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Interfaces de Usuario Interfaces de Usuario

Description

El principal objetivo de esta asignatura consiste en formar a los alumnos en técnicas de diseño, prototipado y evaluación de interfaces de usuario. Se pretende así que el alumno sepa cómo analizar las tareas que el usuario tiene que realizar con una determinada aplicación, que sea capaz de tener en cuenta los aspectos fisiólogicos y cognitivos que influyen en la construcción de la interfaz de usuario, que pueda implementar interfaces de usuario que, siguiendo distintos estilos de interacción, se caractericen siempre por su utilidad y capacidad de ser usadas y que sea consciente de la necesidad de evaluar sus diseños de una forma sistemática. El principal objetivo de esta asignatura consiste en formar a los alumnos en técnicas de diseño, prototipado y evaluación de interfaces de usuario. Se pretende así que el alumno sepa cómo analizar las tareas que el usuario tiene que realizar con una determinada aplicación, que sea capaz de tener en cuenta los aspectos fisiólogicos y cognitivos que influyen en la construcción de la interfaz de usuario, que pueda implementar interfaces de usuario que, siguiendo distintos estilos de interacción, se caractericen siempre por su utilidad y capacidad de ser usadas y que sea consciente de la necesidad de evaluar sus diseños de una forma sistemática.

Subjects

ía de Computadores | ía de Computadores | interfaces web | interfaces web | ño HCI | ño HCI | ía en Informática | ía en Informática | usabilidad | usabilidad | 2009 | 2009 | interfaces de usuario | interfaces de usuario

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT) 15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed. Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | computers | future developments | future developments | networks | networks | distributed computing | distributed computing | programming languages | programming languages | firewall | firewall | e-business | e-business | computer architecture | computer architecture | operating | operating | software development | software development | database | database | user interface | user interface | telecommunication | telecommunication | data transmission | data transmission | local area network | local area network | wireless network | wireless network | internet | internet | world wide web | world wide web | digital security | digital security | architecture | architecture | data | data | transmission | transmission | wireless | wireless | interface | interface | user | user | software | software | development | development | programming | programming | languages | languages | distributed | distributed | computing | computing | LAN | LAN | local | local | area | area | future | future | digital | digital | security | security | technology | technology | information | information | management | management | systems | systems | relational | relational | graphical | graphical | interfaces | interfaces | client/server | client/server | enterprise | enterprise | applications | applications | cryptography | cryptography | services | services | Microsoft | Microsoft | Access | Access | Lotus Notes | Lotus Notes | processing | processing | memory | memory | I/O | I/O | CPU | CPU | OS | OS | hardware | hardware | compression | compression | SQL | SQL | queries | queries | design | design | WAN | WAN | wide | wide | Ethernet | Ethernet | packet-switched | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | peer-to-peer | WWW | WWW | public | public | key | key | mining | mining | warehousing | warehousing | concepts | concepts | conceptual | conceptual | modern computing | modern computing | information management | information management | operating systems | operating systems | relational database systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | client/server systems | enterprise applications | enterprise applications | web.internet services | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | Microsoft Access | database management systems | database management systems | information technology | information technology | telecommunications | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | eBusiness applications | client | client | servers | servers | wireless area network | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.128 Information Technology and the Labor Market (MIT) 11.128 Information Technology and the Labor Market (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will explore how information technology is reshaping the U.S. labor market: the mix of occupations, the skills required to perform an occupation, the way work is organized, labor productivity, wage levels and wage inequality.We begin from the perspective the brain is a wonderful information-processing instrument, but in those cases where a computer and the brain can process information in roughly the same way the computer can often do it at lower cost. This fact leads to a pair of crosscutting market forces:Information technology is opening up many new opportunities through its complementarity with some human skills.In both existing and new jobs, information technology is replacing human labor in certain tasks by substituting for other human skills.We will explore the cu In this course, we will explore how information technology is reshaping the U.S. labor market: the mix of occupations, the skills required to perform an occupation, the way work is organized, labor productivity, wage levels and wage inequality.We begin from the perspective the brain is a wonderful information-processing instrument, but in those cases where a computer and the brain can process information in roughly the same way the computer can often do it at lower cost. This fact leads to a pair of crosscutting market forces:Information technology is opening up many new opportunities through its complementarity with some human skills.In both existing and new jobs, information technology is replacing human labor in certain tasks by substituting for other human skills.We will explore the cu

Subjects

information technology | information technology | labor | labor | labor market | labor market | market forces | market forces | computers | computers | information processing | information processing | technological limits | technological limits | technology | technology | interfaces | interfaces | human interaction | human interaction | cognition | cognition | brain | brain | productivity | productivity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT) 6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT)

Description

6.831/6.813 examines human-computer interaction in the context of graphical user interfaces. The course covers human capabilities, design principles, prototyping techniques, evaluation techniques, and the implementation of graphical user interfaces. Deliverables include short programming assignments and a semester-long group project. Students taking the graduate version also have readings from current literature and additional assignments. 6.831/6.813 examines human-computer interaction in the context of graphical user interfaces. The course covers human capabilities, design principles, prototyping techniques, evaluation techniques, and the implementation of graphical user interfaces. Deliverables include short programming assignments and a semester-long group project. Students taking the graduate version also have readings from current literature and additional assignments.

Subjects

human-computer interaction | human-computer interaction | user interfaces | user interfaces | human capabilities | human capabilities | design principles | design principles | prototyping techniques | prototyping techniques | evaluation techniques | evaluation techniques

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.094 Introduction to MATLAB (MIT) 6.094 Introduction to MATLAB (MIT)

Description

This course provides an aggressively gentle introduction to MATLAB®. It is designed to give students fluency in MATLAB, including popular toolboxes. The course consists of interactive lectures with students doing sample MATLAB problems in real time. Problem-based MATLAB assignments are given which require significant time on MATLAB. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. Acknowledgements The 6.094 course materials were developed by Danilo Šćepanović, Sourav R. Dey, Ankit Patel, and Patrick Ho. This course provides an aggressively gentle introduction to MATLAB®. It is designed to give students fluency in MATLAB, including popular toolboxes. The course consists of interactive lectures with students doing sample MATLAB problems in real time. Problem-based MATLAB assignments are given which require significant time on MATLAB. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. Acknowledgements The 6.094 course materials were developed by Danilo Šćepanović, Sourav R. Dey, Ankit Patel, and Patrick Ho.

Subjects

introduction to MATLAB | introduction to MATLAB | scripts | scripts | making variables | making variables | manipulating variables | manipulating variables | functions | functions | flow control | flow control | line plots | line plots | surface plots | surface plots | vectorization | vectorization | linear algebra | linear algebra | optimization | optimization | differential equations | differential equations | data structures | data structures | debugging | debugging | animation | animation | symbolic math | symbolic math | Simulink | Simulink | file input/output | file input/output | graphical user interfaces | graphical user interfaces

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.092 Introduction to Programming in Java (MIT) 6.092 Introduction to Programming in Java (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to software engineering, using the Java™ programming language. It covers concepts useful to 6.005. Students will learn the fundamentals of Java. The focus is on developing high quality, working software that solves real problems. The course is designed for students with some programming experience, but if you have none and are motivated you will do fine. Students who have taken 6.005 should not take this course. Each class is composed of one hour of lecture and one hour of assisted lab work. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This course is an introduction to software engineering, using the Java™ programming language. It covers concepts useful to 6.005. Students will learn the fundamentals of Java. The focus is on developing high quality, working software that solves real problems. The course is designed for students with some programming experience, but if you have none and are motivated you will do fine. Students who have taken 6.005 should not take this course. Each class is composed of one hour of lecture and one hour of assisted lab work. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

software engineering | software engineering | Java fundamentals | Java fundamentals | methods | methods | conditionals | conditionals | loops | loops | arrays | arrays | objects | objects | classes | classes | object oriented programming | object oriented programming | access control | access control | class scope | class scope | design | design | debugging | debugging | interfaces | interfaces | inheritance | inheritance | exceptions | exceptions | input/output | input/output

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT) 9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT)

Description

Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals. Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals.

Subjects

Behavioral modification | Behavioral modification | ethology | ethology | sociobiology | sociobiology | learning | learning | Social Status | Social Status | Cross-Cultural Differences | Cross-Cultural Differences | Persuasion | Persuasion | Politics | Politics | Individual | Individual | Sexuality | Sexuality | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | social organization | social organization | dominance structures | dominance structures | evolution of sexual signals | evolution of sexual signals | emancipation | emancipation | Mating | Mating | reproduction | reproduction | Emotion | Emotion | Facial Expression | Facial Expression | Displays | Displays | General Non-Verbal Communication | General Non-Verbal Communication | Sex Modeling behaviors | Sex Modeling behaviors | Machine interfaces | Machine interfaces | Cognitive ethology | Cognitive ethology | Comparative cognition | Comparative cognition | Signs | Signs | Symbols | Symbols | pharmacology | pharmacology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.828 Operating System Engineering (MIT) 6.828 Operating System Engineering (MIT)

Description

6.828 teaches the fundamentals of engineering operating systems. The following topics are studied in detail: virtual memory, kernel and user mode, system calls, threads, context switches, interrupts, interprocess communication, coordination of concurrent activities, and the interface between software and hardware. Most importantly, the interactions between these concepts are examined. The course is divided into two blocks; the first block introduces one operating system, UNIX® v6, in detail. The second block of lectures covers important operating systems concepts invented after UNIX® v6, which was introduced in 1976.Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is req 6.828 teaches the fundamentals of engineering operating systems. The following topics are studied in detail: virtual memory, kernel and user mode, system calls, threads, context switches, interrupts, interprocess communication, coordination of concurrent activities, and the interface between software and hardware. Most importantly, the interactions between these concepts are examined. The course is divided into two blocks; the first block introduces one operating system, UNIX® v6, in detail. The second block of lectures covers important operating systems concepts invented after UNIX® v6, which was introduced in 1976.Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is req

Subjects

operating system | operating system | OS | OS | UNIX | UNIX | virtual memory | virtual memory | threads | threads | context switches | context switches | kernels | kernels | interrupts | interrupts | system calls | system calls | interprocess communication | interprocess communication | C | C | x86 assembly | x86 assembly | programming | programming | computer engineering | computer engineering | kernal mode | kernal mode | user mode | user mode | concurrent activities | concurrent activities | interfaces | interfaces | software/hardware interface | software/hardware interface | boot loaders | boot loaders | memory management | memory management | processes switching | processes switching | fork | fork | IPC | IPC | file systems | file systems | shells | shells | Exec | Exec

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.430J Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems (MIT) 20.430J Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental driving forces for transport—chemical gradients, electrical interactions, and fluid flow—as applied to the biology and biophysics of molecules, cells, and tissues. This course covers the fundamental driving forces for transport—chemical gradients, electrical interactions, and fluid flow—as applied to the biology and biophysics of molecules, cells, and tissues.

Subjects

diffusion | diffusion | molecular diffusion | molecular diffusion | diffusion-reaction | diffusion-reaction | conduction | conduction | convection | convection | biological systems | biological systems | fields | fields | electrical double layers | electrical double layers | Maxwell stress tensor | Maxwell stress tensor | physiological systems | physiological systems | fluid | fluid | solid | solid | equations of motion | equations of motion | case study | case study | electrode interfaces | electrode interfaces | transduction | transduction | random walk | random walk | Stokes-Einstein | Stokes-Einstein | Fick's laws | Fick's laws | reaction | reaction | Damköhler number | Damköhler number

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT) 9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT)

Description

Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals. Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals.

Subjects

Behavioral modification | Behavioral modification | ethology | ethology | sociobiology | sociobiology | learning | learning | Social Status | Social Status | Cross-Cultural Differences | Cross-Cultural Differences | Persuasion | Persuasion | Politics | Politics | Individual | Individual | Sexuality | Sexuality | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | social organization | social organization | dominance structures | dominance structures | evolution of sexual signals | evolution of sexual signals | emancipation | emancipation | Mating | Mating | reproduction | reproduction | Emotion | Emotion | Facial Expression | Facial Expression | Displays | Displays | General Non-Verbal Communication | General Non-Verbal Communication | Sex Modeling behaviors | Sex Modeling behaviors | Machine interfaces | Machine interfaces | Cognitive ethology | Cognitive ethology | Comparative cognition | Comparative cognition | Signs | Signs | Symbols | Symbols | pharmacology | pharmacology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.128 Information Technology and the Labor Market (MIT) 11.128 Information Technology and the Labor Market (MIT)

Description

This course explores how information technology is reshaping different dimensions of the U.S. labor market: the way work is organized, the mix of occupations, the skills required to perform in an occupation, economy-wide labor productivity, and the distribution of wages. This course explores how information technology is reshaping different dimensions of the U.S. labor market: the way work is organized, the mix of occupations, the skills required to perform in an occupation, economy-wide labor productivity, and the distribution of wages.

Subjects

information technology | information technology | labor | labor | labor market | labor market | market forces | market forces | computers | computers | information processing | information processing | technological limits | technological limits | technology | technology | interfaces | interfaces | human interaction | human interaction | cognition | cognition | brain | brain | productivity | productivity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.011J Statistical Thermodynamics of Biomolecular Systems (BE.011J) (MIT) 20.011J Statistical Thermodynamics of Biomolecular Systems (BE.011J) (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the physical chemistry of biological systems. Topics include: connection of macroscopic thermodynamic properties to microscopic molecular properties using statistical mechanics, chemical potentials, equilibrium states, binding cooperativity, behavior of macromolecules in solution and at interfaces, and solvation. Example problems include protein structure, genomic analysis, single molecule biomechanics, and biomaterials. This course provides an introduction to the physical chemistry of biological systems. Topics include: connection of macroscopic thermodynamic properties to microscopic molecular properties using statistical mechanics, chemical potentials, equilibrium states, binding cooperativity, behavior of macromolecules in solution and at interfaces, and solvation. Example problems include protein structure, genomic analysis, single molecule biomechanics, and biomaterials.

Subjects

physical chemistry of biological systems | physical chemistry of biological systems | macroscopic thermodynamic properties | macroscopic thermodynamic properties | microscopic molecular properties | microscopic molecular properties | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | chemical potentials | chemical potentials | equilibrium states | equilibrium states | binding cooperativity | binding cooperativity | behavior of macromolecules in solution and at interfaces | behavior of macromolecules in solution and at interfaces | solvation | solvation | protein structure | protein structure | genomic analysis | genomic analysis | single molecule biomechanics | single molecule biomechanics | biomaterials | biomaterials | BE.011J | BE.011J | BE.011 | BE.011 | 2.772 | 2.772

License

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6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT) 6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT)

Description

6.831 introduces the principles of user interface development, focusing on three key areas: Design: How to design good user interfaces, starting with human capabilities (including the human information processor model, perception, motor skills, color, attention, and errors) and using those capabilities to drive design techniques: task analysis, user-centered design, iterative design, usability guidelines, interaction styles, and graphic design principles. Implementation: Techniques for building user interfaces, including low-fidelity prototypes, Wizard of Oz, and other prototyping tools; input models, output models, model-view-controller, layout, constraints, and toolkits. Evaluation: Techniques for evaluating and measuring interface usability, including heuristic evaluation, predicti 6.831 introduces the principles of user interface development, focusing on three key areas: Design: How to design good user interfaces, starting with human capabilities (including the human information processor model, perception, motor skills, color, attention, and errors) and using those capabilities to drive design techniques: task analysis, user-centered design, iterative design, usability guidelines, interaction styles, and graphic design principles. Implementation: Techniques for building user interfaces, including low-fidelity prototypes, Wizard of Oz, and other prototyping tools; input models, output models, model-view-controller, layout, constraints, and toolkits. Evaluation: Techniques for evaluating and measuring interface usability, including heuristic evaluation, predicti

Subjects

human-computer interfaces | human-computer interfaces | human capabilities | human capabilities | human information processor | human information processor | perception | perception | Fitts's Law | Fitts's Law | color | color | hearing | hearing | task analysis | task analysis | user-centered design | user-centered design | iterative design | iterative design | low-fidelity prototyping | low-fidelity prototyping | heuristic evaluation | heuristic evaluation | keystroke-level models | keystroke-level models | formative evaluation | formative evaluation | input models | input models | output models | output models | model-view-controller | model-view-controller | toolkits | toolkits | programming project | programming project | GUI | GUI | Java | Java

License

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6.092 Java Preparation for 6.170 (MIT) 6.092 Java Preparation for 6.170 (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on introducing the language, libraries, tools and concepts of JavaTM. The course is specifically targeted at students who intend to take 6.170 in the following term and feel they would struggle because they lack the necessary background. Topics include: Object-oriented programming, primitives, arrays, objects, inheritance, interfaces, polymorphism, hashing, data structures, collections, nested classes, floating point precision, defensive programming, and depth-first search algorithm. This course focuses on introducing the language, libraries, tools and concepts of JavaTM. The course is specifically targeted at students who intend to take 6.170 in the following term and feel they would struggle because they lack the necessary background. Topics include: Object-oriented programming, primitives, arrays, objects, inheritance, interfaces, polymorphism, hashing, data structures, collections, nested classes, floating point precision, defensive programming, and depth-first search algorithm.

Subjects

Object oriented programming | Object oriented programming | Java program structure | Java program structure | class file | main | methods | fields | class file | main | methods | fields | Primitives | Primitives | Control flow | method calls | if/then | for loop | while loop | Control flow | method calls | if/then | for loop | while loop | Arrays | Arrays | Objects | declaration | assignment | mutation | scope | Objects | declaration | assignment | mutation | scope | Classes vs Objects/Instances | Classes vs Objects/Instances | Method Overloading | Method Overloading | Inheritence | Inheritence | Abstract superclasses | Abstract superclasses | Interfaces | Interfaces | Polymorphism | Polymorphism | Method Overriding | Method Overriding | Hashing | Hashing | Data structures | Data structures | Collections | Collections | Advanced control flow | Advanced control flow | Writing interfaces | abstract classes | Writing interfaces | abstract classes | True subtyping | composite | True subtyping | composite | Throwing and catching exceptions | Throwing and catching exceptions | Nested classes | Nested classes | Floating point precision | Floating point precision | Defensive programming | Defensive programming | Depth First Search alogithm | Depth First Search alogithm

License

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BE.011J Statistical Thermodynamics of Biomolecular Systems (MIT) BE.011J Statistical Thermodynamics of Biomolecular Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the physical chemistry of biological systems. Topics include: connection of macroscopic thermodynamic properties to microscopic molecular properties using statistical mechanics, chemical potentials, equilibrium states, binding cooperativity, behavior of macromolecules in solution and at interfaces, and solvation. Example problems include protein structure, genomic analysis, single molecule biomechanics, and biomaterials.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m and .fig files found on this course site. This course provides an introduction to the physical chemistry of biological systems. Topics include: connection of macroscopic thermodynamic properties to microscopic molecular properties using statistical mechanics, chemical potentials, equilibrium states, binding cooperativity, behavior of macromolecules in solution and at interfaces, and solvation. Example problems include protein structure, genomic analysis, single molecule biomechanics, and biomaterials.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m and .fig files found on this course site.

Subjects

physical chemistry of biological systems | physical chemistry of biological systems | macroscopic thermodynamic properties | macroscopic thermodynamic properties | microscopic molecular properties | microscopic molecular properties | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | chemical potentials | chemical potentials | equilibrium states | equilibrium states | binding cooperativity | binding cooperativity | behavior of macromolecules in solution and at interfaces | behavior of macromolecules in solution and at interfaces | solvation | solvation | protein structure | protein structure | genomic analysis | genomic analysis | single molecule biomechanics | single molecule biomechanics | biomaterials | biomaterials | 2.772J | 2.772J | BE.011 | BE.011 | 2.772 | 2.772

License

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

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MAS.961 Ambient Intelligence (MIT) MAS.961 Ambient Intelligence (MIT)

Description

This course will provide an overview of a new vision for Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) in which people are surrounded by intelligent and intuitive interfaces embedded in the everyday objects around them. It will focus on understanding enabling technologies and studying applications and experiments, and, to a lesser extent, it will address the socio-cultural impact. Students will read and discuss the most relevant articles in related areas: smart environments, smart networked objects, augmented and mixed realities, ubiquitous computing, pervasive computing, tangible computing, intelligent interfaces and wearable computing. Finally, they will be asked to come up with new ideas and start innovative projects in this area. This course will provide an overview of a new vision for Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) in which people are surrounded by intelligent and intuitive interfaces embedded in the everyday objects around them. It will focus on understanding enabling technologies and studying applications and experiments, and, to a lesser extent, it will address the socio-cultural impact. Students will read and discuss the most relevant articles in related areas: smart environments, smart networked objects, augmented and mixed realities, ubiquitous computing, pervasive computing, tangible computing, intelligent interfaces and wearable computing. Finally, they will be asked to come up with new ideas and start innovative projects in this area.

Subjects

HCI | HCI | smart environments | smart environments | smart networked objects | smart networked objects | augmented and mixed realities | augmented and mixed realities | ubiquitous computing | ubiquitous computing | pervasive computing | pervasive computing | tangible computing | tangible computing | intelligent interfaces | intelligent interfaces | wearable computing | wearable computing

License

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MAS.963 Ambient Intelligence (MIT) MAS.963 Ambient Intelligence (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on Ambient Intelligence, and how it envisions a world where people are surrounded by intelligent and intuitive interfaces embedded in the everyday objects around them. These interfaces recognize and respond to the presence and behavior of an individual in a personalized and relevant way. Students are required to do extensive literary research on the subject and participate in class discussions. This course focuses on Ambient Intelligence, and how it envisions a world where people are surrounded by intelligent and intuitive interfaces embedded in the everyday objects around them. These interfaces recognize and respond to the presence and behavior of an individual in a personalized and relevant way. Students are required to do extensive literary research on the subject and participate in class discussions.

Subjects

HCI | HCI | smart environments | smart environments | smart networked objects | smart networked objects | augmented and mixed realities | augmented and mixed realities | ubiquitous computing | ubiquitous computing | pervasive computing | pervasive computing | tangible computing | tangible computing | intelligent interfaces | intelligent interfaces | wearable computing | wearable computing

License

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6.094 Introduction to MATLAB (MIT)

Description

This course provides an aggressively gentle introduction to MATLAB®. It is designed to give students fluency in MATLAB, including popular toolboxes. The course consists of interactive lectures with students doing sample MATLAB problems in real time. Problem-based MATLAB assignments are given which require significant time on MATLAB. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. Acknowledgements The 6.094 course materials were developed by Danilo ??epanovi?, Sourav R. Dey, Ankit Patel, and Patrick Ho.

Subjects

introduction to MATLAB | scripts | making variables | manipulating variables | functions | flow control | line plots | surface plots | vectorization | linear algebra | optimization | differential equations | data structures | debugging | animation | symbolic math | Simulink | file input/output | graphical user interfaces

License

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6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT)

Description

6.831 introduces the principles of user interface development, focusing on three key areas: Design: How to design good user interfaces, starting with human capabilities (including the human information processor model, perception, motor skills, color, attention, and errors) and using those capabilities to drive design techniques: task analysis, user-centered design, iterative design, usability guidelines, interaction styles, and graphic design principles. Implementation: Techniques for building user interfaces, including low-fidelity prototypes, Wizard of Oz, and other prototyping tools; input models, output models, model-view-controller, layout, constraints, and toolkits. Evaluation: Techniques for evaluating and measuring interface usability, including heuristic evaluation, predicti

Subjects

human-computer interfaces | human capabilities | human information processor | perception | Fitts's Law | color | hearing | task analysis | user-centered design | iterative design | low-fidelity prototyping | heuristic evaluation | keystroke-level models | formative evaluation | input models | output models | model-view-controller | toolkits | programming project | GUI | Java

License

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6.092 Introduction to Programming in Java (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to software engineering, using the Java™ programming language. It covers concepts useful to 6.005. Students will learn the fundamentals of Java. The focus is on developing high quality, working software that solves real problems. The course is designed for students with some programming experience, but if you have none and are motivated you will do fine. Students who have taken 6.005 should not take this course. Each class is composed of one hour of lecture and one hour of assisted lab work. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

software engineering | Java fundamentals | methods | conditionals | loops | arrays | objects | classes | object oriented programming | access control | class scope | design | debugging | interfaces | inheritance | exceptions | input/output

License

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BE.011J Statistical Thermodynamics of Biomolecular Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the physical chemistry of biological systems. Topics include: connection of macroscopic thermodynamic properties to microscopic molecular properties using statistical mechanics, chemical potentials, equilibrium states, binding cooperativity, behavior of macromolecules in solution and at interfaces, and solvation. Example problems include protein structure, genomic analysis, single molecule biomechanics, and biomaterials.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m and .fig files found on this course site.

Subjects

physical chemistry of biological systems | macroscopic thermodynamic properties | microscopic molecular properties | statistical mechanics | chemical potentials | equilibrium states | binding cooperativity | behavior of macromolecules in solution and at interfaces | solvation | protein structure | genomic analysis | single molecule biomechanics | biomaterials | 2.772J | BE.011 | 2.772

License

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9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT)

Description

Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals.

Subjects

Behavioral modification | ethology | sociobiology | learning | Social Status | Cross-Cultural Differences | Persuasion | Politics | Individual | Sexuality | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | social organization | dominance structures | evolution of sexual signals | emancipation | Mating | reproduction | Emotion | Facial Expression | Displays | General Non-Verbal Communication | Sex Modeling behaviors | Machine interfaces | Cognitive ethology | Comparative cognition | Signs | Symbols | pharmacology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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