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20.320 Analysis of Biomolecular and Cellular Systems (MIT) 20.320 Analysis of Biomolecular and Cellular Systems (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on computational and experimental analysis of biological systems across a hierarchy of scales, including genetic, molecular, cellular, and cell population levels. The two central themes of the course are modeling of complex dynamic systems and protein design and engineering. Topics include gene sequence analysis, molecular modeling, metabolic and gene regulation networks, signal transduction pathways and cell populations in tissues. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling. This course focuses on computational and experimental analysis of biological systems across a hierarchy of scales, including genetic, molecular, cellular, and cell population levels. The two central themes of the course are modeling of complex dynamic systems and protein design and engineering. Topics include gene sequence analysis, molecular modeling, metabolic and gene regulation networks, signal transduction pathways and cell populations in tissues. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling.

Subjects

biological engineering | biological engineering | kinase | kinase | PyMOL | PyMOL | PyRosetta | PyRosetta | MATLAB | MATLAB | Michaelis-Menten | Michaelis-Menten | bioreactor | bioreactor | bromodomain | bromodomain | protein-ligand interactions | protein-ligand interactions | titration analysis | titration analysis | fractional separation | fractional separation | isothermal titration calorimetry | isothermal titration calorimetry | ITC | ITC | mass spectrometry | mass spectrometry | MS | MS | co-immunoprecipitation | co-immunoprecipitation | Co-IP | Co-IP | Forster resonance energy transfer | Forster resonance energy transfer | FRET | FRET | primary ligation assay | primary ligation assay | PLA | PLA | surface plasmon resonance | surface plasmon resonance | SPR | SPR | enzyme kinetics | enzyme kinetics | kinase engineering | kinase engineering | competitive inhibition | competitive inhibition | epidermal growth factor receptor | epidermal growth factor receptor | mitogen-activated protein kinase | mitogen-activated protein kinase | MAPK | MAPK | genome editing | genome editing | Imatinib | Imatinib | Gleevec | Gleevec | Glivec | Glivec | drug delivery | drug delivery | kinetics of molecular processes | kinetics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | intracellular scale | intracellular scale | extracellular scale | extracellular scale | and cell population scale | and cell population scale | biotechnology applications | biotechnology applications | gene regulation networks | gene regulation networks | nucleic acid hybridization | nucleic acid hybridization | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in bioreactors | cell populations in bioreactors | experimental methods | experimental methods | quantitative analysis | quantitative analysis | computational modeling | computational modeling

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.320 Analysis of Biomolecular and Cellular Systems (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on computational and experimental analysis of biological systems across a hierarchy of scales, including genetic, molecular, cellular, and cell population levels. The two central themes of the course are modeling of complex dynamic systems and protein design and engineering. Topics include gene sequence analysis, molecular modeling, metabolic and gene regulation networks, signal transduction pathways and cell populations in tissues. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling.

Subjects

biological engineering | kinase | PyMOL | PyRosetta | MATLAB | Michaelis-Menten | bioreactor | bromodomain | protein-ligand interactions | titration analysis | fractional separation | isothermal titration calorimetry | ITC | mass spectrometry | MS | co-immunoprecipitation | Co-IP | Forster resonance energy transfer | FRET | primary ligation assay | PLA | surface plasmon resonance | SPR | enzyme kinetics | kinase engineering | competitive inhibition | epidermal growth factor receptor | mitogen-activated protein kinase | MAPK | genome editing | Imatinib | Gleevec | Glivec | drug delivery | kinetics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | intracellular scale | extracellular scale | and cell population scale | biotechnology applications | gene regulation networks | nucleic acid hybridization | signal transduction pathways | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in bioreactors | experimental methods | quantitative analysis | computational modeling

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.341 DNA Damage Checkpoints: The Emergency Brake on the Road to Cancer (MIT) 7.341 DNA Damage Checkpoints: The Emergency Brake on the Road to Cancer (MIT)

Description

The DNA contained in human cells is under constant attack by both exogenous and endogenous agents that can damage one of its three billion base pairs. To cope with this permanent exposure to DNA-damaging agents, such as the sun's radiation or by-products of our normal metabolism, powerful DNA damage checkpoints have evolved that allow organisms to survive this constant assault on their genomes. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understanding of checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. We will consider basic principles of cell proliferation and molecular details of the DNA damage response. We will discuss the methods and model organisms typically used in this field as well as how an The DNA contained in human cells is under constant attack by both exogenous and endogenous agents that can damage one of its three billion base pairs. To cope with this permanent exposure to DNA-damaging agents, such as the sun's radiation or by-products of our normal metabolism, powerful DNA damage checkpoints have evolved that allow organisms to survive this constant assault on their genomes. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understanding of checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. We will consider basic principles of cell proliferation and molecular details of the DNA damage response. We will discuss the methods and model organisms typically used in this field as well as how an

Subjects

DNA | DNA | damage checkpoints | damage checkpoints | cancer | cancer | cells | cells | human cells | human cells | exogenous | exogenous | endogenous | endogenous | checkpoints | checkpoints | gene | gene | signaling | signaling | cancer biology | cancer biology | cancer prevention | cancer prevention | primary sources | primary sources | discussion | discussion | DNA damage | DNA damage | molecular | molecular | enzyme | enzyme | cell cycle | cell cycle | extracellular cues | extracellular cues | growth factors | growth factors | Cdk regulation | Cdk regulation | cyclin-dependent kinase | cyclin-dependent kinase | p53 | p53 | tumor suppressor | tumor suppressor | apoptosis | apoptosis | MDC1 | MDC1 | H2AX | H2AX | Rad50 | Rad50 | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Chk1 | Chk1 | mutant | mutant

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.462 Innovation in Military Organizations (MIT) 17.462 Innovation in Military Organizations (MIT)

Description

This seminar has three purposes. One, it inquires into the causes of military innovation by examining a number of the most outstanding historical cases. Two, it views military innovations through the lens of organization theory to develop generalizations about the innovation process within militaries. Three, it uses the empirical study of military innovations as a way to examine the strength and credibility of hypotheses that organization theorists have generated about innovation in non-military organizations. This seminar has three purposes. One, it inquires into the causes of military innovation by examining a number of the most outstanding historical cases. Two, it views military innovations through the lens of organization theory to develop generalizations about the innovation process within militaries. Three, it uses the empirical study of military innovations as a way to examine the strength and credibility of hypotheses that organization theorists have generated about innovation in non-military organizations.

Subjects

URIECA | URIECA | laboratory | laboratory | kinase | kinase | cancer cells | cancer cells | laboratory techniques | laboratory techniques | DNA | DNA | cultures | cultures | UV-Vis | UV-Vis | agarose gel | agarose gel | Abl-gleevec | Abl-gleevec | affinity tags | affinity tags | lyse | lyse | digest | digest | mutants | mutants | resistance | resistance | gel electrophoresis | gel electrophoresis | recombinant | recombinant | nickel affinity | nickel affinity | inhibitors | inhibitors | biochemistry | biochemistry | kinetics | kinetics | enzyme | enzyme | inhibition | inhibition | purification | purification | expression | expression | Political science | Political science | security studies | security studies | innovation | innovation | military organizations | military organizations | war | war | history | history | organization theory | organization theory | empirical study | empirical study | land warfare | land warfare | battleships | battleships | airpower | airpower | submarines | submarines | cruise | cruise | ballistic | ballistic | missiles | missiles | armor | armor | military affairs | military affairs | strategic | strategic | tactical | tactical | counterinsurgency | counterinsurgency | Vietnam | Vietnam | Revolution in Military Affairs | Revolution in Military Affairs | RMA | RMA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.36 Biochemistry Laboratory (MIT) 5.36 Biochemistry Laboratory (MIT)

Description

The course, which spans two thirds of a semester, provides students with a research-inspired laboratory experience that introduces standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a current and exciting research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Techniques include protein expression, purification, and gel analysis, PCR, site-directed mutagenesis, kinase activity assays, and protein structure viewing. This class is part of the new laboratory curriculum in the MIT Department of Chemistry. Undergraduate Research-Inspired Experimental Chemistry Alternatives (URIECA) introduces students to cutting edge research topics in a modular format. Acknowledgments Development of this course was funded through an HHMI Professors grant to Professor Catherine L. Drennan. The course, which spans two thirds of a semester, provides students with a research-inspired laboratory experience that introduces standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a current and exciting research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Techniques include protein expression, purification, and gel analysis, PCR, site-directed mutagenesis, kinase activity assays, and protein structure viewing. This class is part of the new laboratory curriculum in the MIT Department of Chemistry. Undergraduate Research-Inspired Experimental Chemistry Alternatives (URIECA) introduces students to cutting edge research topics in a modular format. Acknowledgments Development of this course was funded through an HHMI Professors grant to Professor Catherine L. Drennan.

Subjects

URIECA | URIECA | laboratory | laboratory | kinase | kinase | cancer cells | cancer cells | laboratory techniques | laboratory techniques | DNA | DNA | cultures | cultures | UV-Vis | UV-Vis | agarose gel | agarose gel | Abl-gleevec | Abl-gleevec | affinity tags | affinity tags | lyse | lyse | digest | digest | mutants | mutants | resistance | resistance | gel electrophoresis | gel electrophoresis | recombinant | recombinant | nickel affinity | nickel affinity | inhibitors | inhibitors | biochemistry | biochemistry | kinetics | kinetics | enzyme | enzyme | inhibition | inhibition | purification | purification | expression | expression

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.345 Survival in Extreme Conditions: The Bacterial Stress Response (MIT) 7.345 Survival in Extreme Conditions: The Bacterial Stress Response (MIT)

Description

Bacteria survive in almost all environments on Earth, including some considered extremely harsh. From the steaming hot springs of Yellowstone to the frozen tundra of the arctic to the barren deserts of Chile, microbes have been found thriving. Their tenacity to survive in such extreme and varied conditions allows them to play fundamental roles in global nutrient cycling. Microbes also cause a wide range of human diseases and can survive inhospitable conditions found in the human body. In this course, we will examine the molecular systems that bacteria use to adapt to changes in their environment. We will consider stresses commonly encountered, such as starvation, oxidative stress and heat shock, and also discuss how the adaptive responses affect the evolution of the bacteria. This course Bacteria survive in almost all environments on Earth, including some considered extremely harsh. From the steaming hot springs of Yellowstone to the frozen tundra of the arctic to the barren deserts of Chile, microbes have been found thriving. Their tenacity to survive in such extreme and varied conditions allows them to play fundamental roles in global nutrient cycling. Microbes also cause a wide range of human diseases and can survive inhospitable conditions found in the human body. In this course, we will examine the molecular systems that bacteria use to adapt to changes in their environment. We will consider stresses commonly encountered, such as starvation, oxidative stress and heat shock, and also discuss how the adaptive responses affect the evolution of the bacteria. This course

Subjects

bacteria | bacteria | microbes | microbes | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | cellular response | cellular response | model systems | model systems | Escherichia coli | Escherichia coli | Bacillus subtilis | Bacillus subtilis | oxidative stress | oxidative stress | starvation | starvation | heat shock | heat shock | dormant state | dormant state | microbial stress response | microbial stress response | bacterial genetics | bacterial genetics | microbiology | microbiology | sporulation | sporulation | sRNAs | sRNAs | histidine kinases | histidine kinases | response regulators | response regulators | mRNAs | mRNAs | RpoS | RpoS | small molecules | small molecules | efflux pumps | efflux pumps | Pseudomonas aeruginosa | Pseudomonas aeruginosa

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.341 The DNA Damage Response as a Target for Anti-Cancer Therapy (MIT) 7.341 The DNA Damage Response as a Target for Anti-Cancer Therapy (MIT)

Description

Cellular responses to DNA damage constitute one of the most important fields in cancer biology. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understand of cell cycle regulation and DNA damage checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching. Cellular responses to DNA damage constitute one of the most important fields in cancer biology. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understand of cell cycle regulation and DNA damage checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching.

Subjects

DNA | DNA | damage checkpoints | damage checkpoints | cancer | cancer | cells | cells | human cells | human cells | exogenous | exogenous | endogenous | endogenous | checkpoints | checkpoints | gene | gene | signaling | signaling | cancer biology | cancer biology | cancer prevention | cancer prevention | primary sources | primary sources | discussion | discussion | DNA damage | DNA damage | molecular | molecular | enzyme | enzyme | cell cycle | cell cycle | extracellular cues | extracellular cues | growth factors | growth factors | Cdk regulation | Cdk regulation | cyclin-dependent kinase | cyclin-dependent kinase | p53 | p53 | tumor suppressor | tumor suppressor | apoptosis | apoptosis | MDC1 | MDC1 | H2AX | H2AX | Rad50 | Rad50 | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Chk1 | Chk1 | mutant | mutant

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Genetics and Diabetes

Description

Dr Anna Gloyn talks about her research on the genetics of Diabetes. The research undertaken by Dr Anna Gloyn focuses on using naturally genetic variants identified in humans as tools to identify critical regulatory pathways for insulin secretion and action. Current research projects are focused on the translation of genetic association signals for type 2 diabetes and glycaemic traits into molecular mechanisms for diabetes and clinically useful tools. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

glucokinase | beta-cell dysfunction | insulin resistance | genetics | diabetes | glucokinase | beta-cell dysfunction | insulin resistance | genetics | diabetes

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The treatment of severe malaria

Description

Prof. Arjen Dondorp tells us about his work on severe malaria and the development of new therapies. Prof Arjen Dondorp is the Deputy Director and Head of Malaria Research at the Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit in Bangkok, Thailand. His main research interests include the pathophysiology and treatment of severe malaria, antimalarial drug resistance and the improvement of intensive care practice in developing countries. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

glucokinase | beta-cell dysfunction | insulin resistance | genetics | diabetes | glucokinase | beta-cell dysfunction | insulin resistance | genetics | diabetes

License

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Genetics and Diabetes

Description

Dr Anna Gloyn talks about her research on the genetics of Diabetes. The research undertaken by Dr Anna Gloyn focuses on using naturally genetic variants identified in humans as tools to identify critical regulatory pathways for insulin secretion and action. Current research projects are focused on the translation of genetic association signals for type 2 diabetes and glycaemic traits into molecular mechanisms for diabetes and clinically useful tools. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

glucokinase | beta-cell dysfunction | insulin resistance | genetics | diabetes | glucokinase | beta-cell dysfunction | insulin resistance | genetics | diabetes

License

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The treatment of severe malaria

Description

Prof. Arjen Dondorp tells us about his work on severe malaria and the development of new therapies. Prof Arjen Dondorp is the Deputy Director and Head of Malaria Research at the Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit in Bangkok, Thailand. His main research interests include the pathophysiology and treatment of severe malaria, antimalarial drug resistance and the improvement of intensive care practice in developing countries. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

glucokinase | beta-cell dysfunction | insulin resistance | genetics | diabetes | glucokinase | beta-cell dysfunction | insulin resistance | genetics | diabetes

License

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Virtual laboratories in Molecular and Cell Biology - Intracellular signalling

Description

A virtual laboratory which allows users to analyse intracellular signalling pathways. The programme allows the student to stimulate cells for different periods of time and analyse phosphorylation/activation of kinases in the signalling pathways, using SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. Use of different cell types (dominant-negative mutants) and pull-down assays allows them to derive the hierarchy in the signalling pathways. The programme first introduces the theory behind the techniques. It then takes the student through a series of guided questions, which they answer by going to the virtual laboratory to devise and interpret their own experiments. Results from the experiments (gels and blots) can be saved to produce laboratory reports. The programme is an installer which places all the files re

Subjects

bioukoer | kinases | phosphorylation | sds-page | immunoblotting | map kinase pathway | pdgf receptor | enzyme inhibitors | writing a laboratory report | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Cell Signalling

Description

A chapter which describes the mechanisms of signal transduction in a eukaryotic cell, including the activation of G-proteins and kinase cascades (49 figures). The unit is intended as ~10hrs study at level 2/3. It also provides background reading for the experimental investigation 'Investigating intracellular signalling pathways' (http://open.jorum.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/1581).

Subjects

bioukoer | ukoer | signal transduction | g-proteins | receptors | protein kinases | kinase cascades | transcription factors | protein phosphatases | glucose metabolism | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.342 Personal Genomics and Medicine: What's in Your Genome? (MIT) 7.342 Personal Genomics and Medicine: What's in Your Genome? (MIT)

Description

Human genome sequencing has revolutionized our understanding of disease susceptibility, drug metabolism and human ancestry. This course will explore how these advances have been made possible by revolutionary new sequencing methodologies that have decreased costs and increased throughput of genome analysis, making it possible to examine genetic correlates for a variety of biological processes and disorders. The course will combine discussions of primary scientific research papers with hands-on data analysis and small group presentations. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a Human genome sequencing has revolutionized our understanding of disease susceptibility, drug metabolism and human ancestry. This course will explore how these advances have been made possible by revolutionary new sequencing methodologies that have decreased costs and increased throughput of genome analysis, making it possible to examine genetic correlates for a variety of biological processes and disorders. The course will combine discussions of primary scientific research papers with hands-on data analysis and small group presentations. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a

Subjects

genome sequencing | genome sequencing | genome analysis | genome analysis | disease susceptibility | disease susceptibility | drug metabolism | drug metabolism | human ancestry | human ancestry | mitochondrial DNA | mitochondrial DNA | tyrosine kinase inhibitors | tyrosine kinase inhibitors | BCR-ABL gene fusion | BCR-ABL gene fusion | PCSK9 inhibitors | PCSK9 inhibitors | hypercholesterolemia | hypercholesterolemia | genetic testing | genetic testing | next generation sequencing | next generation sequencing | Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) | Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) | copy number variations (CNVs) | copy number variations (CNVs) | genome-wide association studies (GWAS) | genome-wide association studies (GWAS) | Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) | Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) | mosaics | mosaics | chimeras | chimeras | bioinformatics | bioinformatics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Effectors in cellular signalling pathways : final assessment QTI

Description

Interactive material created as part of the CeLLs Project (www.cellsproject.org) covering the topic of Effectors in Cellular Signalling Pathways. This is the final assessment in QTI format which requires additional software to view.

Subjects

cell signalling | adenylyl cyclase | guanylyl cyclase | phospholipases | kinases | MATHEMATICS | Biological Sciences | Assessment | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL07 = SCQF 7 | Higher Certificate | NICAT 4 | CQFW 4 | NVQ 4 | Advanced Higher | SVQ 4 | HN Certificate | UK EL08 = SCQF 8 | Higher Diploma | NICAT 5 | CQFW 5 | HN Diploma | Diploma in HE | UK EL09 = SCQF 9 | Ordinary degree | NICAT 6 | CQFW 6 | NVQ 5 | SVQ 5 | Ordinary degree | Graduate certific | Biological sciences | C000 | SCIENCES and MATHEMATICS | R

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Basic concepts of receptors, their major categories and G-Proteins : final assessment SCORM

Description

Interactive material created as part of the CeLLs Project (www.cellsproject.org) covering the topic of Basic Concepts of Receptors.

Subjects

receptors | cellular signalling | intracellular communication | intercellular communication | homeostasis | tyrosine kinase | ion channels | ligands | g-proteins | MATHEMATICS | Biological Sciences | Assessment | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL06 = SCQF 6 | Advanced courses | NICAT 3 | CQFW 3 | Advanced | A/AS Level | NVQ 3 | Higher | SVQ 3 | UK EL07 = SCQF 7 | Higher Certificate | NICAT 4 | CQFW 4 | NVQ 4 | Advanced Higher | SVQ 4 | HN Certificate | UK EL08 = SCQF 8 | Higher Diploma | NICAT 5 | CQFW 5 | HN Diploma | Diploma in HE | UK EL09 = SCQF 9 | Ordinary degree | NICAT 6 | CQFW 6 | NVQ 5 | SVQ 5 | Ordinary degree | Graduate certific | Biological sciences | C000 | SCIENCES and MATHEMATICS | R

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Basic concepts of receptors, their major categories and G-proteins : learning materials

Description

Interactive material created as part of the CeLLs Project (www.cellsproject.org) covering the topic of Basic Concepts of Receptors.

Subjects

receptors | cellular signalling | intracellular communication | intercellular communication | homeostasis | tyrosine kinase | ion channels | ligands | g-proteins | MATHEMATICS | Biological Sciences | Learning | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL06 = SCQF 6 | Advanced courses | NICAT 3 | CQFW 3 | Advanced | A/AS Level | NVQ 3 | Higher | SVQ 3 | UK EL07 = SCQF 7 | Higher Certificate | NICAT 4 | CQFW 4 | NVQ 4 | Advanced Higher | SVQ 4 | HN Certificate | UK EL08 = SCQF 8 | Higher Diploma | NICAT 5 | CQFW 5 | HN Diploma | Diploma in HE | UK EL09 = SCQF 9 | Ordinary degree | NICAT 6 | CQFW 6 | NVQ 5 | SVQ 5 | Ordinary degree | Graduate certific | Biological sciences | C000 | SCIENCES and MATHEMATICS | R

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Effectors in cellular signalling pathways : final assessment SCORM format

Description

Interactive material created as part of the CeLLs Project (www.cellsproject.org) covering the topic of Effectors in Cellular Signalling Pathways. This is an assessment in SCORM format.

Subjects

cell signalling | adenylyl cyclase | guanylyl cyclase | phospholipases | kinases | MATHEMATICS | Biological Sciences | Assessment | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL07 = SCQF 7 | Higher Certificate | NICAT 4 | CQFW 4 | NVQ 4 | Advanced Higher | SVQ 4 | HN Certificate | UK EL08 = SCQF 8 | Higher Diploma | NICAT 5 | CQFW 5 | HN Diploma | Diploma in HE | UK EL09 = SCQF 9 | Ordinary degree | NICAT 6 | CQFW 6 | NVQ 5 | SVQ 5 | Ordinary degree | Graduate certific | Biological sciences | C000 | SCIENCES and MATHEMATICS | R

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Basic concepts of receptors, their major categories and G-proteins : final assessment QTI

Description

Interactive material created as part of the CeLLs Project (www.cellsproject.org) covering the topic of Basic Concepts of Receptors.

Subjects

receptors | cellular signalling | intracellular communication | intercellular communication | homeostasis | tyrosine kinase | ion channels | ligands | g-proteins | MATHEMATICS | Biological Sciences | Assessment | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL06 = SCQF 6 | Advanced courses | NICAT 3 | CQFW 3 | Advanced | A/AS Level | NVQ 3 | Higher | SVQ 3 | UK EL07 = SCQF 7 | Higher Certificate | NICAT 4 | CQFW 4 | NVQ 4 | Advanced Higher | SVQ 4 | HN Certificate | UK EL08 = SCQF 8 | Higher Diploma | NICAT 5 | CQFW 5 | HN Diploma | Diploma in HE | UK EL09 = SCQF 9 | Ordinary degree | NICAT 6 | CQFW 6 | NVQ 5 | SVQ 5 | Ordinary degree | Graduate certific | Biological sciences | C000 | SCIENCES and MATHEMATICS | R

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Effectors in cellular signalling pathways : learning materials

Description

Interactive material created as part of the CeLLs Project (www.cellsproject.org) covering the topic of Effectors in Cellular Signalling Pathways.

Subjects

adenylyl cyclase | guanylyl cyclase | cell signalling | phospholipases | kinases | MATHEMATICS | Biological Sciences | Learning | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL07 = SCQF 7 | Higher Certificate | NICAT 4 | CQFW 4 | NVQ 4 | Advanced Higher | SVQ 4 | HN Certificate | UK EL08 = SCQF 8 | Higher Diploma | NICAT 5 | CQFW 5 | HN Diploma | Diploma in HE | UK EL09 = SCQF 9 | Ordinary degree | NICAT 6 | CQFW 6 | NVQ 5 | SVQ 5 | Ordinary degree | Graduate certific | Biological sciences | C000 | SCIENCES and MATHEMATICS | R

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.341 DNA Damage Checkpoints: The Emergency Brake on the Road to Cancer (MIT)

Description

The DNA contained in human cells is under constant attack by both exogenous and endogenous agents that can damage one of its three billion base pairs. To cope with this permanent exposure to DNA-damaging agents, such as the sun's radiation or by-products of our normal metabolism, powerful DNA damage checkpoints have evolved that allow organisms to survive this constant assault on their genomes. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understanding of checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. We will consider basic principles of cell proliferation and molecular details of the DNA damage response. We will discuss the methods and model organisms typically used in this field as well as how an

Subjects

DNA | damage checkpoints | cancer | cells | human cells | exogenous | endogenous | checkpoints | gene | signaling | cancer biology | cancer prevention | primary sources | discussion | DNA damage | molecular | enzyme | cell cycle | extracellular cues | growth factors | Cdk regulation | cyclin-dependent kinase | p53 | tumor suppressor | apoptosis | MDC1 | H2AX | Rad50 | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Chk1 | mutant

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.342 Personal Genomics and Medicine: What's in Your Genome? (MIT)

Description

Human genome sequencing has revolutionized our understanding of disease susceptibility, drug metabolism and human ancestry. This course will explore how these advances have been made possible by revolutionary new sequencing methodologies that have decreased costs and increased throughput of genome analysis, making it possible to examine genetic correlates for a variety of biological processes and disorders. The course will combine discussions of primary scientific research papers with hands-on data analysis and small group presentations. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a

Subjects

genome sequencing | genome analysis | disease susceptibility | drug metabolism | human ancestry | mitochondrial DNA | tyrosine kinase inhibitors | BCR-ABL gene fusion | PCSK9 inhibitors | hypercholesterolemia | genetic testing | next generation sequencing | Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) | copy number variations (CNVs) | genome-wide association studies (GWAS) | Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) | mosaics | chimeras | bioinformatics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.345 Survival in Extreme Conditions: The Bacterial Stress Response (MIT)

Description

Bacteria survive in almost all environments on Earth, including some considered extremely harsh. From the steaming hot springs of Yellowstone to the frozen tundra of the arctic to the barren deserts of Chile, microbes have been found thriving. Their tenacity to survive in such extreme and varied conditions allows them to play fundamental roles in global nutrient cycling. Microbes also cause a wide range of human diseases and can survive inhospitable conditions found in the human body. In this course, we will examine the molecular systems that bacteria use to adapt to changes in their environment. We will consider stresses commonly encountered, such as starvation, oxidative stress and heat shock, and also discuss how the adaptive responses affect the evolution of the bacteria. This course

Subjects

bacteria | microbes | signal transduction pathways | cellular response | model systems | Escherichia coli | Bacillus subtilis | oxidative stress | starvation | heat shock | dormant state | microbial stress response | bacterial genetics | microbiology | sporulation | sRNAs | histidine kinases | response regulators | mRNAs | RpoS | small molecules | efflux pumps | Pseudomonas aeruginosa

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.341 The DNA Damage Response as a Target for Anti-Cancer Therapy (MIT)

Description

Cellular responses to DNA damage constitute one of the most important fields in cancer biology. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understand of cell cycle regulation and DNA damage checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching.

Subjects

DNA | damage checkpoints | cancer | cells | human cells | exogenous | endogenous | checkpoints | gene | signaling | cancer biology | cancer prevention | primary sources | discussion | DNA damage | molecular | enzyme | cell cycle | extracellular cues | growth factors | Cdk regulation | cyclin-dependent kinase | p53 | tumor suppressor | apoptosis | MDC1 | H2AX | Rad50 | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Chk1 | mutant

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.462 Innovation in Military Organizations (MIT)

Description

This seminar has three purposes. One, it inquires into the causes of military innovation by examining a number of the most outstanding historical cases. Two, it views military innovations through the lens of organization theory to develop generalizations about the innovation process within militaries. Three, it uses the empirical study of military innovations as a way to examine the strength and credibility of hypotheses that organization theorists have generated about innovation in non-military organizations.

Subjects

URIECA | laboratory | kinase | cancer cells | laboratory techniques | DNA | cultures | UV-Vis | agarose gel | Abl-gleevec | affinity tags | lyse | digest | mutants | resistance | gel electrophoresis | recombinant | nickel affinity | inhibitors | biochemistry | kinetics | enzyme | inhibition | purification | expression | Political science | security studies | innovation | military organizations | war | history | organization theory | empirical study | land warfare | battleships | airpower | submarines | cruise | ballistic | missiles | armor | military affairs | strategic | tactical | counterinsurgency | Vietnam | Revolution in Military Affairs | RMA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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