the relevance of the theory and analysis to developing economies. This class focuses on labor institutions, the transformation of those institutions in the last three decades, and the possible relationship between that transformation and the shifting distribution of wage and salary income. The emphasis is on the United States and other advanced industrial countries, with some discussion of the relevance of the theory and analysis to developing economies.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | labor | labor | institutions | institutions | unions | unions | worker motivation | worker motivation | technology | technology | social capital | social capital | networks | networks | identity | identity | careers | careers | transformation | transformation | distribution | distribution | wage | wage | salary | salary | income | income | United States | United States | advanced industrial countries | advanced industrial countries | theory | theory | analysis | analysis | developing economies | developing economies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology | culture studies | culture studies | cross-cultural | cross-cultural | ethnic identity | ethnic identity | gender identity | gender identity | religious identity | religious identity | racial identity | racial identity | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | social movements | social movements | identity politics | identity politics | indigenous rights movements | indigenous rights movements | transnational institutions | transnational institutions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT) 17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance. This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | sustainable development | sustainable development | industrialized nations | industrialized nations | aging population | aging population | consumption | consumption | developing countries | developing countries | economics | economics | production | production | sociology | sociology | technology | technology | regulation | regulation | public policy | public policy | environment | environment | business | business | aging | aging | population | population | countries | countries | developing | developing | development | development | industrial | industrial | industrialized | industrialized | nations | nations | politics | politics | political | political | theory | theory | sustainable | sustainable | public | public | policy | policy | sustainability | sustainability | economies | economies | transition | transition | growth | growth | institutions | institutions | institutional | institutional | trade | trade | international | international

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq,

Subjects

Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | Corruption | Corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.424 International Political Economy of Advanced Industrial Societies (MIT) 17.424 International Political Economy of Advanced Industrial Societies (MIT)

Description

This graduate class is designed as a Ph.D.-level overview of international political economy (IPE), with an emphasis on the advanced industrial countries. It also serves as preparation for the IPE portion of the International Relations general exam. An important goal of the course is to use economic theories to identify the welfare effects, distributional consequences, and security implication of foreign economic policy decisions, and to use the tools of political science to analyze how interest groups, voters, political parties, electoral institutions, ideas, and power politics interact to share policy outcomes. This graduate class is designed as a Ph.D.-level overview of international political economy (IPE), with an emphasis on the advanced industrial countries. It also serves as preparation for the IPE portion of the International Relations general exam. An important goal of the course is to use economic theories to identify the welfare effects, distributional consequences, and security implication of foreign economic policy decisions, and to use the tools of political science to analyze how interest groups, voters, political parties, electoral institutions, ideas, and power politics interact to share policy outcomes.

Subjects

International Trade | International Trade | Industries | Industries | International Monetary | International Monetary | International Financial Relations | International Financial Relations | International Political Economy and Security | International Political Economy and Security | Voters | Voters | Cleavages | Cleavages | institutions | institutions | structure | structure | Exchange Rate Regimes | Exchange Rate Regimes | Currency Crises | Currency Crises | International Capital Mobility | International Capital Mobility | Domestic Policymaking | Domestic Policymaking | Capital Account Openness | Capital Account Openness | Foreign Direct Investment | Foreign Direct Investment | Conflict | Conflict | Economic Interdependence | Economic Interdependence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.125 The Politics of Global Financial Relations (MIT) 17.125 The Politics of Global Financial Relations (MIT)

Description

This course explores effects of globalization of finance on international relations and domestic politics. Topics include international institutions and global governance; the multi-nationalization of production; effects of international capital markets on domestic politics; global finance and the developing world; and financial crises. Discussion of the interplay between politics and economics and the future of the nation-state. This course explores effects of globalization of finance on international relations and domestic politics. Topics include international institutions and global governance; the multi-nationalization of production; effects of international capital markets on domestic politics; global finance and the developing world; and financial crises. Discussion of the interplay between politics and economics and the future of the nation-state.

Subjects

multinational corporation | multinational corporation | bond market | bond market | welfare state | welfare state | foreign exchange market | foreign exchange market | exchange rate | exchange rate | IMF | IMF | global economy | global economy | globalization | globalization | finanical crime | finanical crime | money laundering | money laundering | international integration of capital markets | international integration of capital markets | national policymaking | national policymaking | foreign direct investment | foreign direct investment | international institutions | international institutions | global governance | global governance | global finance | global finance | developing world | developing world | financial crises | financial crises | domestic politics | domestic politics | currency crises | currency crises | Paul Krugman | Paul Krugman | J. Lawrence Broz | J. Lawrence Broz | Jeffry Frieden | Jeffry Frieden | global capitalism | global capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.522 Politics and Religion (MIT) 17.522 Politics and Religion (MIT)

Description

This graduate reading seminar explores the role of religious groups, institutions, and ideas in politics using social science theories. It is open to advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor. This graduate reading seminar explores the role of religious groups, institutions, and ideas in politics using social science theories. It is open to advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.

Subjects

social science | social science | institutions | institutions | ideology | ideology | policymaking | policymaking | state-building | state-building | democracy | democracy | regime change | regime change | conflict | conflict | war | war | political process | political process | nationalism | nationalism | terrorism | terrorism | social movment | social movment | modernization | modernization | secularization | secularization | church-state | church-state

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.317 U.S. Social Policy (MIT) 17.317 U.S. Social Policy (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the historical development and contemporary politics of social policy in the United States. We will discuss the kinds of risks individuals face over a lifetime and why some are ameliorated by social policy while others are not (and how the U.S. is similar or different from other countries in this regard). We will examine the policymaking process in the U.S., why some alternatives are implemented and others abandoned, why some interests are privileged over others, and how the designs of policies can feed back and shape politics in a given policy area. Along the way we will examine interactions among political institutions, policy elites, the media, and the mass public. This subject examines the historical development and contemporary politics of social policy in the United States. We will discuss the kinds of risks individuals face over a lifetime and why some are ameliorated by social policy while others are not (and how the U.S. is similar or different from other countries in this regard). We will examine the policymaking process in the U.S., why some alternatives are implemented and others abandoned, why some interests are privileged over others, and how the designs of policies can feed back and shape politics in a given policy area. Along the way we will examine interactions among political institutions, policy elites, the media, and the mass public.

Subjects

United States social policy | United States social policy | U.S. policymaking process | U.S. policymaking process | political institutions | political institutions | policy elites | policy elites | media | media | mass public | mass public | American exceptionalism | American exceptionalism | Congress | Congress | U.S. courts | U.S. courts | representative government and participation | representative government and participation | policy in practice | policy in practice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT) 17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT)

Description

This course continues from the fall semester. The course introduces students to the fundamental theories and methods of modern political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that have been influential in the field. This semester, the course focuses on American and comparative politics. This course continues from the fall semester. The course introduces students to the fundamental theories and methods of modern political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that have been influential in the field. This semester, the course focuses on American and comparative politics.

Subjects

American | American | foundations | foundations | politics | politics | political science | political science | comparative politics | comparative politics | social division | social division | identity | identity | ideology | ideology | beliefs | beliefs | participation | participation | institutions | institutions | outcomes | outcomes | system | system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.20 Introduction to the American Political Process (MIT) 17.20 Introduction to the American Political Process (MIT)

Description

This class introduces students to innovative as well as classic approaches to studying U.S. government. The writing assignments will help you explore, through a variety of lenses, statis and change in the American political system over the last three decades. In the end each student will have a solid grounding in our national political institutions and processes, sharper reading and writing skills, and insight into approaching politics critically and analytically. This class introduces students to innovative as well as classic approaches to studying U.S. government. The writing assignments will help you explore, through a variety of lenses, statis and change in the American political system over the last three decades. In the end each student will have a solid grounding in our national political institutions and processes, sharper reading and writing skills, and insight into approaching politics critically and analytically.

Subjects

united states | united states | american | american | politics | politics | government | government | voting | voting | institutions | institutions | policy | policy | legislation | legislation | elections | elections | campaigns | campaigns | public opinion | public opinion | political interests | political interests | welfare | welfare | analysis | analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.954 Community-Owned Enterprise and Civic Participation (MIT) 11.954 Community-Owned Enterprise and Civic Participation (MIT)

Description

This course will examine literature and practice regarding community-owned enterprise as an alternative means of increasing community participation and development. The use of cooperatives, credit unions, land trusts, and limited stock ownership enterprises for increasing community participation and empowerment will be examined. This course will examine literature and practice regarding community-owned enterprise as an alternative means of increasing community participation and development. The use of cooperatives, credit unions, land trusts, and limited stock ownership enterprises for increasing community participation and empowerment will be examined.

Subjects

cooperatives | cooperatives | capitalism | capitalism | participatory democracy | participatory democracy | social capital | social capital | community governance | community governance | politics | politics | economy | economy | power dynamics | power dynamics | environmental sustainability | environmental sustainability | economic development | economic development | markets | markets | institutions | institutions | community development | community development | poverty | poverty | real estate | real estate | trusts | trusts | housing coops | housing coops | banking | banking | unions | unions | pensions | pensions | investments | investments | privatization | privatization | gainsharing | gainsharing | remittances | remittances

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT) 9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT)

Description

Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

social animals | social animals | social | social | animals | animals | society | society | human society | human society | members | members | community | community | living together | living together | mutual benefit | mutual benefit | people | people | region | region | country | country | world | world | whole | whole | association | association | body | body | individuals | individuals | functional interdependence | functional interdependence | national or cultural identity | national or cultural identity | social solidarity | social solidarity | language or hierarchical organization | language or hierarchical organization | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | groups | groups | economic | economic | social or industrial infrastructure | social or industrial infrastructure | made up of a varied collection of individuals | made up of a varied collection of individuals | ethnic groups | ethnic groups | nation state | nation state | broader cultural group | broader cultural group | organized voluntary association of people for religious | organized voluntary association of people for religious | benevolent | benevolent | cultural | cultural | scientific | scientific | political | political | patriotic | patriotic | or other purposes. | or other purposes.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-9.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata