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14.123 Microeconomic Theory III (MIT) 14.123 Microeconomic Theory III (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course discusses decision theory and topics in game theory. We present models of individual decision-making under certainty and uncertainty. Topics include preference orderings, expected utility, risk, stochastic dominance, supermodularity, monotone comparative statics, background risk, game theory, rationalizability, iterated strict dominance multi-stage games, sequential equilibrium, trembling-hand perfection, stability, signaling games, theory of auctions, global games, repeated games, and correlation. This half-semester course discusses decision theory and topics in game theory. We present models of individual decision-making under certainty and uncertainty. Topics include preference orderings, expected utility, risk, stochastic dominance, supermodularity, monotone comparative statics, background risk, game theory, rationalizability, iterated strict dominance multi-stage games, sequential equilibrium, trembling-hand perfection, stability, signaling games, theory of auctions, global games, repeated games, and correlation.

Subjects

microeconomics | microeconomics | microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | preference | preference | utility representation | utility representation | expected utility | expected utility | positive interpretation | positive interpretation | normative interpretation | normative interpretation | risk | risk | stochastic dominance | stochastic dominance | insurance | insurance | finance | finance | supermodularity | supermodularity | comparative statics | comparative statics | decision theory | decision theory | game theory | game theory | rationalizability | rationalizability | iterated strict dominance | iterated strict dominance | iterated conditional dominance | iterated conditional dominance | bargaining | bargaining | equilibrium | equilibrium | sequential equilibrium | sequential equilibrium | trembling-hand perfection | trembling-hand perfection | signaling games | signaling games | auctions | auctions | global games | global games | repeated games | repeated games | correlation | correlation

License

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21L.451 Introduction to Literary Theory (MIT) 21L.451 Introduction to Literary Theory (MIT)

Description

This subject focuses on the ways in which we read, providing an overview of some of the different strategies of reading, comprehending and engaging with literary texts developed in the twentieth century. The course is organized around specific theoretical paradigms. In each case our task will be, first, to work through the selected reading in order to see how it determines or defines the task of literary interpretation; second, to locate the limits of each particular approach; and finally, to trace the emergence of subsequent theoretical paradigms as responses to the achievements and limitations of what came before. The literary texts and films that accompany the theoretical material will serve as concrete cases that allow us to see theory in action. In general, then, each week we wil This subject focuses on the ways in which we read, providing an overview of some of the different strategies of reading, comprehending and engaging with literary texts developed in the twentieth century. The course is organized around specific theoretical paradigms. In each case our task will be, first, to work through the selected reading in order to see how it determines or defines the task of literary interpretation; second, to locate the limits of each particular approach; and finally, to trace the emergence of subsequent theoretical paradigms as responses to the achievements and limitations of what came before. The literary texts and films that accompany the theoretical material will serve as concrete cases that allow us to see theory in action. In general, then, each week we wil

Subjects

strategies of reading | comprehending and engaging with literary texts developed in the twentieth century | strategies of reading | comprehending and engaging with literary texts developed in the twentieth century | theoretical paradigms | theoretical paradigms | literary interpretation | literary interpretation | interpretative approach | interpretative approach | film | film | literature | literature

License

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12.510 Introduction to Seismology (MIT) 12.510 Introduction to Seismology (MIT)

Description

This graduate level course presents a basic study in seismology and the utilization of seismic waves for the study of Earth's interior. It introduces techniques necessary for understanding of elastic wave propagation in layered media. This graduate level course presents a basic study in seismology and the utilization of seismic waves for the study of Earth's interior. It introduces techniques necessary for understanding of elastic wave propagation in layered media.

Subjects

seismology | seismology | utilization of seismic waves | utilization of seismic waves | Earth's interior | Earth's interior | elastic wave propagation in stratified media | elastic wave propagation in stratified media | synthetic seismograms | synthetic seismograms | WKBJ | WKBJ | mode summation | mode summation | Ray theory | Ray theory | interpretation of travel times | interpretation of travel times | surface wave dispersion in layered media | surface wave dispersion in layered media | Earth's free oscillations | Earth's free oscillations | seismicity | seismicity | earthquake locations | earthquake locations

License

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6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (MIT) 6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the principles of computation. Upon completion of 6.001, students should be able to explain and apply the basic methods from programming languages to analyze computational systems, and to generate computational solutions to abstract problems. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the course. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.Technical RequirementsScheme software is required to run the .scm files found on this course site. This course introduces students to the principles of computation. Upon completion of 6.001, students should be able to explain and apply the basic methods from programming languages to analyze computational systems, and to generate computational solutions to abstract problems. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the course. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.Technical RequirementsScheme software is required to run the .scm files found on this course site.

Subjects

programming | programming | Scheme | Scheme | abstraction | abstraction | recursion | recursion | iteration | iteration | object oriented | object oriented | structure | structure | interpretation | interpretation | computer programs | computer programs | languages | languages | procedures | procedures

License

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6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (MIT) 6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course introduces students to the principles of computation. Upon completion of 6.001, students should be able to explain and apply the basic methods from programming languages to analyze computational systems, and to generate computational solutions to abstract problems. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the course. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course introduces students to the principles of computation. Upon completion of 6.001, students should be able to explain and apply the basic methods from programming languages to analyze computational systems, and to generate computational solutions to abstract problems. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the course. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

programming | programming | Scheme | Scheme | abstraction | abstraction | recursion | recursion | iteration | iteration | object oriented | object oriented | structure | structure | interpretation | interpretation | computer programs | computer programs | languages | languages | procedures | procedures

License

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21L.432 Understanding Television (MIT) 21L.432 Understanding Television (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. The subtitle of this course for the spring 2003 term is "American Television: A Cultural History." The class takes a cultural approach to television's evolution as a technology and system of representation, considering television as a system of storytelling and myth-making, and as a cultural practice, studied from anthropological, literary, and cinematic perspectives. The course focuses on prime-time commercial broadcasting, the medium's technological and economic history, and theoretical perspectives. There is much required viewing as well as readings in media theory and cultural interpretation. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. The subtitle of this course for the spring 2003 term is "American Television: A Cultural History." The class takes a cultural approach to television's evolution as a technology and system of representation, considering television as a system of storytelling and myth-making, and as a cultural practice, studied from anthropological, literary, and cinematic perspectives. The course focuses on prime-time commercial broadcasting, the medium's technological and economic history, and theoretical perspectives. There is much required viewing as well as readings in media theory and cultural interpretation.

Subjects

systems of representation | systems of representation | storytelling | storytelling | myth | myth | cultural practice | cultural practice | anthropology | anthropology | literature | literature | cinematogaphy | cinematogaphy | prime-time | prime-time | commercial broadcasting | commercial broadcasting | media theory | media theory | cultural interpretation | cultural interpretation | CMS.915 | CMS.915

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1.017 Computing and Data Analysis for Environmental Applications (MIT) 1.017 Computing and Data Analysis for Environmental Applications (MIT)

Description

This subject is a computer-oriented introduction to probability and data analysis. It is designed to give students the knowledge and practical experience they need to interpret lab and field data. Basic probability concepts are introduced at the outset because they provide a systematic way to describe uncertainty. They form the basis for the analysis of quantitative data in science and engineering. The MATLAB® programming language is used to perform virtual experiments and to analyze real-world data sets, many downloaded from the web. Programming applications include display and assessment of data sets, investigation of hypotheses, and identification of possible casual relationships between variables. This is the first semester that two courses, Computing and Data Analysis for Environm This subject is a computer-oriented introduction to probability and data analysis. It is designed to give students the knowledge and practical experience they need to interpret lab and field data. Basic probability concepts are introduced at the outset because they provide a systematic way to describe uncertainty. They form the basis for the analysis of quantitative data in science and engineering. The MATLAB® programming language is used to perform virtual experiments and to analyze real-world data sets, many downloaded from the web. Programming applications include display and assessment of data sets, investigation of hypotheses, and identification of possible casual relationships between variables. This is the first semester that two courses, Computing and Data Analysis for Environm

Subjects

probability | probability | statistics | statistics | events | events | random variables | random variables | univariate distributions | univariate distributions | multivariate distributions | multivariate distributions | uncertainty propagation | uncertainty propagation | Bernoulli trials | Bernoulli trials | Poisson processed | Poisson processed | conditional probability | conditional probability | Bayes rule | Bayes rule | random sampling | random sampling | point estimation | point estimation | interval estimation | interval estimation | hypothesis testing | hypothesis testing | analysis of variance | analysis of variance | linear regression | linear regression | computational analysis | computational analysis | data analysis | data analysis | environmental engineering | environmental engineering | applications | applications | MATLAB | MATLAB | numerical modeling | numerical modeling | probabilistic concepts | probabilistic concepts | statistical methods | statistical methods | field data | field data | laboratory data | laboratory data | numerical techniques | numerical techniques | Monte Carlo simulation | Monte Carlo simulation | variability | variability | sampling | sampling | data sets | data sets | computer | computer | uncertainty | uncertainty | interpretation | interpretation | quantitative data | quantitative data

License

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6.945 Adventures in Advanced Symbolic Programming (MIT) 6.945 Adventures in Advanced Symbolic Programming (MIT)

Description

This course covers concepts and techniques for the design and implementation of large software systems that can be adapted to uses not anticipated by the designer. Applications include compilers, computer-algebra systems, deductive systems, and some artificial intelligence applications. Topics include combinators, generic operations, pattern matching, pattern-directed invocation, rule systems, backtracking, dependencies, indeterminacy, memoization, constraint propagation, and incremental refinement. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the subject. There will be extensive programming assignments, using MIT/GNU Scheme. Students should have significant programming experience in Scheme, Common Lisp, Haskell, CAML or some other "functional" language. This course covers concepts and techniques for the design and implementation of large software systems that can be adapted to uses not anticipated by the designer. Applications include compilers, computer-algebra systems, deductive systems, and some artificial intelligence applications. Topics include combinators, generic operations, pattern matching, pattern-directed invocation, rule systems, backtracking, dependencies, indeterminacy, memoization, constraint propagation, and incremental refinement. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the subject. There will be extensive programming assignments, using MIT/GNU Scheme. Students should have significant programming experience in Scheme, Common Lisp, Haskell, CAML or some other "functional" language.

Subjects

Scheme | Scheme | symbolic programming | symbolic programming | additive systems | additive systems | generic operations | generic operations | language layers | language layers | pattern-directed invocation | pattern-directed invocation | searching | searching | amb | amb | backtracking | backtracking | propagation systems | propagation systems | constraints | constraints | truth maintenance | truth maintenance | continuations | continuations | structure and interpretation of computer programs | structure and interpretation of computer programs

License

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6.883 Program Analysis (MIT) 6.883 Program Analysis (MIT)

Description

6.883 is a graduate seminar that investigates a variety of program analysis techniques that address software engineering tasks. Static analysis topics include abstract interpretation (dataflow), type systems, model checking, decision procedures (SAT, BDDs), theorem-proving. Dynamic analysis topics include testing, fault isolation (debugging), model inference, and visualization. While the course focuses on the design and implementation of programming tools, the material will be useful to anyone who wishes to improve his or her programming or understand the state of the art. Students are expected to read classic and current technical papers, actively participate in class discussion, perform small exercises that provide experience with a variety of tools, and complete a team research project. 6.883 is a graduate seminar that investigates a variety of program analysis techniques that address software engineering tasks. Static analysis topics include abstract interpretation (dataflow), type systems, model checking, decision procedures (SAT, BDDs), theorem-proving. Dynamic analysis topics include testing, fault isolation (debugging), model inference, and visualization. While the course focuses on the design and implementation of programming tools, the material will be useful to anyone who wishes to improve his or her programming or understand the state of the art. Students are expected to read classic and current technical papers, actively participate in class discussion, perform small exercises that provide experience with a variety of tools, and complete a team research project.

Subjects

program analysis | program analysis | static analysis | static analysis | abstract interpretation (dataflow) | abstract interpretation (dataflow) | type systems | type systems | model checking | model checking | decision procedures (SAT | decision procedures (SAT | BDDs) | BDDs) | theorem-proving | theorem-proving | dynamic analysis | dynamic analysis | testing | testing | fault isolation (debugging) | fault isolation (debugging) | model inference | and visualization | model inference | and visualization | decision procedures (SAT | BDDs) | decision procedures (SAT | BDDs)

License

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6.863J Natural Language and the Computer Representation of Knowledge (MIT) 6.863J Natural Language and the Computer Representation of Knowledge (MIT)

Description

6.863 is a laboratory-oriented course on the theory and practice of building computer systems for human language processing, with an emphasis on the linguistic, cognitive, and engineering foundations for understanding their design. 6.863 is a laboratory-oriented course on the theory and practice of building computer systems for human language processing, with an emphasis on the linguistic, cognitive, and engineering foundations for understanding their design.

Subjects

natural language processing | natural language processing | computational methods | computational methods | computer science | computer science | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | linguistic theory | linguistic theory | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | applications | applications | thematic structure | thematic structure | lexical-conceptual structure | lexical-conceptual structure | semantic structure | semantic structure | pragmatic structure | pragmatic structure | discourse structure | discourse structure | phonology | phonology | morphology | morphology | 2-level morphology | 2-level morphology | kimmo | kimmo | hmm tagging | hmm tagging | tagging | tagging | rule-based tagging | rule-based tagging | part of speech tagging | part of speech tagging | brill tagger | brill tagger | parsing | parsing | syntax | syntax | automata | automata | word modeling | word modeling | grammars | grammars | parsing algorithms | parsing algorithms | shift-reduce parsers | shift-reduce parsers | Earley's algorithm | Earley's algorithm | chart parsing | chart parsing | context-free parsing | context-free parsing | feature-based parsing | feature-based parsing | natural language system design | natural language system design | integrated lexicon | integrated lexicon | syntactic features | syntactic features | semantic interpretation | semantic interpretation | compositionality | compositionality | quantifiers | quantifiers | lexical semantic | lexical semantic | semantics | semantics | machine translation | machine translation | language learning | language learning | computational models of language | computational models of language | origins of language | origins of language | 6.863 | 6.863 | 9.611 | 9.611

License

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12.620J Classical Mechanics: A Computational Approach (MIT) 12.620J Classical Mechanics: A Computational Approach (MIT)

Description

We will study the fundamental principles of classical mechanics, with a modern emphasis on the qualitative structure of phase space. We will use computational ideas to formulate the principles of mechanics precisely. Expression in a computational framework encourages clear thinking and active exploration. We will consider the following topics: the Lagrangian formulation; action, variational principles, and equations of motion; Hamilton's principle; conserved quantities; rigid bodies and tops; Hamiltonian formulation and canonical equations; surfaces of section; chaos; canonical transformations and generating functions; Liouville's theorem and Poincaré integral invariants; Poincaré-Birkhoff and KAM theorems; invariant curves and cantori; nonlinear resonances; resonance overl We will study the fundamental principles of classical mechanics, with a modern emphasis on the qualitative structure of phase space. We will use computational ideas to formulate the principles of mechanics precisely. Expression in a computational framework encourages clear thinking and active exploration. We will consider the following topics: the Lagrangian formulation; action, variational principles, and equations of motion; Hamilton's principle; conserved quantities; rigid bodies and tops; Hamiltonian formulation and canonical equations; surfaces of section; chaos; canonical transformations and generating functions; Liouville's theorem and Poincaré integral invariants; Poincaré-Birkhoff and KAM theorems; invariant curves and cantori; nonlinear resonances; resonance overl

Subjects

classical mechanics | classical mechanics | computational classical mechanics | computational classical mechanics | structure and interpretation of classical mechanics | structure and interpretation of classical mechanics | phase space | phase space | lagrangian | lagrangian | action | action | variational principles | variational principles | equation of motion | equation of motion | hamilton principle | hamilton principle | rigid bodies | rigid bodies | Hamiltonian | Hamiltonian | canonical equations | canonical equations | surfaces of section | surfaces of section | canonical transformations | canonical transformations | liouville | liouville | Poincare | Poincare | birkhoff | birkhoff | kam theorem | kam theorem | invariant curves | invariant curves | resonance | resonance | chaos | chaos

License

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12.510 Introduction to Seismology (MIT) 12.510 Introduction to Seismology (MIT)

Description

This graduate level course presents a basic study in seismology and the utilization of seismic waves for the study of Earth's interior. It introduces techniques necessary for understanding of elastic wave propagation in layered media. This graduate level course presents a basic study in seismology and the utilization of seismic waves for the study of Earth's interior. It introduces techniques necessary for understanding of elastic wave propagation in layered media.

Subjects

seismology | seismology | utilization of seismic waves | utilization of seismic waves | Earth's interior | Earth's interior | elastic wave propagation in stratified media | elastic wave propagation in stratified media | synthetic seismograms | synthetic seismograms | WKBJ | WKBJ | mode summation | mode summation | Ray theory | Ray theory | interpretation of travel times | interpretation of travel times | surface wave dispersion in layered media | surface wave dispersion in layered media | Earth's free oscillations | Earth's free oscillations | seismicity | seismicity | earthquake locations | earthquake locations

License

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12.333 Atmospheric and Ocean Circulations (MIT) 12.333 Atmospheric and Ocean Circulations (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will look at many important aspects of the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean, from length scales of meters to thousands of km and time scales ranging from seconds to years. We will assume familiarity with concepts covered in course 12.003 (Physics of the Fluid Earth). In the early stages of the present course, we will make somewhat greater use of math than did 12.003, but the math we will use is no more than that encountered in elementary electromagnetic field theory, for example. The focus of the course is on the physics of the phenomena which we will discuss. In this course, we will look at many important aspects of the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean, from length scales of meters to thousands of km and time scales ranging from seconds to years. We will assume familiarity with concepts covered in course 12.003 (Physics of the Fluid Earth). In the early stages of the present course, we will make somewhat greater use of math than did 12.003, but the math we will use is no more than that encountered in elementary electromagnetic field theory, for example. The focus of the course is on the physics of the phenomena which we will discuss.

Subjects

atmospheric and oceanic phenomena | atmospheric and oceanic phenomena | observations | observations | theoretical interpretations | theoretical interpretations | monsoons | monsoons | El Ni?o | El Ni?o | planetary waves | planetary waves | atmospheric synoptic eddies and fronts | atmospheric synoptic eddies and fronts | gulf stream rings | gulf stream rings | hurricanes | hurricanes | surface and internal gravity waves | surface and internal gravity waves | tides | tides | shallow water gravity waves | shallow water gravity waves | deep water gravity waves | deep water gravity waves | internal gravity waves | internal gravity waves | large-scale motions | large-scale motions | rotating earth | rotating earth | Rossby waves | Rossby waves | planetary scale motions | planetary scale motions | baroclinic instability | baroclinic instability | midlatitude storms | midlatitude storms | equatorial atmosphere | equatorial atmosphere | equatorial ocean | equatorial ocean | southern oscillation | southern oscillation | tropical cyclones | tropical cyclones | typhoons | typhoons

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21A.260 Culture, Embodiment and the Senses (MIT) 21A.260 Culture, Embodiment and the Senses (MIT)

Description

Culture, Embodiment, and the Senses will provide an historical and cross-cultural analysis of the politics of sensory experience. The subject will address western philosophical debates about mind, brain, emotion, and the body and the historical value placed upon sight, reason, and rationality, versus smell, taste, and touch as acceptable modes of knowing and knowledge production. We will assess cultural traditions that challenge scientific interpretations of experience arising from western philosophical and physiological models. The class will examine how sensory experience lies beyond the realm of individual physiological or psychological responses and occurs within a culturally elaborated field of social relations. Finally, we will debate how discourse about the senses is a product of pa Culture, Embodiment, and the Senses will provide an historical and cross-cultural analysis of the politics of sensory experience. The subject will address western philosophical debates about mind, brain, emotion, and the body and the historical value placed upon sight, reason, and rationality, versus smell, taste, and touch as acceptable modes of knowing and knowledge production. We will assess cultural traditions that challenge scientific interpretations of experience arising from western philosophical and physiological models. The class will examine how sensory experience lies beyond the realm of individual physiological or psychological responses and occurs within a culturally elaborated field of social relations. Finally, we will debate how discourse about the senses is a product of pa

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | culture | culture | embodiment | embodiment | senses | senses | historical | historical | cross-cultural analysis | cross-cultural analysis | politics | politics | sensory experience | sensory experience | western philosophical debates | western philosophical debates | mind | mind | brain | brain | emotion | emotion | body | body | sight | sight | reason | reason | rationality | rationality | smell | smell | taste | taste | touch | touch | knowing | knowing | knowledge production | knowledge production | scientific interpretations | scientific interpretations | western philosophical | western philosophical | physiological models | physiological models | individual physiological | individual physiological | psychological responses | psychological responses | social relations | social relations | power relations | power relations

License

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21A.212 Myth, Ritual, and Symbolism (MIT) 21A.212 Myth, Ritual, and Symbolism (MIT)

Description

Human beings are symbol-making as well as tool-making animals. We understand our world and shape our lives in large part by assigning meanings to objects, beings, and persons; by connecting things together in symbolic patterns; and by creating elaborate forms of symbolic action and narrative. In this introductory subject we consider how symbols are created and structured; how they draw on and give meaning to different domains of the human world; how they are woven into politics, family life, and the life cycle; and how we can interpret them. The semester will be devoted to a number of topics in symbolism. Metaphor and Other Figurative Language The Raw Materials of Symbolism, especially Animals and The Human Body Cosmology and Complex Symbolic Systems Ritual, including Symbolic Curing Human beings are symbol-making as well as tool-making animals. We understand our world and shape our lives in large part by assigning meanings to objects, beings, and persons; by connecting things together in symbolic patterns; and by creating elaborate forms of symbolic action and narrative. In this introductory subject we consider how symbols are created and structured; how they draw on and give meaning to different domains of the human world; how they are woven into politics, family life, and the life cycle; and how we can interpret them. The semester will be devoted to a number of topics in symbolism. Metaphor and Other Figurative Language The Raw Materials of Symbolism, especially Animals and The Human Body Cosmology and Complex Symbolic Systems Ritual, including Symbolic Curing

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | myth | myth | ritual | ritual | symbolism | symbolism | animals | animals | symbolic system | symbolic system | meaning | meaning | life cycle | life cycle | metaphor | metaphor | figurative language | figurative language | human body | human body | cosmology | cosmology | magic | magic | narrative | narrative | mythology | mythology | patterns | patterns | culture | culture | sign | sign | tropes | tropes | classification | classification | interpretation | interpretation | folktale | folktale | power | power | passage | passage | persuasion | persuasion

License

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century. This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century.

Subjects

historical writing | historical writing | politics | politics | social | social | culture | culture | demographics | demographics | biography | biography | environment | environment | comparative literature | comparative literature | film | film | fiction | fiction | memoir | memoir | methodology | methodology | political | political | cultural | cultural | demographic | demographic | biographical | biographical | comparative | comparative | historical films | historical films | memoirs | memoirs | conventional history | conventional history | methods | methods | historians | historians | interpretation | interpretation | archives | archives | archivists | archivists | archival findings | archival findings | history | history | national identity | national identity | philosophy of history | philosophy of history

License

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003 Introduction to Fiction (MIT) 21L.003 Introduction to Fiction (MIT)

Description

This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles, traditional and innovative, western and non-western, and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms. This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles, traditional and innovative, western and non-western, and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms.

Subjects

Fiction | Fiction | Writing | Writing | Austen | Austen | Dickens | Dickens | Conrad | Conrad | Woolfe | Woolfe | Charters | Charters | literature | literature | novel | novel | narrative | narrative | verbal text | verbal text | culture | culture | prose narrative | prose narrative | short stories | short stories | short story | short story | critical analysis | critical analysis | literary response | literary response | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Charles Dickens | Charles Dickens | Joseph Conrad | Joseph Conrad | literary interpretation | literary interpretation | close analysis | close analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Interpreting Poetry (MIT) 21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Interpreting Poetry (MIT)

Description

This seminar offers a course of readings in lyric poetry. It aims to enhance the student's capacity to understand the nature of poetic language and the enjoyment of poetic texts by treating poems as messages to be deciphered. The seminar will briefly touch upon the history of theories of figurative language since Aristotle and it will attend to the development of those theories during the last thirty years, noting the manner in which they tended to consider figures of speech distinct from normative or literal expression, and it will devote particular attention to the rise of theories that quarrel with this distinction. The seminar also aims to communicate a rough sense of the history of English-speaking poetry since the early modern period. Some attention will be paid as well to the This seminar offers a course of readings in lyric poetry. It aims to enhance the student's capacity to understand the nature of poetic language and the enjoyment of poetic texts by treating poems as messages to be deciphered. The seminar will briefly touch upon the history of theories of figurative language since Aristotle and it will attend to the development of those theories during the last thirty years, noting the manner in which they tended to consider figures of speech distinct from normative or literal expression, and it will devote particular attention to the rise of theories that quarrel with this distinction. The seminar also aims to communicate a rough sense of the history of English-speaking poetry since the early modern period. Some attention will be paid as well to the

Subjects

literature | literature | lyric poetry | lyric poetry | poetic language | poetic language | figurative language | figurative language | Aristotle | Aristotle | literary theory | literary theory | history | history | early modern | early modern | metaphor | metaphor | science | science | renaissance | renaissance | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Donne | Donne | Marvell | Marvell | Milton | Milton | Romantic period | Romantic period | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Coleridge | Coleridge | Keats | Keats | early twentieth-century | early twentieth-century | Yeats | Yeats | T.S. Eliot | T.S. Eliot | Wallace Stevens | Wallace Stevens | Robert Frost | Robert Frost | Elizabeth Bishop | Elizabeth Bishop | Phillip Larkin | Phillip Larkin | poems | poems | normative | normative | literal | literal | literary criticism | literary criticism | critical method | critical method | interpretation | interpretation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Virginia Woolf's Shakespeare (MIT) 21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Virginia Woolf's Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

How does one writer use another writer's work? Does it matter if one author has been dead 300 years? What difference does it make if she's a groundbreaking twentieth-century feminist and the writer she values has come to epitomize the English literary tradition? How can a novelist borrow from plays and poems? By reading Virginia Woolf's major novels and essays in juxtaposition with some of the Shakespeare plays that (depending on one's interpretation) haunt, enrich, and/or shape her writing, we will try to answer these questions and raise others. Readings in literary criticism, women's studies, and other literary texts will complement our focus on the relationship--across time, media, and gender--between Shakespeare and Woolf. As a seminar, we will work to become more astute How does one writer use another writer's work? Does it matter if one author has been dead 300 years? What difference does it make if she's a groundbreaking twentieth-century feminist and the writer she values has come to epitomize the English literary tradition? How can a novelist borrow from plays and poems? By reading Virginia Woolf's major novels and essays in juxtaposition with some of the Shakespeare plays that (depending on one's interpretation) haunt, enrich, and/or shape her writing, we will try to answer these questions and raise others. Readings in literary criticism, women's studies, and other literary texts will complement our focus on the relationship--across time, media, and gender--between Shakespeare and Woolf. As a seminar, we will work to become more astute

Subjects

WGS.510 | WGS.510 | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | literary interpretation | literary interpretation | SP.430 | SP.430 | WMN.430 | WMN.430

License

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21M.710 Script Analysis (MIT) 21M.710 Script Analysis (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on reading a script theatrically with a view to mounting a coherent production. Through careful, intensive reading of a variety of plays from different periods and different aesthetics, a pattern emerges for discerning what options exist for interpretating a script. The Fall 2005 version of this course contains alternate readings and assignments sections. This course focuses on reading a script theatrically with a view to mounting a coherent production. Through careful, intensive reading of a variety of plays from different periods and different aesthetics, a pattern emerges for discerning what options exist for interpretating a script. The Fall 2005 version of this course contains alternate readings and assignments sections.

Subjects

script analysis | script analysis | dramatic interpretation | dramatic interpretation | theater | theater | plays | plays | dramatic analysis | dramatic analysis | theatrical production | theatrical production | script | script | dialog | dialog | conflict | conflict | character | character | historical context | historical context | plot | plot | setting | setting | scene | scene | directing | directing | staging | staging | design | design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.710 Script Analysis (MIT) 21M.710 Script Analysis (MIT)

Description

This class focuses on reading a script theatrically with a view to mounting a coherent production. Through careful, intensive reading of a variety of plays from different periods and different aesthetics, a pattern emerges for discerning what options exist for interpretating a script. Students discuss the consequences of those options for production. This class focuses on reading a script theatrically with a view to mounting a coherent production. Through careful, intensive reading of a variety of plays from different periods and different aesthetics, a pattern emerges for discerning what options exist for interpretating a script. Students discuss the consequences of those options for production.

Subjects

script analysis | script analysis | dramatic interpretation | dramatic interpretation | theater | theater | plays | plays | dramatic analysis | dramatic analysis | theatrical production | theatrical production | script | script | dialog | dialog | conflict | conflict | character | character | historical context | historical context | plot | plot | setting | setting | scene | scene | directing | directing | staging | staging | design | design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.729 Topics in Philosophy of Language: Modeling Representation (MIT) 24.729 Topics in Philosophy of Language: Modeling Representation (MIT)

Description

The seminar will be devoted to understanding what we're up to when we ascribe contents to a person's assertions and mental attitudes. We seek to make clear the rules of the game for the philosophy of language. We'll survey classic discussions of the issue by Field, Lewis and Stalnaker. But much of the emphasis of the class will be on getting clear about the limitations of our theoretical tools. I'd like to focus on places where our theorizing runs into trouble, or breaks down altogether. The seminar will be devoted to understanding what we're up to when we ascribe contents to a person's assertions and mental attitudes. We seek to make clear the rules of the game for the philosophy of language. We'll survey classic discussions of the issue by Field, Lewis and Stalnaker. But much of the emphasis of the class will be on getting clear about the limitations of our theoretical tools. I'd like to focus on places where our theorizing runs into trouble, or breaks down altogether.

Subjects

radical interpretation | radical interpretation | mathematical truth | mathematical truth | self-location | self-location | degrees of belief | degrees of belief | incoherent belief | incoherent belief | language of thought | language of thought | representation system | representation system | modeling representation | modeling representation | intentionality | intentionality | philosophy of language | philosophy of language | Putnam's paradox | Putnam's paradox | semantics | semantics | logical omniscience | logical omniscience | epistemology | epistemology | knowledge argument | knowledge argument

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.360 Ethnography (MIT) STS.360 Ethnography (MIT)

Description

This course is a practicum-style seminar in anthropological methods of ethnographic fieldwork and writing. Depending on student experience in ethnographic reading and practice, the course is a mix of reading anthropological and science studies ethnographies; and formulating and pursuing ethnographic work in local labs, companies, or other sites. This course is a practicum-style seminar in anthropological methods of ethnographic fieldwork and writing. Depending on student experience in ethnographic reading and practice, the course is a mix of reading anthropological and science studies ethnographies; and formulating and pursuing ethnographic work in local labs, companies, or other sites.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | fieldwork | fieldwork | oral history | oral history | ethnomethodology | ethnomethodology | advertising | advertising | knowledge communities | knowledge communities | interviewing | interviewing | restudies | restudies | practicum | practicum | anthropological methods | anthropological methods | ethnographic fieldwork | ethnographic fieldwork | ethnographic writing | ethnographic writing | ethnographic reading | ethnographic reading | ethnographic practice | ethnographic practice | anthropological studies | anthropological studies | science studies | science studies | ethnographies | ethnographies | labs | labs | companies | companies | sites | sites | advocacy | advocacy | critique | critique | transference | transference | countertransference | countertransference | translation | translation | data | data | models | models | explanations | explanations | hypotheses | hypotheses | generalizations | generalizations | interpretations | interpretations | ethnography | ethnography

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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