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STS.330 History and Anthropology of Medicine and Biology (MIT) STS.330 History and Anthropology of Medicine and Biology (MIT)

Description

This course explores recent historical and anthropological approaches to the study of medicine and biology. Topics include histories of bodies and embodiment in medicine; institutional and social genealogies and futures for genes and genomes; the role of science and medicine in racial formation; epidemics and emergent diseases; new reproductive technologies and socialities; the laboratory and field lives of animals, plants, microbes, molecules, and environments. This course explores recent historical and anthropological approaches to the study of medicine and biology. Topics include histories of bodies and embodiment in medicine; institutional and social genealogies and futures for genes and genomes; the role of science and medicine in racial formation; epidemics and emergent diseases; new reproductive technologies and socialities; the laboratory and field lives of animals, plants, microbes, molecules, and environments.

Subjects

historical medicine | historical medicine | medieval dissection | medieval dissection | gender | gender | visible human project | visible human project | genealogies | genealogies | genome | genome | biological kinship | biological kinship | biology of race | biology of race | race and disease | race and disease | emerging diseases | emerging diseases | human relationship with animals | human relationship with animals | reproductive technologies | reproductive technologies | therapeutics | therapeutics | bioprospecting | bioprospecting | climate change | climate change | environmental technology | environmental technology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT) 21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT)

Description

This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora. This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora.

Subjects

21A.460 | 21A.460 | WGS.620 | WGS.620 | Medicine | Medicine | Religion | Religion | Politics Africa | Politics Africa | African Diaspora | African Diaspora | colonial | colonial | postcolonial clashes | postcolonial clashes | theories of healing | theories of healing | embodiment; western | embodiment; western | bio-medicine | bio-medicine | Afro-Atlantic | Afro-Atlantic | traditions | traditions | illness | illness | healing | healing | body | body | alternative | alternative | morality | morality | rationality | rationality | kinship | kinship | gender | gender | sexuality; imperial | sexuality; imperial | power | power | global | global | health. | health. | embodiment | embodiment | western | western | sexuality | sexuality | imperial | imperial | health | health | SP.620J | SP.620J | SP.620 | SP.620

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Gender Studies Seminar: Latina Women's Voices (MIT) Gender Studies Seminar: Latina Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

This course will explore the rich diversity of women's voices and experiences as reflected in writings and films by and about Latina writers, filmmakers, and artists. Through close readings, class discussions and independently researched student presentations related to each text, we will explore not only the unique, individual voice of the writer, but also the cultural, social and political contexts which inform their narratives. We will also examine the roles that gender, familial ties and social and political preoccupations play in shaping the values of the writers and the nature of the characters encountered in the texts and films. This course will explore the rich diversity of women's voices and experiences as reflected in writings and films by and about Latina writers, filmmakers, and artists. Through close readings, class discussions and independently researched student presentations related to each text, we will explore not only the unique, individual voice of the writer, but also the cultural, social and political contexts which inform their narratives. We will also examine the roles that gender, familial ties and social and political preoccupations play in shaping the values of the writers and the nature of the characters encountered in the texts and films.

Subjects

Latina | Latina | women | women | code-switching | code-switching | first generation | first generation | coming-of-age | coming-of-age | Chicana | Chicana | roots | roots | revolution | revolution | politics | politics | poverty | | poverty | | social criticism | social criticism | kinship | kinship | biography | biography | magic realism | magic realism | mythical historicism | mythical historicism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.330J History and Anthropology of Medicine and Biology (MIT) STS.330J History and Anthropology of Medicine and Biology (MIT)

Description

This course explores recent historical and anthropological approaches to the study of life, in both medicine and biology. After grounding our conversation in accounts of natural history and medicine that predate the rise of biology as a discipline, we explore modes of theorizing historical and contemporary bioscience. Drawing on the work of historian William Coleman, we examine the forms, functions, and transformations of biological and medical objects of study. Along the way we treat the history of heredity, molecular biology, race, medicine in the colonies and the metropole, and bioeconomic exchange. We read anthropological literature on old and new forms of biopower, at scales from the molecular to the organismic to the global. The course includes readings from the HASTS Common Exam Lis This course explores recent historical and anthropological approaches to the study of life, in both medicine and biology. After grounding our conversation in accounts of natural history and medicine that predate the rise of biology as a discipline, we explore modes of theorizing historical and contemporary bioscience. Drawing on the work of historian William Coleman, we examine the forms, functions, and transformations of biological and medical objects of study. Along the way we treat the history of heredity, molecular biology, race, medicine in the colonies and the metropole, and bioeconomic exchange. We read anthropological literature on old and new forms of biopower, at scales from the molecular to the organismic to the global. The course includes readings from the HASTS Common Exam Lis

Subjects

historical medicine | historical medicine | medieval dissection | medieval dissection | gender | gender | visible human project | visible human project | genealogies | genealogies | genome | genome | biological kinship | biological kinship | biology of race | biology of race | race and disease | race and disease | emerging diseases | emerging diseases | human relationship with animals | human relationship with animals | reproductive technologies | reproductive technologies | therapeutics | therapeutics | bioprospecting | bioprospecting | climate change | climate change | environmental technology | environmental technology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.302J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT) 21A.302J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of biomedical ethics, examining moral foundations of the science and practice of Western biomedicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation and other issues. It evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. Also discussed are critiques of the biomedical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of biomedical ethics, examining moral foundations of the science and practice of Western biomedicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation and other issues. It evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. Also discussed are critiques of the biomedical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

21A.302 | 21A.302 | WGS.271 | WGS.271 | bio-medical ethics | bio-medical ethics | medical technologies | medical technologies | biotechnologies | biotechnologies | halth | halth | sexuality | sexuality | morality | morality | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | kinship | kinship | gender | gender | abortion | abortion | contraception | contraception | reproductive technologies | reproductive technologies | pharmaceuticals | pharmaceuticals | end of life care | end of life care | healing practices | healing practices | anthropology | anthropology | medical experimentation | medical experimentation | sterilization | sterilization | Lynchburg | Lynchburg | biological citizenship | biological citizenship | clinical trials | clinical trials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Gender Studies Seminar: Latina Women's Voices (MIT) Gender Studies Seminar: Latina Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

This course will explore the rich diversity of women's voices and experiences as reflected in writings and films by and about Latina writers, filmmakers, and artists. Through close readings, class discussions and independently researched student presentations related to each text, we will explore not only the unique, individual voice of the writer, but also the cultural, social and political contexts which inform their narratives. We will also examine the roles that gender, familial ties and social and political preoccupations play in shaping the values of the writers and the nature of the characters encountered in the texts and films. This course will explore the rich diversity of women's voices and experiences as reflected in writings and films by and about Latina writers, filmmakers, and artists. Through close readings, class discussions and independently researched student presentations related to each text, we will explore not only the unique, individual voice of the writer, but also the cultural, social and political contexts which inform their narratives. We will also examine the roles that gender, familial ties and social and political preoccupations play in shaping the values of the writers and the nature of the characters encountered in the texts and films.

Subjects

Latina | Latina | women | women | code-switching | code-switching | first generation | first generation | coming-of-age | coming-of-age | Chicana | Chicana | roots | roots | revolution | revolution | politics | politics | poverty | | poverty | | social criticism | social criticism | kinship | kinship | biography | biography | magic realism | magic realism | mythical historicism | mythical historicism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT) 21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | cross-cultural study | cross-cultural study | bio-medical ethics | bio-medical ethics | moral foundations | moral foundations | science | science | western bio-medicine | western bio-medicine | case studies | case studies | abortion | abortion | contraception | contraception | cloning | cloning | organ transplantation | organ transplantation | medical technologies | medical technologies | practice | practice | availability | availability | medical services | medical services | globe | globe | kinship | kinship | personhood | personhood | critique | critique | anthropological | anthropological | feminist | feminist | legal | legal | religious | religious | theorists. | theorists. | theorists | theorists | 21A.216 | 21A.216 | SP.622 | SP.622

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Attribution

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21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

Anthropology | cross-cultural study | bio-medical ethics | moral foundations | science | western bio-medicine | case studies | abortion | contraception | cloning | organ transplantation | medical technologies | practice | availability | medical services | globe | kinship | personhood | critique | anthropological | feminist | legal | religious | theorists. | theorists | 21A.216 | SP.622

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.330J History and Anthropology of Medicine and Biology (MIT)

Description

This course explores recent historical and anthropological approaches to the study of life, in both medicine and biology. After grounding our conversation in accounts of natural history and medicine that predate the rise of biology as a discipline, we explore modes of theorizing historical and contemporary bioscience. Drawing on the work of historian William Coleman, we examine the forms, functions, and transformations of biological and medical objects of study. Along the way we treat the history of heredity, molecular biology, race, medicine in the colonies and the metropole, and bioeconomic exchange. We read anthropological literature on old and new forms of biopower, at scales from the molecular to the organismic to the global. The course includes readings from the HASTS Common Exam Lis

Subjects

historical medicine | medieval dissection | gender | visible human project | genealogies | genome | biological kinship | biology of race | race and disease | emerging diseases | human relationship with animals | reproductive technologies | therapeutics | bioprospecting | climate change | environmental technology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Gender Studies Seminar: Latina Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

This course will explore the rich diversity of women's voices and experiences as reflected in writings and films by and about Latina writers, filmmakers, and artists. Through close readings, class discussions and independently researched student presentations related to each text, we will explore not only the unique, individual voice of the writer, but also the cultural, social and political contexts which inform their narratives. We will also examine the roles that gender, familial ties and social and political preoccupations play in shaping the values of the writers and the nature of the characters encountered in the texts and films.

Subjects

Latina | women | code-switching | first generation | coming-of-age | Chicana | roots | revolution | politics | poverty | | social criticism | kinship | biography | magic realism | mythical historicism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Attribution

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21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

Anthropology | cross-cultural study | bio-medical ethics | moral foundations | science | western bio-medicine | case studies | abortion | contraception | cloning | organ transplantation | medical technologies | practice | availability | medical services | globe | kinship | personhood | critique | anthropological | feminist | legal | religious | theorists. | theorists | 21A.216 | SP.622

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.330J History and Anthropology of Medicine and Biology (MIT)

Description

This course explores recent historical and anthropological approaches to the study of life, in both medicine and biology. After grounding our conversation in accounts of natural history and medicine that predate the rise of biology as a discipline, we explore modes of theorizing historical and contemporary bioscience. Drawing on the work of historian William Coleman, we examine the forms, functions, and transformations of biological and medical objects of study. Along the way we treat the history of heredity, molecular biology, race, medicine in the colonies and the metropole, and bioeconomic exchange. We read anthropological literature on old and new forms of biopower, at scales from the molecular to the organismic to the global. The course includes readings from the HASTS Common Exam Lis

Subjects

historical medicine | medieval dissection | gender | visible human project | genealogies | genome | biological kinship | biology of race | race and disease | emerging diseases | human relationship with animals | reproductive technologies | therapeutics | bioprospecting | climate change | environmental technology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.330 History and Anthropology of Medicine and Biology (MIT)

Description

This course explores recent historical and anthropological approaches to the study of medicine and biology. Topics include histories of bodies and embodiment in medicine; institutional and social genealogies and futures for genes and genomes; the role of science and medicine in racial formation; epidemics and emergent diseases; new reproductive technologies and socialities; the laboratory and field lives of animals, plants, microbes, molecules, and environments.

Subjects

historical medicine | medieval dissection | gender | visible human project | genealogies | genome | biological kinship | biology of race | race and disease | emerging diseases | human relationship with animals | reproductive technologies | therapeutics | bioprospecting | climate change | environmental technology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.302J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of biomedical ethics, examining moral foundations of the science and practice of Western biomedicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation and other issues. It evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. Also discussed are critiques of the biomedical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

21A.302 | WGS.271 | bio-medical ethics | medical technologies | biotechnologies | halth | sexuality | morality | race | ethnicity | kinship | gender | abortion | contraception | reproductive technologies | pharmaceuticals | end of life care | healing practices | anthropology | medical experimentation | sterilization | Lynchburg | biological citizenship | clinical trials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT)

Description

This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora.

Subjects

21A.460 | WGS.620 | Medicine | Religion | Politics Africa | African Diaspora | colonial | postcolonial clashes | theories of healing | embodiment; western | bio-medicine | Afro-Atlantic | traditions | illness | healing | body | alternative | morality | rationality | kinship | gender | sexuality; imperial | power | global | health. | embodiment | western | sexuality | imperial | health | SP.620J | SP.620

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Gender Studies Seminar: Latina Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

This course will explore the rich diversity of women's voices and experiences as reflected in writings and films by and about Latina writers, filmmakers, and artists. Through close readings, class discussions and independently researched student presentations related to each text, we will explore not only the unique, individual voice of the writer, but also the cultural, social and political contexts which inform their narratives. We will also examine the roles that gender, familial ties and social and political preoccupations play in shaping the values of the writers and the nature of the characters encountered in the texts and films.

Subjects

Latina | women | code-switching | first generation | coming-of-age | Chicana | roots | revolution | politics | poverty | | social criticism | kinship | biography | magic realism | mythical historicism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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