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17.559 Comparative Security and Sustainability (MIT) 17.559 Comparative Security and Sustainability (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the complexities associated with security and sustainability of states in international relations. Covering aspects of theory, methods and empirical analysis, the course is in three parts, and each consists of seminar sessions focusing on specific topics. This course focuses on the complexities associated with security and sustainability of states in international relations. Covering aspects of theory, methods and empirical analysis, the course is in three parts, and each consists of seminar sessions focusing on specific topics.

Subjects

security; sustainability; international relations; comparative approaches; constraints; options; strategies; policy choice; developing and industrial nations; decision; trade-offs; inter-temporal effects; technology; design systems; | security; sustainability; international relations; comparative approaches; constraints; options; strategies; policy choice; developing and industrial nations; decision; trade-offs; inter-temporal effects; technology; design systems; | security | security | sustainability | sustainability | international relations | international relations | comparative approaches | comparative approaches | constraints | constraints | options | options | strategies | strategies | policy choice | policy choice | developing and industrial nations | developing and industrial nations | decision | decision | trade-offs | trade-offs | inter-temporal effects | inter-temporal effects | technology | technology | design systems | design systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.407 Chinese Foreign Policy (MIT) 17.407 Chinese Foreign Policy (MIT)

Description

This lecture course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the international relations of the People’s Republic of China. China’s foreign relations during the Cold War as well as contemporary diplomatic, security and economic issues will be examined to identify and explain China’s foreign policy goals and their implementation since 1949. Throughout, this course will investigate the sources of conflict and cooperation in China’s behavior, assessing competing explanations for key events and policies. Readings will be drawn from political science, history, and international relations theory. This lecture course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the international relations of the People’s Republic of China. China’s foreign relations during the Cold War as well as contemporary diplomatic, security and economic issues will be examined to identify and explain China’s foreign policy goals and their implementation since 1949. Throughout, this course will investigate the sources of conflict and cooperation in China’s behavior, assessing competing explanations for key events and policies. Readings will be drawn from political science, history, and international relations theory.

Subjects

China | China | chinese | chinese | foreign | foreign | policy | policy | international relations | international relations | People?s Republic of China | People?s Republic of China | foreign relations | foreign relations | Cold War | Cold War | contemporary | contemporary | diplomatic | diplomatic | security | security | economic | economic | 1949 | 1949 | conflict | conflict | cooperation | cooperation | behavior | behavior | competing explanations | competing explanations | key events | key events | political science | political science | history | history | international relations theory | international relations theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Understanding global politics

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009. This module introduces global politics through the major theoretical, historical and empirical ways of seeing international relations. Different claims, about, for example, human nature, power, war, peace, the state, society, law and politics are offered by thinkers who exercise a major influence on our contemporary understanding. These claims contribute to different approaches to politics in a global context. Suitable for: Undergraduate level one students Dr Vanessa Pupavac, Dr Xiaoke Zhang, Dr Sabine Carey, School of Politics and International Relations Dr Vanessa Pupavac is a lecturer in International Relations at the University of Nottingham. She has previously worked for

Subjects

ukoer | global politics | international relations | politics | realism | liberalism | social constructivism | marxist theories of international relations | ethics and international relations | international history versus international relations | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Decade Ahead: The US Role in the World (2012 Fulbright Lecture)

Description

Ambassador Thomas Pickering delivers the second Annual Oxford Fulbright Lecture on International Relations. This lecture took place on 18 May 2012. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

politics | UN | international relations | United Nations | iran | politics | UN | international relations | United Nations | iran | 2012-05-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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PPE Alumni in Conversation: April 2011

Description

A conversation between Elizabeth Frazer (PPE, 1984; DPhil 1987), Matthew Powell (PPE, 2010) and Nick Alexander (PPE, 1976). Matthew and Nick discuss their learning experiences at Oxford across the internet divide, and find that they have much in common. Nick has just started his 30th year in the video game business where he is currently Executive Chairman of Connect2Media and Non-executive Chairman of TeePee Games; Matthew is currently studying for the MPhil in Comparative Government. A forum to discuss this podcast is available at http://www.politics.ox.ac.uk/index.php/in-conversation/in-conversation.html Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

politics | alumni | ppe | international relations | politics | alumni | ppe | international relations | 2011-04-20

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Turn: American Foreign Policy 2009 to 2011 - Inaugural Fulbright Lecture in International Relations

Description

Inaugural Fulbright lecture in International Relations, given at St Antony's College to commemorate Senator J. William Fulbright, one of Oxford's most distinguished alumni and founder of the Fulbright Programme of Academic Exchanges. Professor Slaughter discussed how the nature of US foreign policy during the Obama administration has shifted from purely government - government diplomacy to place far greater emphasis on government - society relations and on society - society relations. As part of this shift development has come to assume a much higher priority in US foreign policy, alongside defence and traditional diplomacy. Introduced by Professor Sir Adam Roberts and Professor Andrew Hurrell and hosted by the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford, in association with the US-UK Fu Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

politics | america | international relations | fullbright | diplomacy | politics | america | international relations | fullbright | diplomacy | 2011-05-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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International Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect

Description

Professor Neil MacFarlane, Fellow in International Relations gives a talk on Humanitarian aid, the responsibility of the international community to protect individuals and groups on 18th June 2011. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

politics | humanitarianism | international relations | international aid | politics | humanitarianism | international relations | international aid | 2011-06-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Oxford at Said Seminar: Oxford and Oxfam working together on the ethics of war, weapons and humanitarian aid

Description

The practice of protecting unarmed civilians amidst the fierce violence of international and non-international war contends with extreme political realities and rapidly developing robotic weapons technology. Hear how Oxford and Oxfam are working together. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

human rights | international relations | ICC | humanitarian aid | weapons | robotic weapons | UN | oxfam | drones | ethics | war | human rights | international relations | ICC | humanitarian aid | weapons | robotic weapons | UN | oxfam | drones | ethics | war

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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American-Sino Relations: Review

Description

In the third and final part of this series, Rosemary Foot reviews and critiques the four factors outlined in the previous episode which could hinder good relations between the two nations. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

international relations | finance | power | climate change | china | nuclear | politics | america | international relations | finance | power | climate change | china | nuclear | politics | america

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.418 Field Seminar: International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.418 Field Seminar: International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations. This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | security | security | anarchy | anarchy | power | power | identity | identity | domestic policy | domestic policy | war | war | conflict | conflict | military | military | peace | peace | cooperation | cooperation | compliance | compliance | democracy | democracy | politics | politics | unipolarity | unipolarity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights. This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights.

Subjects

human rights | human rights | public international law | public international law | history | history | universality | universality | cultural specificity | cultural specificity | NGO's | NGO's | duty-based | duty-based | rights | rights | social movements | social movements | law | law | international relations | international relations | sociology | sociology | political science | political science | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | government regulation | government regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.418 Field Seminar in International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.418 Field Seminar in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations, including 17.420, 17.422, 17.424, 17.430, 17.432 and 17.468. Master's students and undergraduates may enroll only with the instructor's permission. This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations, including 17.420, 17.422, 17.424, 17.430, 17.432 and 17.468. Master's students and undergraduates may enroll only with the instructor's permission.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | anarchy | anarchy | power | power | international regimes and institutions | international regimes and institutions | strategic interaction | strategic interaction | agent-structure interactions | agent-structure interactions | foreign policy | foreign policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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International Relations (MIT) International Relations (MIT)

Description

This graduate course is divided intothree parts. Together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries - with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior. This graduate course is divided intothree parts. Together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries - with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior.

Subjects

globalization | globalization | migration | migration | international relations | international relations | political science | political science | environment | environment | public policy | public policy | transnational organization | transnational organization | sustainable development | sustainable development | global change | global change | government | government | technology | technology | security | security | civil society | civil society | political theory | political theory | theory | theory | policy | policy | emergent structures | emergent structures | processes | processes | flows | flows | goods | goods | services | services | national boundaries | national boundaries | international trade | international trade | immigration | immigration | international policies | international policies | macro-level | macro-level | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | comparative politics | comparative politics | integration | integration | national economies | national economies | IR | IR | IPE | IPE | sovereignty | sovereignty | inter-state relations | inter-state relations | supra-state | supra-state | non-state | non-state | narrow globalization | narrow globalization | comlex view | comlex view | international conflict | international conflict | domestic politics | domestic politics | international politics | international politics | population movements | population movements | macro-level behavior | macro-level behavior | complex view | complex view

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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After the Abolition of Slavery and Colonialism, War as a Social Institution: The Role of England

Description

A plenary session from the 'Building Peace' conference organized by the Oxford Network for Peace Studies and hosted by St John's College, Oxford on 15 May 2010. Professor Johan Galtung - Norwegian sociologist and 'father' of academic peace studies - offers a contextual example of applied peace studies. Professor Galtung is the Co-Director of the Transcent Research Institute, which he co-founded in 1993 after founding of the Oslo-based International Peace Research Institute (PRIO) in 1959 and serving as a Professor of Peace and Conflict Research at Oslo University from 1969-1978. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

building peace | s college | peace | international relations | politics | s college | peace | international relations | politics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Defining Peace and Debating Peace in Relation to War. OxPeace 2010

Description

A breakout session of the Building Peace conference organized by the Oxford Network for Peace Studies and hosted by St John's College, Oxford on 15 May 2010. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

building peace | s college | peace | international relations | politics | s college | peace | international relations | politics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.447 Cyberpolitics in International Relations: Theory, Methods, Policy (MIT) 17.447 Cyberpolitics in International Relations: Theory, Methods, Policy (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on cyberspace and its implications for private and public, sub-national, national, and international actors and entities. This course focuses on cyberspace and its implications for private and public, sub-national, national, and international actors and entities.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | internet | internet | cyberspace | cyberspace | globalization | globalization | cybersecurity | cybersecurity | spam | spam | cyberthreats | cyberthreats | international governance | international governance | international law | international law

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.418 Field Seminar: International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.418 Field Seminar: International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations. This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | security | security | anarchy | anarchy | power | power | identity | identity | domestic policy | domestic policy | war | war | conflict | conflict | military | military | peace | peace | cooperation | cooperation | compliance | compliance | democracy | democracy | politics | politics | unipolarity | unipolarity | nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | rationalism | rationalism | international | international

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.407 Chinese Foreign Policy: International Relations and Strategy (MIT) 17.407 Chinese Foreign Policy: International Relations and Strategy (MIT)

Description

China's rise as a great power raises important questions about how that power might be used in its relations with other states. Nowhere are such questions more salient than in the future trajectory of China's conflict behavior, including its approach to deterrence, crisis management and the use of force. To explore these important questions in China's international relations, this seminar examines the evolution of Chinese strategic thought, in primary sources as well as its reflection in the interactions among Chinese states and between China and other states. China's rise as a great power raises important questions about how that power might be used in its relations with other states. Nowhere are such questions more salient than in the future trajectory of China's conflict behavior, including its approach to deterrence, crisis management and the use of force. To explore these important questions in China's international relations, this seminar examines the evolution of Chinese strategic thought, in primary sources as well as its reflection in the interactions among Chinese states and between China and other states.

Subjects

China | China | strategy | strategy | military | military | mao zedong | mao zedong | the Art of War | the Art of War | ancient chinese thought | ancient chinese thought | conflict | conflict | international relations | international relations | foreign policy | foreign policy | modern China | modern China | contemporary China | contemporary China | chinese literature | chinese literature | Chinese military history | Chinese military history | Chinese intellectualy history | Chinese intellectualy history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.441 International Politics and Climate Change (MIT) 17.441 International Politics and Climate Change (MIT)

Description

This course examines the interconnections of international politics and climate change. Beginning with an analysis of the strategic and environmental legacies of the 20th Century, it explores the politicization of the natural environment, the role of science in this process, and the gradual shifts in political concerns to incorporate "nature". Two general thrusts of climate-politics connections are pursued, namely those related to (a) conflict – focusing on threats to security due to environmental dislocations and (b) cooperation – focusing on the politics of international treaties that have contributed to emergent processes for global accord in response to evidence of climate change. The course concludes by addressing the question of: "What Next?" This course examines the interconnections of international politics and climate change. Beginning with an analysis of the strategic and environmental legacies of the 20th Century, it explores the politicization of the natural environment, the role of science in this process, and the gradual shifts in political concerns to incorporate "nature". Two general thrusts of climate-politics connections are pursued, namely those related to (a) conflict – focusing on threats to security due to environmental dislocations and (b) cooperation – focusing on the politics of international treaties that have contributed to emergent processes for global accord in response to evidence of climate change. The course concludes by addressing the question of: "What Next?"

Subjects

international politics | international politics | climate change | climate change | biodiversity | biodiversity | Kyoto Protocol | Kyoto Protocol | Tragedy of the Commons | Tragedy of the Commons | economics | economics | environment | environment | human population | human population | international relations | international relations | global | global | United Nations (UN) | United Nations (UN) | environmental cooperation | environmental cooperation | sustainable energy | sustainable energy | sustainability | sustainability | Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) | Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) | environmental assessment | environmental assessment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.410 Globalization, Migration, and International Relations (MIT) 17.410 Globalization, Migration, and International Relations (MIT)

Description

Tracing the evolution of international interactions, this course examines the dimensions of globalization in terms of scale and scope. It is divided into three parts; together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries – with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior. 17.411 fulfills undergraduate public policy requirement in the major and minor. Graduate students are exp Tracing the evolution of international interactions, this course examines the dimensions of globalization in terms of scale and scope. It is divided into three parts; together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries – with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior. 17.411 fulfills undergraduate public policy requirement in the major and minor. Graduate students are exp

Subjects

globalization | globalization | migration | migration | international relations | international relations | political science | political science | environment | environment | public policy | public policy | transnational organization | transnational organization | sustainable development | sustainable development | global change | global change | government | government | technology | technology | security | security | civil society | civil society | political theory | political theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.918 New Global Agenda: Exploring 21st Century Challenges through Innovations in Information Technologies (MIT) 17.918 New Global Agenda: Exploring 21st Century Challenges through Innovations in Information Technologies (MIT)

Description

This workshop is designed to introduce students to different perspectives on international politics in the 21st century. Students will explore how advances in information technology are changing international relations and global governance through opening new channels of communication, creating new methods of education, and new potentials for democratization. We will consider the positive and negative externalities associated with applications of such technologies. Students will be encouraged to look at alternative futures, and/or to frame solutions to problems that they define. The class will include guest lectures, discussions, and a final project and presentation. This workshop is designed to introduce students to different perspectives on international politics in the 21st century. Students will explore how advances in information technology are changing international relations and global governance through opening new channels of communication, creating new methods of education, and new potentials for democratization. We will consider the positive and negative externalities associated with applications of such technologies. Students will be encouraged to look at alternative futures, and/or to frame solutions to problems that they define. The class will include guest lectures, discussions, and a final project and presentation.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | global | global | Twenty-first Century | Twenty-first Century | innovation | innovation | challenges | challenges | information technology | information technology | workshop | workshop | international politics | international politics | international relations | international relations | global governance | global governance | communication | communication | education | education | democratization | democratization | alternative futures | alternative futures | solutions | solutions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.905 Forms of Political Participation: Old and New (MIT) 17.905 Forms of Political Participation: Old and New (MIT)

Description

How and why do we participate in public life? How do we get drawn into community and political affairs? In this course we examine the associations and networks that connect us to one another and structure our social and political interactions. Readings are drawn from a growing body of research suggesting that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities represented by the concepts of civil society and social capital can have important effects on the functioning of democracy, stability and change in political regimes, the capacity of states to carry out their objectives, and international politics. How and why do we participate in public life? How do we get drawn into community and political affairs? In this course we examine the associations and networks that connect us to one another and structure our social and political interactions. Readings are drawn from a growing body of research suggesting that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities represented by the concepts of civil society and social capital can have important effects on the functioning of democracy, stability and change in political regimes, the capacity of states to carry out their objectives, and international politics.

Subjects

community | community | public life | public life | social network | social network | norms | norms | association | association | civil society | civil society | international relations | international relations | politics | politics | democracy | democracy | social capital | social capital | state | state | NGO | NGO | globalization | globalization | power | power | corruption | corruption | gender | gender | citizen | citizen | rebellion | rebellion | trust | trust | participation | participation | empowerment | empowerment

License

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17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT) 17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT)

Description

This subject, required of all first-year PhD students in political science, introduces fundamental ideas, theories, and methods in contemporary political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that are intrinsically good and have been influential in the field. The first semester focuses principally on issues of political theory and international relations, while the second focuses principally on American and comparative politics. Readings in the fall semester from Rawls, A Theory of Justice; Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty; Arrow Social Choice and Individual Values; Olson, The Logic of Collective Action; Waltz, Theory of International Relations; Bull, The Anarchical Society; Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Elster, Cement of Society; Keohane, After This subject, required of all first-year PhD students in political science, introduces fundamental ideas, theories, and methods in contemporary political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that are intrinsically good and have been influential in the field. The first semester focuses principally on issues of political theory and international relations, while the second focuses principally on American and comparative politics. Readings in the fall semester from Rawls, A Theory of Justice; Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty; Arrow Social Choice and Individual Values; Olson, The Logic of Collective Action; Waltz, Theory of International Relations; Bull, The Anarchical Society; Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Elster, Cement of Society; Keohane, After

Subjects

Political science | Political science | fundamental ideas | fundamental ideas | theories | theories | methods | methods | contemporary | contemporary | major books | major books | articles | articles | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | American | American | comparative politics | comparative politics | Rawls | Rawls | A Theory of Justice | A Theory of Justice | Hayek | Hayek | The Constitution of Liberty | The Constitution of Liberty | Arrow | Arrow | Social Choice and Individual Values | Social Choice and Individual Values | Olson | Olson | The Logic of Collective Action | The Logic of Collective Action | Waltz | Waltz | Theory of International Relations | Theory of International Relations | Bull | Bull | The Anarchical Society | The Anarchical Society | Foucault | Foucault | Discipline and Punish | Discipline and Punish | Elster | Elster | Cement of Society | Cement of Society | Keohane | Keohane | After Hegemony | After Hegemony | Allison | Allison | Zelikow | Zelikow | The Essence of Decision | The Essence of Decision | Doyle | Doyle | Kant | Kant | Liberal Legacies | Liberal Legacies | Foreign Affairs | Foreign Affairs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations. This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations.

Subjects

21st century | 21st century | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | realism | realism | liberalism | liberalism | institutionalism | institutionalism | constructivism | constructivism | conflict | conflict | war | war | globalization | globalization | critical analysis | critical analysis | theoretical assumptions | theoretical assumptions | analytical structures | analytical structures | comparative analysis | comparative analysis | neo-realism | neo-realism | neo-liberalism | neo-liberalism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | contentions | contentions | environmentalism | environmentalism | emergent dynamics | emergent dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | warfare | warfare | transformations | transformations | structures | structures | processes | processes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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