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IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings

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2.29 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (13.024) (MIT) 2.29 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (13.024) (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.024. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.024. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department

Subjects

numerical methods | numerical methods | interpolation | interpolation | differentiation | differentiation | integration | integration | systems of linear equations | systems of linear equations | differential equations | differential equations | numerical integration | numerical integration | partial differential | partial differential | boundary integral equation panel methods | boundary integral equation panel methods | deterministic and random sea waves | deterministic and random sea waves | Fast Fourier Transforms | Fast Fourier Transforms | finite difference methods | finite difference methods | Integral boundary layer equations | Integral boundary layer equations | numerical lifting surface computations | numerical lifting surface computations | Numerical representation | Numerical representation | numerical solutions | numerical solutions | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | incompressible fluid mechanics | incompressible fluid mechanics | calculus | calculus | complex numbers | complex numbers | root finding | root finding | curve fitting | curve fitting | numerical differentiation | numerical differentiation | numerical errors | numerical errors | panel methods | panel methods | oscillating rigid objects | oscillating rigid objects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT) 2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua, the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows, similarity and dimensional analysis, lubrication theory, boundary layers and separation, circulation and vorticity theorems, potential flow, an introduction to turbulence, lift and drag, surface tension and surface tension driven flows. The class assumes students have had one prior undergraduate class in the area of fluid mechanics. Emphasis is placed on being able to formulate and solve typical problems of engineering importance. This course surveys the principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua, the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows, similarity and dimensional analysis, lubrication theory, boundary layers and separation, circulation and vorticity theorems, potential flow, an introduction to turbulence, lift and drag, surface tension and surface tension driven flows. The class assumes students have had one prior undergraduate class in the area of fluid mechanics. Emphasis is placed on being able to formulate and solve typical problems of engineering importance.

Subjects

fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | Mass conservation | Mass conservation | Navier-Stokes equation | Navier-Stokes equation | viscous flows | viscous flows | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | Lubrication theory | Lubrication theory | boundary layer | boundary layer | lift | lift | drag | drag | vorticity theorems | vorticity theorems | Potential flow | Potential flow | turbulence | turbulence | Bernoulli equation | Bernoulli equation | potenial flow | potenial flow | inviscid flow | inviscid flow | flight | flight | surface tension | surface tension

License

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IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings | 16.01 | 16.01 | 16.02 | 16.02 | 16.03 | 16.03 | 16.04 | 16.04

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2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT) 2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course is a survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua; Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows; similarity and dimensional analysis; lubrication theory; boundary layers and separation; circulation and vorticity theorems; potential flow; introduction to turbulence; lift and drag; surface tension and surface tension driven flows. This course is a survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua; Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows; similarity and dimensional analysis; lubrication theory; boundary layers and separation; circulation and vorticity theorems; potential flow; introduction to turbulence; lift and drag; surface tension and surface tension driven flows.

Subjects

fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | Mass conservation | Mass conservation | Navier-Stokes equation | Navier-Stokes equation | viscous flows | viscous flows | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | Lubrication theory | Lubrication theory | boundary layer | boundary layer | lift | lift | drag | drag | vorticity theorems | vorticity theorems | Potential flow | Potential flow | turbulence | turbulence | Bernoulli equation | Bernoulli equation | potenial flow | potenial flow | inviscid flow | inviscid flow | flight | flight | surface tension | surface tension

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.330J Fields, Forces and Flows in Biological Systems (MIT) 20.330J Fields, Forces and Flows in Biological Systems (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the basic driving forces for electric current, fluid flow, and mass transport, plus their application to a variety of biological systems. Basic mathematical and engineering tools will be introduced, in the context of biology and physiology. Various electrokinetic phenomena are also considered as an example of coupled nature of chemical-electro-mechanical driving forces. Applications include transport in biological tissues and across membranes, manipulation of cells and biomolecules, and microfluidics. This course introduces the basic driving forces for electric current, fluid flow, and mass transport, plus their application to a variety of biological systems. Basic mathematical and engineering tools will be introduced, in the context of biology and physiology. Various electrokinetic phenomena are also considered as an example of coupled nature of chemical-electro-mechanical driving forces. Applications include transport in biological tissues and across membranes, manipulation of cells and biomolecules, and microfluidics.

Subjects

hydrodynamic flow | hydrodynamic flow | electroosmosis | electroosmosis | diffusion | diffusion | electrophoresis | electrophoresis | reaction | reaction | membrane | membrane | cell | cell | biomolecule | biomolecule | microfluidics | microfluidics | ion transport | ion transport | electrokinetics | electrokinetics | Debye layer | Debye layer | Zeta potential | Zeta potential | inviscid flow | inviscid flow | viscous flow | viscous flow | tissue | tissue | organ | organ | biology | biology | molecular biology | molecular biology | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | electro-quasistatics | electro-quasistatics | Van der Waals | Van der Waals | bioMEMS | bioMEMS

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.100 Aerodynamics (MIT) 16.100 Aerodynamics (MIT)

Description

This course extends fluid mechanic concepts from Unified Engineering to the aerodynamic performance of wings and bodies in sub/supersonic regimes. 16.100 generally has four components: subsonic potential flows, including source/vortex panel methods; viscous flows, including laminar and turbulent boundary layers; aerodynamics of airfoils and wings, including thin airfoil theory, lifting line theory, and panel method/interacting boundary layer methods; and supersonic and hypersonic airfoil theory. Course material varies each year depending upon the focus of the design problem. Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .tar files found on this course site. MATLAB&#1 This course extends fluid mechanic concepts from Unified Engineering to the aerodynamic performance of wings and bodies in sub/supersonic regimes. 16.100 generally has four components: subsonic potential flows, including source/vortex panel methods; viscous flows, including laminar and turbulent boundary layers; aerodynamics of airfoils and wings, including thin airfoil theory, lifting line theory, and panel method/interacting boundary layer methods; and supersonic and hypersonic airfoil theory. Course material varies each year depending upon the focus of the design problem. Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .tar files found on this course site. MATLAB&#1

Subjects

aerodynamics | aerodynamics | airflow | airflow | air | air | body | body | aircraft | aircraft | aerodynamic modes | aerodynamic modes | aero | aero | forces | forces | flow | flow | computational | computational | CFD | CFD | aerodynamic analysis | aerodynamic analysis | lift | lift | drag | drag | potential flows | potential flows | imcompressible | imcompressible | supersonic | supersonic | subsonic | subsonic | panel method | panel method | vortex lattice method | vortex lattice method | boudary layer | boudary layer | transition | transition | turbulence | turbulence | inviscid | inviscid | viscous | viscous | euler | euler | navier-stokes | navier-stokes | wind tunnel | wind tunnel | flow similarity | flow similarity | non-dimensional | non-dimensional | mach number | mach number | reynolds number | reynolds number | integral momentum | integral momentum | airfoil | airfoil | wing | wing | stall | stall | friction drag | friction drag | induced drag | induced drag | wave drag | wave drag | pressure drag | pressure drag | fluid element | fluid element | shear strain | shear strain | normal strain | normal strain | vorticity | vorticity | divergence | divergence | substantial derviative | substantial derviative | laminar | laminar | displacement thickness | displacement thickness | momentum thickness | momentum thickness | skin friction | skin friction | separation | separation | velocity profile | velocity profile | 2-d panel | 2-d panel | 3-d vortex | 3-d vortex | thin airfoil | thin airfoil | lifting line | lifting line | aspect ratio | aspect ratio | twist | twist | camber | camber | wing loading | wing loading | roll moments | roll moments | finite volume approximation | finite volume approximation | shocks | shocks | expansion fans | expansion fans | shock-expansion theory | shock-expansion theory | transonic | transonic | critical mach number | critical mach number | wing sweep | wing sweep | Kutta condition | Kutta condition | team project | team project | blended-wing-body | blended-wing-body | computational fluid dynamics | computational fluid dynamics | Incompressible | Incompressible

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2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (MIT) 2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to MATLAB®. Numerical methods include number representation and errors, interpolation, differentiation, integration, systems of linear equations, and Fourier interpolation and transforms. Students will study partial and ordinary differential equations as well as elliptic and parabolic differential equations, and solutions by numerical integration, finite difference methods, finite element methods, boundary element methods, and panel methods. This course introduces students to MATLAB®. Numerical methods include number representation and errors, interpolation, differentiation, integration, systems of linear equations, and Fourier interpolation and transforms. Students will study partial and ordinary differential equations as well as elliptic and parabolic differential equations, and solutions by numerical integration, finite difference methods, finite element methods, boundary element methods, and panel methods.

Subjects

numerical methods | numerical methods | interpolation | interpolation | integration | integration | systems of linear equations | systems of linear equations | differential equations | differential equations | numerical integration | numerical integration | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | finite difference methods | finite difference methods | boundary integral equation panel methods | boundary integral equation panel methods | numerical lifting surface computations | numerical lifting surface computations | Fast Fourier Transforms | Fast Fourier Transforms | Numerical representation | Numerical representation | deterministic and random sea waves | deterministic and random sea waves | Integral boundary layer equations | Integral boundary layer equations | numerical solutions | numerical solutions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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13.024 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (MIT) 13.024 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions.Technical RequirementMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. The .FIN and .OUT are simply data offest tables. They can be viewed with any text reader. RealOne™ This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions.Technical RequirementMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. The .FIN and .OUT are simply data offest tables. They can be viewed with any text reader. RealOne™

Subjects

numerical methods | numerical methods | interpolation | interpolation | differentiation | differentiation | integration | integration | systems of linear equations | systems of linear equations | differential equations | differential equations | numerical integration | numerical integration | partial differential | partial differential | boundary integral equation panel methods | boundary integral equation panel methods | deterministic and random sea waves | deterministic and random sea waves | Fast Fourier Transforms | Fast Fourier Transforms | finite difference methods | finite difference methods | Integral boundary layer equations | Integral boundary layer equations | numerical lifting surface computations | numerical lifting surface computations | Numerical representation | Numerical representation | numerical solutions | numerical solutions | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | incompressible fluid mechanics | incompressible fluid mechanics | calculus | calculus | complex numbers | complex numbers | root finding | root finding | curve fitting | curve fitting | numerical differentiation | numerical differentiation | numerical errors | numerical errors | panel methods | panel methods | oscillating rigid objects | oscillating rigid objects | 2.29 | 2.29

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RES.12-001 Topics in Fluid Dynamics (MIT) RES.12-001 Topics in Fluid Dynamics (MIT)

Description

This collection of three essays was developed from the author's experience teaching the course Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean, offered to graduate students entering the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography. The essays are: 1. Dimensional Analysis of Models and Data Sets: Similarity Solutions and Scaling Analysis,2. A Coriolis Tutorial, and3. Lagrangian and Eulerian Representations of Fluid Flow: Kinematics and the Equations of Motion The goal of this resource is to help each student master the concepts and mathematical tools that make up the foundation of classical and geophysical fluid dynamics. These essays treat these topics in considerably greater depth than a comprehensive fluids textbook can afford, and they are accompanied by data files (MATLAB® and Fortan) that a This collection of three essays was developed from the author's experience teaching the course Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean, offered to graduate students entering the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography. The essays are: 1. Dimensional Analysis of Models and Data Sets: Similarity Solutions and Scaling Analysis,2. A Coriolis Tutorial, and3. Lagrangian and Eulerian Representations of Fluid Flow: Kinematics and the Equations of Motion The goal of this resource is to help each student master the concepts and mathematical tools that make up the foundation of classical and geophysical fluid dynamics. These essays treat these topics in considerably greater depth than a comprehensive fluids textbook can afford, and they are accompanied by data files (MATLAB® and Fortan) that a

Subjects

simple pendulum | simple pendulum | inviscid pendulum | inviscid pendulum | viscous pendulum | viscous pendulum | Reynolds number | Reynolds number | decay rate | decay rate | nonlinear projectile problem | nonlinear projectile problem | Coriolis force | Coriolis force | inertial forces | inertial forces | centrifugal force | centrifugal force | energy budget | energy budget | Lagrangian velocity | Lagrangian velocity | Eulerian velocity | Eulerian velocity | Eulerian equations | Eulerian equations

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2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT) 2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua, the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows, similarity and dimensional analysis, lubrication theory, boundary layers and separation, circulation and vorticity theorems, potential flow, an introduction to turbulence, lift and drag, surface tension and surface tension driven flows. The class assumes students have had one prior undergraduate class in the area of fluid mechanics. Emphasis is placed on being able to formulate and solve typical problems of engineering importance. This course surveys the principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua, the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows, similarity and dimensional analysis, lubrication theory, boundary layers and separation, circulation and vorticity theorems, potential flow, an introduction to turbulence, lift and drag, surface tension and surface tension driven flows. The class assumes students have had one prior undergraduate class in the area of fluid mechanics. Emphasis is placed on being able to formulate and solve typical problems of engineering importance.

Subjects

fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | Mass conservation | Mass conservation | Navier-Stokes equation | Navier-Stokes equation | viscous flows | viscous flows | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | Lubrication theory | Lubrication theory | boundary layer | boundary layer | lift | lift | drag | drag | vorticity theorems | vorticity theorems | Potential flow | Potential flow | turbulence | turbulence | Bernoulli equation | Bernoulli equation | potenial flow | potenial flow | inviscid flow | inviscid flow | flight | flight | surface tension | surface tension

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16.100 Aerodynamics (MIT) 16.100 Aerodynamics (MIT)

Description

This course extends fluid mechanic concepts from Unified Engineering to the aerodynamic performance of wings and bodies in sub/supersonic regimes. 16.100 generally has four components: subsonic potential flows, including source/vortex panel methods; viscous flows, including laminar and turbulent boundary layers; aerodynamics of airfoils and wings, including thin airfoil theory, lifting line theory, and panel method/interacting boundary layer methods; and supersonic and hypersonic airfoil theory. Course material varies each year depending upon the focus of the design problem. This course extends fluid mechanic concepts from Unified Engineering to the aerodynamic performance of wings and bodies in sub/supersonic regimes. 16.100 generally has four components: subsonic potential flows, including source/vortex panel methods; viscous flows, including laminar and turbulent boundary layers; aerodynamics of airfoils and wings, including thin airfoil theory, lifting line theory, and panel method/interacting boundary layer methods; and supersonic and hypersonic airfoil theory. Course material varies each year depending upon the focus of the design problem.

Subjects

aerodynamics | aerodynamics | airflow | airflow | air | air | body | body | aircraft | aircraft | aerodynamic modes | aerodynamic modes | aero | aero | forces | forces | flow | flow | computational | computational | CFD | CFD | aerodynamic analysis | aerodynamic analysis | lift | lift | drag | drag | potential flows | potential flows | imcompressible | imcompressible | supersonic | supersonic | subsonic | subsonic | panel method | panel method | vortex lattice method | vortex lattice method | boudary layer | boudary layer | transition | transition | turbulence | turbulence | inviscid | inviscid | viscous | viscous | euler | euler | navier-stokes | navier-stokes | wind tunnel | wind tunnel | flow similarity | flow similarity | non-dimensional | non-dimensional | mach number | mach number | reynolds number | reynolds number | integral momentum | integral momentum | airfoil | airfoil | wing | wing | stall | stall | friction drag | friction drag | induced drag | induced drag | wave drag | wave drag | pressure drag | pressure drag | fluid element | fluid element | shear strain | shear strain | normal strain | normal strain | vorticity | vorticity | divergence | divergence | substantial derivative | substantial derivative | laminar | laminar | displacement thickness | displacement thickness | momentum thickness | momentum thickness | skin friction | skin friction | separation | separation | velocity profile | velocity profile | 2-d panel | 2-d panel | 3-d vortex | 3-d vortex | thin airfoil | thin airfoil | lifting line | lifting line | aspect ratio | aspect ratio | twist | twist | camber | camber | wing loading | wing loading | roll moments | roll moments | finite volume approximation | finite volume approximation | shocks | shocks | expansion fans | expansion fans | shock-expansion theory | shock-expansion theory | transonic | transonic | critical mach number | critical mach number | wing sweep | wing sweep | Kutta condition | Kutta condition | team project | team project | blended-wing-body | blended-wing-body | computational fluid dynamics | computational fluid dynamics

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13.024 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions.Technical RequirementMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. The .FIN and .OUT are simply data offest tables. They can be viewed with any text reader. RealOne™

Subjects

numerical methods | interpolation | differentiation | integration | systems of linear equations | differential equations | numerical integration | partial differential | boundary integral equation panel methods | deterministic and random sea waves | Fast Fourier Transforms | finite difference methods | Integral boundary layer equations | numerical lifting surface computations | Numerical representation | numerical solutions | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | incompressible fluid mechanics | calculus | complex numbers | root finding | curve fitting | numerical differentiation | numerical errors | panel methods | oscillating rigid objects | 2.29

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2.29 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (13.024) (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.024. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mechanical Engineering), and this course was renumber

Subjects

numerical methods | interpolation | differentiation | integration | systems of linear equations | differential equations | numerical integration | partial differential | boundary integral equation panel methods | deterministic and random sea waves | Fast Fourier Transforms | finite difference methods | Integral boundary layer equations | numerical lifting surface computations | Numerical representation | numerical solutions | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | incompressible fluid mechanics | calculus | complex numbers | root finding | curve fitting | numerical differentiation | numerical errors | panel methods | oscillating rigid objects

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2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua, the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows, similarity and dimensional analysis, lubrication theory, boundary layers and separation, circulation and vorticity theorems, potential flow, an introduction to turbulence, lift and drag, surface tension and surface tension driven flows. The class assumes students have had one prior undergraduate class in the area of fluid mechanics. Emphasis is placed on being able to formulate and solve typical problems of engineering importance.

Subjects

fluid dynamics | Mass conservation | Navier-Stokes equation | viscous flows | dimensional analysis | Lubrication theory | boundary layer | lift | drag | vorticity theorems | Potential flow | turbulence | Bernoulli equation | potenial flow | inviscid flow | flight | surface tension

License

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20.330J Fields, Forces and Flows in Biological Systems (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the basic driving forces for electric current, fluid flow, and mass transport, plus their application to a variety of biological systems. Basic mathematical and engineering tools will be introduced, in the context of biology and physiology. Various electrokinetic phenomena are also considered as an example of coupled nature of chemical-electro-mechanical driving forces. Applications include transport in biological tissues and across membranes, manipulation of cells and biomolecules, and microfluidics.

Subjects

hydrodynamic flow | electroosmosis | diffusion | electrophoresis | reaction | membrane | cell | biomolecule | microfluidics | ion transport | electrokinetics | Debye layer | Zeta potential | inviscid flow | viscous flow | tissue | organ | biology | molecular biology | Maxwell's equations | electro-quasistatics | Van der Waals | bioMEMS

License

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IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified Engineering | aerospace | CDIO | C-D-I-O | conceive | design | implement | operate | team | team-based | discipline | materials | structures | materials and structures | computers | programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | propulsion | signals | systems | signals and systems | systems problems | fundamentals | technical communication | graphical communication | communication | reading | research | experimentation | personal response system | prs | active learning | First law | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | work | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | energy exchange | processes | heat engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | flows | path-dependence | path-independence | reversibility | irreversibility | state | thermodynamic state | performance | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | cycles | thermal pressures | temperatures | linear static networks | loop method | node method | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | state methods | state concepts | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | sources | voltages | currents | Thevinin | Norton | initial value problems | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | transfer function | ada | ada programming | programming language | software systems | programming style | computer architecture | program language evolution | classification | numerical computation | number representation systems | assembly | SimpleSIM | RISC | CISC | operating systems | single user | multitasking | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | recursive | execution time | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | mach | reynolds | conservation | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | continuity | inviscid | steady flow | simple bodies | airfoils | wings | channels | aerodynamics | forces | moments | equilibrium | freebody diagram | free-body | free body | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | support reactions | reactions | static determinance | determinate systems | truss analysis | trusses | method of joints | method of sections | statically indeterminate | three great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | stress | extensional stress | shear stress | notation | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | mohr | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | strain | extensional strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | compatibility | strain transformation | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | classes of materials | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | atomic packing | crystals | crystal structures | polymers | estimate of moduli | moduli | composites | composite materials | modulus limited design | material selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | orthotropy | measurements | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | models | engineering systems | experiments | investigations | experimental error | design evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | effects of engineering | social context | engineering drawings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified Engineering | aerospace | CDIO | C-D-I-O | conceive | design | implement | operate | team | team-based | discipline | materials | structures | materials and structures | computers | programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | propulsion | signals | systems | signals and systems | systems problems | fundamentals | technical communication | graphical communication | communication | reading | research | experimentation | personal response system | prs | active learning | First law | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | work | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | energy exchange | processes | heat engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | flows | path-dependence | path-independence | reversibility | irreversibility | state | thermodynamic state | performance | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | cycles | thermal pressures | temperatures | linear static networks | loop method | node method | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | state methods | state concepts | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | sources | voltages | currents | Thevinin | Norton | initial value problems | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | transfer function | ada | ada programming | programming language | software systems | programming style | computer architecture | program language evolution | classification | numerical computation | number representation systems | assembly | SimpleSIM | RISC | CISC | operating systems | single user | multitasking | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | recursive | execution time | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | mach | reynolds | conservation | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | continuity | inviscid | steady flow | simple bodies | airfoils | wings | channels | aerodynamics | forces | moments | equilibrium | freebody diagram | free-body | free body | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | support reactions | reactions | static determinance | determinate systems | truss analysis | trusses | method of joints | method of sections | statically indeterminate | three great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | stress | extensional stress | shear stress | notation | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | mohr | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | strain | extensional strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | compatibility | strain transformation | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | classes of materials | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | atomic packing | crystals | crystal structures | polymers | estimate of moduli | moduli | composites | composite materials | modulus limited design | material selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | orthotropy | measurements | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | models | engineering systems | experiments | investigations | experimental error | design evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | effects of engineering | social context | engineering drawings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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RES.12-001 Topics in Fluid Dynamics (MIT)

Description

This collection of three essays was developed from the author's experience teaching the course Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean, offered to graduate students entering the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography. The essays are: 1. Dimensional Analysis of Models and Data Sets: Similarity Solutions and Scaling Analysis,2. A Coriolis Tutorial, and3. Lagrangian and Eulerian Representations of Fluid Flow: Kinematics and the Equations of Motion The goal of this resource is to help each student master the concepts and mathematical tools that make up the foundation of classical and geophysical fluid dynamics. These essays treat these topics in considerably greater depth than a comprehensive fluids textbook can afford, and they are accompanied by data files (MATLAB® and Fortan) that a

Subjects

simple pendulum | inviscid pendulum | viscous pendulum | Reynolds number | decay rate | nonlinear projectile problem | Coriolis force | inertial forces | centrifugal force | energy budget | Lagrangian velocity | Eulerian velocity | Eulerian equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course is a survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua; Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows; similarity and dimensional analysis; lubrication theory; boundary layers and separation; circulation and vorticity theorems; potential flow; introduction to turbulence; lift and drag; surface tension and surface tension driven flows.

Subjects

fluid dynamics | Mass conservation | Navier-Stokes equation | viscous flows | dimensional analysis | Lubrication theory | boundary layer | lift | drag | vorticity theorems | Potential flow | turbulence | Bernoulli equation | potenial flow | inviscid flow | flight | surface tension

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.100 Aerodynamics (MIT)

Description

This course extends fluid mechanic concepts from Unified Engineering to the aerodynamic performance of wings and bodies in sub/supersonic regimes. 16.100 generally has four components: subsonic potential flows, including source/vortex panel methods; viscous flows, including laminar and turbulent boundary layers; aerodynamics of airfoils and wings, including thin airfoil theory, lifting line theory, and panel method/interacting boundary layer methods; and supersonic and hypersonic airfoil theory. Course material varies each year depending upon the focus of the design problem.

Subjects

aerodynamics | airflow | air | body | aircraft | aerodynamic modes | aero | forces | flow | computational | CFD | aerodynamic analysis | lift | drag | potential flows | imcompressible | supersonic | subsonic | panel method | vortex lattice method | boudary layer | transition | turbulence | inviscid | viscous | euler | navier-stokes | wind tunnel | flow similarity | non-dimensional | mach number | reynolds number | integral momentum | airfoil | wing | stall | friction drag | induced drag | wave drag | pressure drag | fluid element | shear strain | normal strain | vorticity | divergence | substantial derivative | laminar | displacement thickness | momentum thickness | skin friction | separation | velocity profile | 2-d panel | 3-d vortex | thin airfoil | lifting line | aspect ratio | twist | camber | wing loading | roll moments | finite volume approximation | shocks | expansion fans | shock-expansion theory | transonic | critical mach number | wing sweep | Kutta condition | team project | blended-wing-body | computational fluid dynamics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files

Subjects

Unified | Unified Engineering | aerospace | CDIO | C-D-I-O | conceive | design | implement | operate | team | team-based | discipline | materials | structures | materials and structures | computers | programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | propulsion | signals | systems | signals and systems | systems problems | fundamentals | technical communication | graphical communication | communication | reading | research | experimentation | personal response system | prs | active learning | First law | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | work | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | energy exchange | processes | heat engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | flows | path-dependence | path-independence | reversibility | irreversibility | state | thermodynamic state | performance | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | cycles | thermal pressures | temperatures | linear static networks | loop method | node method | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | state methods | state concepts | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | sources | voltages | currents | Thevinin | Norton | initial value problems | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | transfer function | ada | ada programming | programming language | software systems | programming style | computer architecture | program language evolution | classification | numerical computation | number representation systems | assembly | SimpleSIM | RISC | CISC | operating systems | single user | multitasking | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | recursive | execution time | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | mach | reynolds | conservation | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | continuity | inviscid | steady flow | simple bodies | airfoils | wings | channels | aerodynamics | forces | moments | equilibrium | freebody diagram | free-body | free body | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | support reactions | reactions | static determinance | determinate systems | truss analysis | trusses | method of joints | method of sections | statically indeterminate | three great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | stress | extensional stress | shear stress | notation | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | mohr | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | strain | extensional strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | compatibility | strain transformation | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | classes of materials | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | atomic packing | crystals | crystal structures | polymers | estimate of moduli | moduli | composites | composite materials | modulus limited design | material selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | orthotropy | measurements | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | models | engineering systems | experiments | investigations | experimental error | design evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | effects of engineering | social context | engineering drawings | 16.01 | 16.02 | 16.03 | 16.04

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.100 Aerodynamics (MIT)

Description

This course extends fluid mechanic concepts from Unified Engineering to the aerodynamic performance of wings and bodies in sub/supersonic regimes. 16.100 generally has four components: subsonic potential flows, including source/vortex panel methods; viscous flows, including laminar and turbulent boundary layers; aerodynamics of airfoils and wings, including thin airfoil theory, lifting line theory, and panel method/interacting boundary layer methods; and supersonic and hypersonic airfoil theory. Course material varies each year depending upon the focus of the design problem. Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .tar files found on this course site. MATLAB&#1

Subjects

aerodynamics | airflow | air | body | aircraft | aerodynamic modes | aero | forces | flow | computational | CFD | aerodynamic analysis | lift | drag | potential flows | imcompressible | supersonic | subsonic | panel method | vortex lattice method | boudary layer | transition | turbulence | inviscid | viscous | euler | navier-stokes | wind tunnel | flow similarity | non-dimensional | mach number | reynolds number | integral momentum | airfoil | wing | stall | friction drag | induced drag | wave drag | pressure drag | fluid element | shear strain | normal strain | vorticity | divergence | substantial derviative | laminar | displacement thickness | momentum thickness | skin friction | separation | velocity profile | 2-d panel | 3-d vortex | thin airfoil | lifting line | aspect ratio | twist | camber | wing loading | roll moments | finite volume approximation | shocks | expansion fans | shock-expansion theory | transonic | critical mach number | wing sweep | Kutta condition | team project | blended-wing-body | computational fluid dynamics | Incompressible

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to MATLAB®. Numerical methods include number representation and errors, interpolation, differentiation, integration, systems of linear equations, and Fourier interpolation and transforms. Students will study partial and ordinary differential equations as well as elliptic and parabolic differential equations, and solutions by numerical integration, finite difference methods, finite element methods, boundary element methods, and panel methods.

Subjects

numerical methods | interpolation | integration | systems of linear equations | differential equations | numerical integration | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | finite difference methods | boundary integral equation panel methods | numerical lifting surface computations | Fast Fourier Transforms | Numerical representation | deterministic and random sea waves | Integral boundary layer equations | numerical solutions

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