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11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons

Subjects

why cities become torn | why cities become torn | ethnic | ethnic | religious | religious | racial | racial | nationalist | nationalist | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | violence | violence | inequality | inequality | social injustice | social injustice | solutions | solutions | social and political theories of the city and the nation | social and political theories of the city and the nation | territorial levels of determination | territorial levels of determination | regional or transnational | regional or transnational | policymaking | policymaking | democratic participation | democratic participation | citizenship | citizenship | spatial | spatial | infrastructural | infrastructural | technological interventions | technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | democracy | democracy | democratic | democratic | territory | territory | territorial | territorial | participation | participation | policy | policy | theoretical | theoretical | practical | practical | identity | identity | conflict | conflict | social | social | political | political | theories | theories | regional | regional | transnational | transnational | levels of determination | levels of determination | institutional | institutional | technological | technological | interventions | interventions | city | city | difference | difference | diversity | diversity | equality | equality | class | class | cities | cities | nations | nations | legal | legal | jurisdiction | jurisdiction | peace | peace | cosmopolitan | cosmopolitan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons

Subjects

why cities become torn | ethnic | religious | racial | nationalist | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | violence | inequality | social injustice | solutions | social and political theories of the city and the nation | territorial levels of determination | regional or transnational | policymaking | democratic participation | citizenship | spatial | infrastructural | technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | democracy | democratic | territory | territorial | participation | policy | theoretical | practical | identity | conflict | social | political | theories | regional | transnational | levels of determination | institutional | technological | interventions | city | difference | diversity | equality | class | cities | nations | legal | jurisdiction | peace | cosmopolitan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT) 4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | artists | artists | architects | architects | collaboration | collaboration | translation | translation | revitalization | revitalization | urban space | urban space | redistricting | redistricting | planned cities | planned cities | development | development | ground zero | ground zero | blank slate | blank slate | interventions | interventions | visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | aesthetic analyses | modern art | modern art | art history | art history | body | body | phenomenology | phenomenology | personal space | personal space | installation | installation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges. This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | market | optimization | optimization | allocation | allocation | economic measurement | economic measurement | analysis | analysis | microeconomics | microeconomics | demand | demand | supply | supply | equilibrium | equilibrium | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | consumer preference | consumer preference | utility functions | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | budget constraints | interior solutions | interior solutions | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | Engle curves | individual demand | individual demand | market demand | market demand | revealed preferences | revealed preferences | substitution effect | substitution effect | income effect | income effect | Giffen goods | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | Irish potato famine | network externalities | network externalities | uncertainty | uncertainty | preference toward risk | preference toward risk | risk premium | risk premium | indifference curves | indifference curves | diversification | diversification | insurance | insurance | producer theory | producer theory | production functions | production functions | short run | short run | long run | long run | returns to scale | returns to scale | cost functions | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scale | economies of scope | economies of scope | learning | learning | profit maximization | profit maximization | producer surplus | producer surplus | agricultural price support | agricultural price support | tax | tax | subsidy | subsidy | exchange economy | exchange economy | contract curves | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | efficiency | monopoly | monopoly | multiplant firm | multiplant firm | social cost | social cost | price regulation | price regulation | monopsony | monopsony | price discrimination | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | two-part tariffs | bundling | bundling | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | game theory | game theory | oligopoly | oligopoly | Cournot | Cournot | Stackelberg | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT) 17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT)

Description

Course mission: to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies.The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict and prescribe f Course mission: to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies.The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict and prescribe f

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | American Foreign Policy | wars | wars | interventions | interventions | Cold War | Cold War | Korean War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | CIA | Iran | Iran | Guatemala | Guatemala | Iraq | Iraq | Afghanistan | Afghanistan | China | China | human rights | human rights | environment | environment | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | military policy | military policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.131 Architectural Design, Level II: Material Essence: The Glass House (MIT) 4.131 Architectural Design, Level II: Material Essence: The Glass House (MIT)

Description

The theme that unites the Level II studios in the fall semester is a focus upon the 'making of architecture and built form' as a tectonic, technical and materially driven endeavor. It is a design investigation that is rooted in a larger culture of materiality and the associated phenomena, but a study of the language and production of built form as an integrated response to the conceptual proposition of the project. The studio will look to works of architecture where the material tectonic and its resultant technology or fabrication become instrumental to the realization of the ideas, in whatever form they may take. This becomes the 'art of technology' -- suggesting a level of innovation and creative manipulation as part of the design process to transform material into a composition of b The theme that unites the Level II studios in the fall semester is a focus upon the 'making of architecture and built form' as a tectonic, technical and materially driven endeavor. It is a design investigation that is rooted in a larger culture of materiality and the associated phenomena, but a study of the language and production of built form as an integrated response to the conceptual proposition of the project. The studio will look to works of architecture where the material tectonic and its resultant technology or fabrication become instrumental to the realization of the ideas, in whatever form they may take. This becomes the 'art of technology' -- suggesting a level of innovation and creative manipulation as part of the design process to transform material into a composition of b

Subjects

architecture | architecture | tectonics | tectonics | materials | materials | relationships | relationships | interventions | interventions | physics | physics | place and space | place and space | wellesley campus | wellesley campus | thomson island | thomson island | glass | glass | structures | structures | advanced design | advanced design | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | environmental control | environmental control | "art of technology" | "art of technology" | fabrication | fabrication | design from detailing | design from detailing | built form | built form | technical | technical | design investigation | design investigation | materiality | materiality | art of technology | art of technology | glasshouse | glasshouse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT) 4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT)

Description

In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | artists | artists | architects | architects | collaboration | collaboration | translation | translation | revitalization | revitalization | urban space | urban space | redistricting | redistricting | planned cities | planned cities | development | development | ground zero | ground zero | blank slate | blank slate | interventions | interventions | architecture | architecture | visual artists | visual artists | production models | production models | design process | design process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.401 Introduction to Housing, Community and Economic Development (MIT) 11.401 Introduction to Housing, Community and Economic Development (MIT)

Description

This class explores how public policy and private markets affect housing, economic development, and the local economy. It provides an overview of techniques and specified programs, policies, and strategies that are (and have been) directed at neighborhood development. It gives students an opportunity to reflect on their personal sense of the housing and community development process. And it emphasizes the institutional context within which public and private actions are undertaken. This class explores how public policy and private markets affect housing, economic development, and the local economy. It provides an overview of techniques and specified programs, policies, and strategies that are (and have been) directed at neighborhood development. It gives students an opportunity to reflect on their personal sense of the housing and community development process. And it emphasizes the institutional context within which public and private actions are undertaken.

Subjects

public policy | public policy | private markets | private markets | housing | housing | economic development | economic development | the local economy | the local economy | neighborhood institutions | neighborhood institutions | public and private interventions | public and private interventions | housing and community development agendas | housing and community development agendas | inner city and low income neighborhoods | inner city and low income neighborhoods | poverty | poverty | development | development | urban growth | urban growth | initiatives | initiatives | planning | planning | urban youth | urban youth | education | education

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.401 Introduction to Housing, Community, and Economic Development (MIT) 11.401 Introduction to Housing, Community, and Economic Development (MIT)

Description

This course provides students with a critical introduction to: social and economic inequality in America; equitable development as a response framework for planners; social capital and community building as planning concepts; and the history, development, and current prospects of the fields of housing (with an emphasis on affordability and inclusion) and local economic development. This course provides students with a critical introduction to: social and economic inequality in America; equitable development as a response framework for planners; social capital and community building as planning concepts; and the history, development, and current prospects of the fields of housing (with an emphasis on affordability and inclusion) and local economic development.

Subjects

public policy | public policy | private markets | private markets | housing | housing | economic development | economic development | the local economy | the local economy | neighborhood institutions | neighborhood institutions | public and private interventions | public and private interventions | housing and community development agendas | housing and community development agendas | inner city and low income neighborhoods | inner city and low income neighborhoods | poverty | poverty | development | development | urban growth | urban growth | initiatives | initiatives | planning | planning | urban youth | urban youth | education | education

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.401 Introduction to Housing, Community and Economic Development (MIT) 11.401 Introduction to Housing, Community and Economic Development (MIT)

Description

As an introduction to the field of Housing, Community, and Economic Development (HCED), the course is structured to: Advance student's understanding of how public policy and private markets affect housing, economic development, the local economy, and neighborhood institutions; Provide an overview of techniques for framing public and private interventions to meet housing and community development agendas, broadly defined, of inner city and low income neighborhoods; Review and critique specific programs, policies and strategies that are (and have been) directed at local development and neighborhood regeneration issues; Give students an opportunity to reflect on their personal sense of the "housing, community, and economic development" process and the various roles that planner As an introduction to the field of Housing, Community, and Economic Development (HCED), the course is structured to: Advance student's understanding of how public policy and private markets affect housing, economic development, the local economy, and neighborhood institutions; Provide an overview of techniques for framing public and private interventions to meet housing and community development agendas, broadly defined, of inner city and low income neighborhoods; Review and critique specific programs, policies and strategies that are (and have been) directed at local development and neighborhood regeneration issues; Give students an opportunity to reflect on their personal sense of the "housing, community, and economic development" process and the various roles that planner

Subjects

Public policy | Public policy | Private markets | Private markets | Housing | Housing | Economic development | Economic development | The local economy | The local economy | Neighborhood institutions | Neighborhood institutions | Public and private interventions | Public and private interventions | Housing and community development agendas | Housing and community development agendas | Inner city and low income neighborhoods | Inner city and low income neighborhoods | local economies | local economies | low income neighborhoods | low income neighborhoods | community development | community development | urban neighborhoods | urban neighborhoods | community organization | community organization | small business development | small business development | welfare | welfare | work | work | job training | job training | capital | capital | crime | crime | security | security | education | education | faith-based organizations | faith-based organizations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Egleston Square, Boston (MIT) Egleston Square, Boston (MIT)

Description

Revitalizing Urban Main Streets focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers three broad areas: an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed; the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives; and the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization. The course has dual goals: to explore the integration of economic and physical development interventions in ways that reinforce commercial district revitalization effor Revitalizing Urban Main Streets focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers three broad areas: an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed; the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives; and the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization. The course has dual goals: to explore the integration of economic and physical development interventions in ways that reinforce commercial district revitalization effor

Subjects

Urban business district decline | Urban business district decline | revitalization challenges | revitalization challenges | planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets | planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets | physical design and economic development perspectives | physical design and economic development perspectives | policies | policies | interventions | interventions | investments | investments | urban commercial revitalization | urban commercial revitalization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, Future (MIT) 17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, Future (MIT)

Description

This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad? This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad?

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | American Foreign Policy | wars | wars | interventions | interventions | Cold War | Cold War | Korean War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | CIA | Iran | Iran | Guatemala | Guatemala | Iraq | Iraq | Afghanistan | Afghanistan | China | China | human rights | human rights | environment | environment | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | military policy | military policy | WWI | WWI | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.951J Medical Decision Support (MIT) HST.951J Medical Decision Support (MIT)

Description

This course presents the main concepts of decision analysis, artificial intelligence, and predictive model construction and evaluation in the specific context of medical applications. The advantages and disadvantages of using these methods in real-world systems are emphasized, while students gain hands-on experience with application specific methods. The technical focus of the course includes decision analysis, knowledge-based systems (qualitative and quantitative), learning systems (including logistic regression, classification trees, neural networks), and techniques to evaluate the performance of such systems. This course presents the main concepts of decision analysis, artificial intelligence, and predictive model construction and evaluation in the specific context of medical applications. The advantages and disadvantages of using these methods in real-world systems are emphasized, while students gain hands-on experience with application specific methods. The technical focus of the course includes decision analysis, knowledge-based systems (qualitative and quantitative), learning systems (including logistic regression, classification trees, neural networks), and techniques to evaluate the performance of such systems.

Subjects

HST.951 | HST.951 | 6.873 | 6.873 | decision analysis | decision analysis | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | predictive model construction | predictive model construction | evaluation | evaluation | medical software | medical software | decision support | decision support | knowledge-based systems | knowledge-based systems | learning systems | learning systems | logistic regression | logistic regression | classification trees | classification trees | neural networks | neural networks | rough sets | rough sets | computer-based diagnosis | computer-based diagnosis | planning monitoring | planning monitoring | therapeutic interventions | therapeutic interventions | machine learning methods | machine learning methods

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. At MIT, this course was team taught by Prof. Robert Townsend, who taught for the first half of the semester, and Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, who taught during the second half. On OCW we are only including materials associated with sessions one through 13, which comprise the first half of the class. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. At MIT, this course was team taught by Prof. Robert Townsend, who taught for the first half of the semester, and Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, who taught during the second half. On OCW we are only including materials associated with sessions one through 13, which comprise the first half of the class.

Subjects

development economics | development economics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | aggregative growth theory | aggregative growth theory | returns to human capital | returns to human capital | population theory | population theory | technology | technology | returns to capital | returns to capital | non-aggregative growth models | non-aggregative growth models | finance | finance | property rights | property rights | trade | trade | reputation | reputation | history | history | culture | culture | political science | political science | environment | environment | emerging market economies | emerging market economies | measurement frameworks | measurement frameworks | neo-Classical standards | neo-Classical standards | interventions | interventions | mechanism design | mechanism design | applied general equilibrium development economics | applied general equilibrium development economics | supply-side | supply-side

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.951J Medical Decision Support (MIT) HST.951J Medical Decision Support (MIT)

Description

This course presents the main concepts of decision analysis, artificial intelligence and predictive model construction and evaluation in the specific context of medical applications. It emphasizes the advantages and disadvantages of using these methods in real-world systems and provides hands-on experience. Its technical focus is on decision support, knowledge-based systems (qualitative and quantitative), learning systems (including logistic regression, classification trees, neural networks, rough sets), and techniques to evaluate the performance of such systems. It reviews computer-based diagnosis, planning and monitoring of therapeutic interventions. It also discusses implemented medical applications and the software tools used in their construction. Students produce a final project usin This course presents the main concepts of decision analysis, artificial intelligence and predictive model construction and evaluation in the specific context of medical applications. It emphasizes the advantages and disadvantages of using these methods in real-world systems and provides hands-on experience. Its technical focus is on decision support, knowledge-based systems (qualitative and quantitative), learning systems (including logistic regression, classification trees, neural networks, rough sets), and techniques to evaluate the performance of such systems. It reviews computer-based diagnosis, planning and monitoring of therapeutic interventions. It also discusses implemented medical applications and the software tools used in their construction. Students produce a final project usin

Subjects

decision analysis | decision analysis | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | predictive model construction | predictive model construction | evaluation | evaluation | medical software | medical software | decision support | decision support | knowledge-based systems | knowledge-based systems | learning systems | learning systems | logistic regression | logistic regression | classification trees | classification trees | neural networks | neural networks | rough sets | rough sets | computer-based diagnosis | computer-based diagnosis | planning monitoring | planning monitoring | therapeutic interventions | therapeutic interventions | machine learning methods | machine learning methods | HST.951 | HST.951 | 6.873 | 6.873

License

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14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and, banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. This course contributes to the fulfillment of requirements for the Development field for Economics Ph.D. students at both Harvard and MIT. This course is jointly taught by Harvard and MIT instructors. The Harvard course is Economics 2390c Development Economics II: Macroeconomic Issues. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and, banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. This course contributes to the fulfillment of requirements for the Development field for Economics Ph.D. students at both Harvard and MIT. This course is jointly taught by Harvard and MIT instructors. The Harvard course is Economics 2390c Development Economics II: Macroeconomic Issues.

Subjects

development economics | development economics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | aggregative growth theory | aggregative growth theory | returns to human capital | returns to human capital | population theory | population theory | technology | technology | returns to capital | returns to capital | non-aggregative growth models | non-aggregative growth models | finance | finance | property rights | property rights | trade | trade | reputation | reputation | history | history | culture | culture | political science | political science | enviroment | enviroment | emerging market economies | emerging market economies | measurement frameworks | measurement frameworks | neo-Classical standards | neo-Classical standards | interventions | interventions | mechanism design | mechanism design | applied general equilibrium development economics | applied general equilibrium development economics | supply-side | supply-side

License

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT) 17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT)

Description

The mission for this course is to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies. The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict The mission for this course is to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies. The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | American Foreign Policy | wars | wars | interventions | interventions | Cold War | Cold War | Korean War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | CIA | Iran | Iran | Guatemala | Guatemala | Iraq | Iraq | Afghanistan | Afghanistan | China | China | human rights | human rights | environment | environment | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | military policy | military policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | optimization | allocation | economic measurement | analysis | microeconomics | demand | supply | equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer preference | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | interior solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | individual demand | market demand | revealed preferences | substitution effect | income effect | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | network externalities | uncertainty | preference toward risk | risk premium | indifference curves | diversification | insurance | producer theory | production functions | short run | long run | returns to scale | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scope | learning | profit maximization | producer surplus | agricultural price support | tax | subsidy | exchange economy | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | monopoly | multiplant firm | social cost | price regulation | monopsony | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | bundling | monopolistic competition | game theory | oligopoly | Cournot | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

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11.401 Introduction to Housing, Community and Economic Development (MIT)

Description

This class explores how public policy and private markets affect housing, economic development, and the local economy. It provides an overview of techniques and specified programs, policies, and strategies that are (and have been) directed at neighborhood development. It gives students an opportunity to reflect on their personal sense of the housing and community development process. And it emphasizes the institutional context within which public and private actions are undertaken.

Subjects

public policy | private markets | housing | economic development | the local economy | neighborhood institutions | public and private interventions | housing and community development agendas | inner city and low income neighborhoods | poverty | development | urban growth | initiatives | planning | urban youth | education

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Consolidated Report of DEISA Case Studies

Description

Authors:  Melissa Steyn, Claire Kelly DEISA (Diversity and Equity Interventions in South Africa) was a research programme which studied the transformation “industry” in South Africa, exploring issues such as the kinds of interventions Clicked 55 times. Last clicked 06/03/2014 - 11:06. Teaching & Learning Context:  The content of this report has been used as part of the Diversity Studies MPhil Programme. Specifically, it has been used for the course "Diversity Implementation and Practice", a course which introduces students to the strategies used, and challenges faced by, diversity pract

Subjects

Intercultural and Diversity Studies | Humanities | Downloadable Documents | Readings | English | Post-secondary | diversity | Diversity interventions | Human Resource Management | Transformation

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/za/

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14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and, banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. This course contributes to the fulfillment of requirements for the Development field for Economics Ph.D. students at both Harvard and MIT. This course is jointly taught by Harvard and MIT instructors. The Harvard course is Economics 2390c Development Economics II: Macroeconomic Issues.

Subjects

development economics | macroeconomics | aggregative growth theory | returns to human capital | population theory | technology | returns to capital | non-aggregative growth models | finance | property rights | trade | reputation | history | culture | political science | enviroment | emerging market economies | measurement frameworks | neo-Classical standards | interventions | mechanism design | applied general equilibrium development economics | supply-side

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.401 Introduction to Housing, Community and Economic Development (MIT)

Description

As an introduction to the field of Housing, Community, and Economic Development (HCED), the course is structured to: Advance student's understanding of how public policy and private markets affect housing, economic development, the local economy, and neighborhood institutions; Provide an overview of techniques for framing public and private interventions to meet housing and community development agendas, broadly defined, of inner city and low income neighborhoods; Review and critique specific programs, policies and strategies that are (and have been) directed at local development and neighborhood regeneration issues; Give students an opportunity to reflect on their personal sense of the "housing, community, and economic development" process and the various roles that planner

Subjects

Public policy | Private markets | Housing | Economic development | The local economy | Neighborhood institutions | Public and private interventions | Housing and community development agendas | Inner city and low income neighborhoods | local economies | low income neighborhoods | community development | urban neighborhoods | community organization | small business development | welfare | work | job training | capital | crime | security | education | faith-based organizations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Egleston Square, Boston (MIT)

Description

Revitalizing Urban Main Streets focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers three broad areas: an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed; the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives; and the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization. The course has dual goals: to explore the integration of economic and physical development interventions in ways that reinforce commercial district revitalization effor

Subjects

Urban business district decline | revitalization challenges | planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets | physical design and economic development perspectives | policies | interventions | investments | urban commercial revitalization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT)

Description

How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual construction based on the concept of defining a personal

Subjects

cities | urbanism | artists | architects | collaboration | translation | revitalization | urban space | redistricting | planned cities | development | ground zero | blank slate | interventions | visual art practice | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | installations | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | field trips | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | modern art | art history | body | phenomenology | personal space | installation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT)

Description

The mission for this course is to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies. The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | wars | interventions | Cold War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | Iran | Guatemala | Iraq | Afghanistan | China | human rights | environment | foreign economic policy | military policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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