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[Transporting ammunition by horse]

Description

Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: [Transporting ammunition by horse] Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea; Seoul Type: Photographs Description: 'Despite the declaration of neutrality by the Choson Government (Yi dynasty), Japanese troops began landing on Inchon city and marched into the capital, Seoul. They are shown here transporting ammunition through the Independence Gate.' This picture was published in the source below, and may not have been taken by Straight himself. Source: Source: Sajin uiro ponun tongnip undong (Independence Movement Through Pictures), 1996, v. 1, p. 51. Inscription/Marks: No inscription. Identifier: 1260.60.09.43.04 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xnf There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | yikoreanperiod | inchonsouthkorea | seoulsouthkorea | japanese | ammunition | culidentifier:value=126060094304 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier

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[Yongnam governor gate with Korean and American flags]

Description

Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: [Yongnam governor gate with Korean and American flags] Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea Type: Photographs Description: The sign on the gate reads 'Yongnam pojongsa' which was an office building for the Yongnam (Kyongsang Province) governor during the Yi Dynasty. American and Korean flags at the governor's office were hoisted to greet the American visitors. Identifier: 1260.61.057.01 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xph There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | kyongsangprovincesouthkorea | americanflags | koreanflags | gateways | municipalbuildings | culidentifier:value=12606105701 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier | flags | americanflag | koreanflag

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[Riverside landscape]

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Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: [Riverside landscape] Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: North Korea Type: Photographs Description: An unknown site of cultural significance and age on a river's bank. It could be the Taedong Riverin Pyongyang, a place we know Willard Strait visited. By inference, this might be the so-called Peony Point (Moran Bong). See the photograph of a likewise structure in 'First Encounters - Korea 1880-1910', p.61. Inscription/Marks: No inscription Identifier: 1260.60.09.37.02 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xmp There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | taedongriverpyongyangnorthkorea | moranbongnorthkorea | culidentifier:value=126060093702 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier

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Banks of Yalu--Korean side

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Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: Banks of Yalu--Korean side Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: North Korea Type: Photographs Description: Banks of Yalu--Korean side. 'Yalu River or Amnokkang in eastern Asia, forming most of the boundary between North Korea and China. About 790 km (490 mi) long, it rises on the southern slopes of the Changbaeksan mountains, flows in a generally southern and southwestern direction, and empties into Korea Bay, an arm of the Yellow Sea, just south of Andong (An-tung), China.' Source: legacy.encarta.msn.com/encnet/refpages/RefArticle.aspx?re... Inscription/Marks: Inscription, apparently in hand of WDS: 'Banks of Yalu--Korean side' Identifier: 1260.60.09.36.02 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xmk There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | yalurivernorthkorea | changbaeksannorthkorea | culidentifier:value=126060093602 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier | tdotacha

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[American Legation interior]

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Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: [American Legation interior] Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea; Seoul Type: Photographs Description: Interior scene of American Legation. A short chronology of U.S. legation buildings in Seoul: 1883:First American Ambassador arrives and occupies Chong-dong Legation House Site behind Doksu Palace at the invitation of King Kojong. 1888: US Government purchases Legation House property from the royal family. 1948: US Government purchases the residential compound adjacent to the Legation House property from the Korean Government. 1959-60: US Government constructs additional residences on the adjacent residential compound, keeping two Japanese-style houses that were on the site when purchased. 1974-76: US Government builds Ambassador's Residence, 'Habib House,' on the Legation House Property 1986: At the Korean Government's suggestion, the U S Government purchases Kyonggi Girl's High School site from the City of Seoul to be used as a new site for its embassy compound. Source: seoul.usembassy.gov/wwwh0510.html Inscription/Marks: Inscription, apparently in hand of WDS: 'Duplicate' Identifier: 1260.60.09.37.04 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xmr There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | americanlegationseoulsouthkorea | chongdongseoulsouthkorea | districts | culidentifier:value=126060093704 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier

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Banzai! first train crosses new Japanese bridge

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Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: Banzai! first train crosses new Japanese bridge Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea Type: Photographs Description: Celebrations surrounding the first train crossing of a newly constructed Japanese bridge. Early train commuting occurred in Korea between Seoul and Pusan as early the 1880s. It is not clear which bridge and where this photograph was taken. Inscription/Marks: Inscription, apparently in hand of WDS: 'Banzai! first train crosses new Japanese bridge' Identifier: 1260.60.09.38.01 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xms There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | trains | seoulsouthkorea | pusansouthkorea | culidentifier:value=126060093801 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier

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[Gathering on city walls]

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Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: [Gathering on city walls] Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea Type: Photographs Description: The scene probably shows people waiting for the procession of Min Yong-hwan's funeral, sitting near one of the gates, either 'Namdaemun' (Sounth Gate) or 'Tongdaemun' (East Gate). Inscription/Marks: No inscription. Identifier: 1260.60.09.44.03 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xng There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | funerals | minyonghwan | namdaemunseoulsouthkorea | tongdaemunseoulsouthkorea | culidentifier:value=126060094403 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier | tdotacha

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Yalu?

Description

Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: Yalu? Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: North Korea Type: Photographs Description: Banks of Yalu--Korean side. 'Yalu or Amnok river in eastern Asia, forming most of the boundary between North Korea and China. About 790 km (490 mi) long, it rises on the southern slopes of the Changbaeksan mountains, flows in a generally southern and southwestern direction, and empties into Korea Bay, an arm of the Yellow Sea, just south of Andong (An-tung), China.' Source: legacy.encarta.msn.com/encnet/refpages/RefArticle.aspx?re... Inscription/Marks: Inscription, apparently in hand of WDS: 'Yalu?' Identifier: 1260.60.09.36.03 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xmm There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | yalurivernorthkorea | changbaeksannorthkorea | culidentifier:value=126060093603 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier | tdotacha

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[American Legation interior]

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Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: [American Legation interior] Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea; Seoul Type: Photographs Description: Interior of the American Legation in Seoul. A short chronology of U.S. Embassy Properties in Korea: 1883:First American Ambassador arrives and occupies Chong-dong Legation House Site behind Doksu Palace at the invitation of King Kojong. 1888: US Government purchases Legation House property from the royal family. 1948: US Government purchases the residential compound adjacent to the Legation House property from the Korean Government. 1959-60: US Government constructs additional residences on the adjacent residential compound, keeping two Japanese-style houses that were on the site when purchased. 1974-76: US Government builds Ambassador's Residence, 'Habib House,' on the Legation House Property 1986: At the Korean Government's suggestion, the U S Government purchases Kyonggi Girl's High School site from the City of Seoul to be used as a new site for its embassy compound. Source: seoul.usembassy.gov/wwwh0510.html Inscription/Marks: Inscription, apparently in hand of WDS: 'Duplicate' Identifier: 1260.60.09.37.03 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xmq There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | americanlegationseoulsouthkorea | chongdongseoulsouthkorea | districts | culidentifier:value=126060093703 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier

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[Middle-class Korean man with warm hat]

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Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: [Middle-class Korean man with warm hat] Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea; Seoul Type: Photographs Description: A man is standing in front of the American Legation on a very cold winter day. He wears a warmer and different hat than an ordinary Korean 'kat' which is worn by men shown behind him. Inscription/Marks: No inscription Identifier: 1260.60.09.55.03 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xnv There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | korean | middleclass | americanlegationseoulsouthkorea | winter | costume | hats | culidentifier:value=126060095503 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier

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21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT) 21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT)

Description

The course examines various aspects of culture in both premodern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.). The course examines various aspects of culture in both premodern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.).

Subjects

east asia | east asia | zen | zen | japanese arts | japanese arts | confucianism | confucianism | literati | literati | imperial china | imperial china | material cutlure | material cutlure | westernization | westernization | globalization | globalization | japanization | japanization | tradition | tradition | weddings | weddings | science fiction | science fiction | food | food | cuisine | cuisine | utopia | utopia | dystopia | dystopia | post-mao china | post-mao china | china | china | japan | japan | korea | korea

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT) 21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT)

Description

The course examines various aspects of culture in both premodern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.). The course examines various aspects of culture in both premodern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.).

Subjects

east asia | east asia | zen | zen | japanese arts | japanese arts | confucianism | confucianism | literati | literati | imperial china | imperial china | material cutlure | material cutlure | westernization | westernization | globalization | globalization | japanization | japanization | tradition | tradition | weddings | weddings | science fiction | science fiction | food | food | cuisine | cuisine | utopia | utopia | dystopia | dystopia | post-mao china | post-mao china | china | china | japan | japan | korea | korea

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT)

Description

The course examines various aspects of culture in both premodern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.).

Subjects

east asia | zen | japanese arts | confucianism | literati | imperial china | material cutlure | westernization | globalization | japanization | tradition | weddings | science fiction | food | cuisine | utopia | dystopia | post-mao china | china | japan | korea

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT)

Description

The course examines various aspects of culture in both premodern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.).

Subjects

east asia | zen | japanese arts | confucianism | literati | imperial china | material cutlure | westernization | globalization | japanization | tradition | weddings | science fiction | food | cuisine | utopia | dystopia | post-mao china | china | japan | korea

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Dancing girl

Description

Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: Dancing girl Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea Type: Postcards/Ephemera Description: A Korean 'kisaeng', or singing girl, dressed up for her performance. A 'kisaeng's' social position was among the lowest in the traditional Korean class system. Their daughters also became 'kisaeng' and their sons became slaves. A dancer is shown wearing a 'hwagwan' (a small crown decorated with flowers and jewels). The art of entertaining of the 'kisaeng' is analogous to the Japanese geisha. These professional entertainers were highly trained in the arts of poetry, music, dance, and other forms of social or artistic diversion. This is a photograph taken in a studio setting, produced for mass production. Source: Kwon, O-chang. Inmurhwaro ponun Choson sidae uri ot, 1998, p. 150. Inscription/Marks: Pencilled inscription on verso of image: 'Dancing girl' Identifier: 1260.74.12.05 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xs7 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | courtesans | costume | studios | crowns | dancers | entertainers | culidentifier:value=1260741205 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier | woman | standing | portrait | oval | crown | dress | kisaeng | korea

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Pagoda Park in Seoul, Corea

Description

Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: Pagoda Park in Seoul, Corea Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea; Seoul Type: Postcards/Ephemera Description: Pagoda Park in Seoul, Korea. The thirteen- story stone pagoda, which is seen at the back of the picture, was 'sent from China as a gift from a Chinese emperor to his daughter when she married a Korean king, perpaps in the twelfth century'. The site is also known as 'Tapgol' Park. It was built as the first modernized park in Korea in 1897 by J.M. Brown, a British counselor to the 'Taehanjeguk' (I.e. Korea). The site was originally a Buddhist temple named 'Heungboksa' in the Koryo era and 'Wongaksa' in the Choson Dynasty, respectively. Sources: Old Seoul by Keith Pratt, 2002. City Facts, Seoul Metropolitan Government, web site english.metro.seoul.kr/visitors/toppic/parks/tapgol/index... Inscription/Marks: Inscription imprinted on image: 'Pagoda Park in Seoul, Corea' Identifier: 1260.74.07.10 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xr6 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | pagodaparktapgolparkseoulsouthkorea | parks | pagodas | culidentifier:value=1260740710 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier

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Families whose ancestors came to Korea with a Japanese Kato Kiyomasa

Description

Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: Families whose ancestors came to Korea with a Japanese Kato Kiyomasa Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea; Kyongsang-pukto Type: Postcards/Ephemera Description: This Japanese post card shows grandchildren and their families whose ancestors came to Korea as subordinates to a certain Japanese by the name of Kato Kiyomasa. The post card indicates that they lived and flourished in 'Kyongsang-pukto' (Kyongsang North Province). Those seated in the front are Japanese explorers. Inscription/Marks: Image imprinted with legend in Japanese characters. Pencilled inscription on verso: 'Policemen South Province.' Identifier: 1260.74.10.01 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xrf There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | family | kyongsangpukto | korea | culidentifier:value=1260741001 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier

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Seoul Town

Description

Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: Seoul Town Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea; Seoul Type: Postcards/Ephemera Description: Scene of old Seoul. Probably looking north from the American legation. Inscription imprinted on image shows both English and Chinese characters. Inscription/Marks: Inscription imprinted on image: 'Seoul Town.' Identifier: 1260.74.07.04 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xr0 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | seoul | capitalcities | culidentifier:value=1260740704 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier | korea

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The Corean imperial throne in Red East Palace

Description

Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: The Corean imperial throne in Red East Palace Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea; Seoul Type: Postcards/Ephemera Description: Throne of 'Kunjongjon' (Hall of Government) at 'Kyongbokkung' (Kyongbok Palace), which is a symbol of absolute royal sovereignty. Eight of the early Yi Dynasty kings were enthroned here, beginning with 'Chongjong' (2nd king, 1398-1400) and ending with 'Sonjo' (14th king, 1567-1608). 'In the center of the audience hall toward the rear is the king's throne. Behind the royal throne is a large painting depicting five peaks with pine trees and rivers flowing seaward. Two round circles at the top of either side of the painting represent the sun and moon, symbolic of west and east.' Source: Adams, Edward B. 'Palaces of Seoul : Yi Dynasty palaces in Korea's capital City', 1972, p. 22. Inscription/Marks: Inscription imprinted on image: 'The Corean imperial throne' and pencilled on verso: 'In red East Palace' Identifier: 1260.74.07.02 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xqx There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | palaces | chongjong | sonjo | thronerooms | kunjongjonkyongbokkungseoulsouthkorea | culidentifier:value=1260740702 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier

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Japanese Soldiers at the Nandai Gate, Seoul

Description

Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: Japanese Soldiers at the Nandai Gate, Seoul Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea; Seoul Type: Postcards/Ephemera Description: Japanese soldiers march into Seoul, shown from outside of Namdaemun (South Gate in Seoul). On the lower right the new railroad tracks can be seen. Inscription/Marks: Inscription imprinted on image: 'A Japanese-soldiers of Nandai-Gate in Soul' Identifier: 1260.74.07.05 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xr1 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | soldiers | gates | namdaemunseoulsouthkorea | militarypersonnel | culidentifier:value=1260740705 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier

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Suiko Gate at Kitakanzan, Seoul

Description

Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: Suiko Gate at Kitakanzan, Seoul Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea; Seoul Type: Postcards/Ephemera Description: The water control gate at 'Pukhansan' (Pukhan Mountain) north of Seoul, controlling the waters of the Han river. The actual construction is two-tiered: top the right the large building sits on top of the actual opening and closing mechanism, whereas the arches to the left are part of the regular river crossing. Inscription/Marks: Inscription imprinted on image: 'Suiko Gate at Kitakanzan, Seoul' Identifier: 1260.74.07.07 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xr3 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | seoul | mountains | pukhansanseoulsouthkorea | floodcontrol | culidentifier:value=1260740707 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier

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White Buddha between here and Peng Yang

Description

Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: White Buddha between here and Peng Yang Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea; Nonsan Type: Postcards/Ephemera Description: A stone statue of Maitreya (Sanskrit term meaning the Merciful) Bodhisattva, located at the center of 'Gwanchoksa' Temple, and called 'Eunjin Miruk'. The Korean word Miruk signifies the Sanskrit word for Maitreya. Its height is 18.2 m, making it the largest Buddhist stone carving in Korea. It was erected in 967 AD under the rule of the 4th king Kwangjong of the Koryo dynasty and designated as the Korean national treasure #218. Kwanchoksa Temple is located in the city of Nonsan, around 120 miles southeast of Seoul, and serves as a major tourist attraction to this day. Inscription/Marks: Image imprinted with legend in Japanese characters: Pencilled inscription on verso: 'White Buddha between here & Pengyang.' Identifier: 1260.74.08.01 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xr7 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | buddhas | gwanchoksanonsansouthkorea | eunjinmiruk | temples | koryo | culturalproperty | culidentifier:value=1260740801 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier

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The Coronation Hall, Seoul, Corea

Description

Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: The Coronation Hall, Seoul, Corea Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea; Seoul Type: Postcards/Ephemera Description: Hwangu-dan, where the coronation of King 'Kojong' was held on Oct. 12, 1897, was an imperial villa. The place was used as a traditional detached palace since King 'Taejong' (reigned 1400-1418) , but it was partially demolished by the Japanese who built 'Choson' Hotel in the place. What remains today is listed as Historic Site No. 157 on the national register and still stands in the form of an octagonal pavilion called 'Hwanggungu' in the garden of the Choson Hotel in Sogong-dong, Chung-gu, Seoul. Sources: Sajin uiro ponun tongnip undong, 1996, v.1, p. 45. City Facts, Seoul Metropolitan Government, web site english.metro.seoul.kr/about/cityfacts/culture.cfm ; date accessed: May 9, 2003. Inscription/Marks: Inscription imprinted on image: 'The Coronation Hall, Seoul, Corea' Identifier: 1260.74.07.09 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xr5 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | royalpalaces | coronations | kojong | taejong | chosonhotelseoulsouthkorea | culidentifier:value=1260740709 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier

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Gesang School (i.e. kisaeng school)

Description

Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: Gesang School (i.e. kisaeng school) Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: North Korea; Pyongyang Type: Postcards/Ephemera Description: Korean kisaengs, or singing girls, dressed up for singing and dancing. Korean kisaeng is special women's occupation that exists for helping parties enjoyable by singing and dancing. Their social position was among the lowest in the traditional Korean class system. Their daughters also became kisaengs and their sons became slaves. The art of entertaining of the kisaeng is analogous to Japanese geisha. These professional entertainers were highly trained in the arts of poetry, music, dance, and other forms of social or artistic diversion. The picture is somewhat curious. It was taken in front of a modern, western-style brick building, with a very peculiar Korean screen as the backdrop. Inscription/Marks: Inscription in characters imprinted on image; pencilled inscription on verso: 'Gesang School' Identifier: 1260.74.09.02 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xr9 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | women | entertainers | singers | dancers | costume | culidentifier:value=1260740902 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier | kisaeng | korea

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Keifukukyu Palace. Old North Palace

Description

Collection: Willard Dickerman Straight and Early U.S.-Korea Diplomatic Relations, Cornell University Library Title: Keifukukyu Palace. Old North Palace Date: ca. 1904 Place: Asia: South Korea; Seoul Type: Postcards/Ephemera Description: The inscription written in Chinese characters show 'Ku hwangsong Kyongbokkung Sogyonjon' which means a study hall at C. This two-story building probably is a 'Chuhapru' (Chuhap Pavilion) which was built during the final years of King 'Yongjo' (1724-1776). The lower floor was used as the royal library while the top floor provided a place for entertainments and feasts. It is not known who the distinguished genetlemen (what appears to be Japanese flanked by two Korean) on the lower balcony are. Source: Adams, Edward B. Palaces of Seoul : Yi Dynasty palaces in Korea's capital city, 1972. P. 97. Inscription/Marks: Inscription imprinted on image: 'Keifukukyu Palace' Identifier: 1260.74.07.06 Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5xr2 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | royalpalaces | pavilions | libraries | yongjo | sogyonjonchuhaprukyongbokkungseoulsouthkorea | culidentifier:value=1260740706 | culidentifier:lunafield=identifier

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