Searching for language acquisition : 26 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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9.675 The Development of Object and Face Recognition (MIT) 9.675 The Development of Object and Face Recognition (MIT)

Description

This course takes a 'back to the beginning' view that aims to better understand the end result. What might be the developmental processes that lead to the organization of 'booming, buzzing confusions' into coherent visual objects? This course examines key experimental results and computational proposals pertinent to the discovery of objects in complex visual inputs. The structure of the course is designed to get students to learn and to focus on the genre of study as a whole; to get a feel for how science is done in this field. This course takes a 'back to the beginning' view that aims to better understand the end result. What might be the developmental processes that lead to the organization of 'booming, buzzing confusions' into coherent visual objects? This course examines key experimental results and computational proposals pertinent to the discovery of objects in complex visual inputs. The structure of the course is designed to get students to learn and to focus on the genre of study as a whole; to get a feel for how science is done in this field.

Subjects

computational theories of human cognition | computational theories of human cognition | principles of inductive learning and inference | principles of inductive learning and inference | representation of knowledge | representation of knowledge | computational frameworks | computational frameworks | Bayesian models | Bayesian models | hierarchical Bayesian models | hierarchical Bayesian models | probabilistic graphical models | probabilistic graphical models | nonparametric statistical models | nonparametric statistical models | Bayesian Occam's razor | Bayesian Occam's razor | sampling algorithms for approximate learning and inference | sampling algorithms for approximate learning and inference | probabilistic models defined over structured representations such as first-order logic | probabilistic models defined over structured representations such as first-order logic | grammars | grammars | relational schemas | relational schemas | core aspects of cognition | core aspects of cognition | concept learning | concept learning | concept categorization | concept categorization | causal reasoning | causal reasoning | theory formation | theory formation | language acquisition | language acquisition | social inference | social inference

License

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9.56J Abnormal Language (MIT) 9.56J Abnormal Language (MIT)

Description

Introduction to the linguistic study of language pathology, concentrating on experimental approaches and theoretical explanations. Discussion of Specific Language Impairment, autism, Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, normal aging, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, hemispherectomy and aphasia. Focuses on the comparison of linguistic abilities among these syndromes, while drawing clear comparisons with first and second language acquisition. Topics include the lexicon, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Relates the lost linguistic abilities in these syndromes to properties of the brain. Introduction to the linguistic study of language pathology, concentrating on experimental approaches and theoretical explanations. Discussion of Specific Language Impairment, autism, Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, normal aging, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, hemispherectomy and aphasia. Focuses on the comparison of linguistic abilities among these syndromes, while drawing clear comparisons with first and second language acquisition. Topics include the lexicon, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Relates the lost linguistic abilities in these syndromes to properties of the brain.

Subjects

linguistics | linguistics | abnormal language | abnormal language | syntax | syntax | language acquisition | language acquisition | binding theory | binding theory | finiteness | finiteness | syntactic theory | syntactic theory | language lateralization | language lateralization | hemispherectomies | hemispherectomies | aphasia | aphasia | language loss | language loss | syntactic working memory | syntactic working memory | comprehension | comprehension | Extended Optional Infinitive Stage | Extended Optional Infinitive Stage | syntactic movement | syntactic movement | animal communication | animal communication | EOI stage | EOI stage | Williams syndrome | Williams syndrome | language processing | language processing | 9.56 | 9.56 | 24.907 | 24.907

License

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9.601J Language Acquisition I (MIT) 9.601J Language Acquisition I (MIT)

Description

Lectures, reading, and discussion of current theory and data concerning the psychology and biology of language acquisition. Emphasizes learning of syntax and morphology, together with some discussion of phonology, and especially research relating grammatical theory and learnability theory to empirical studies of children. Lectures, reading, and discussion of current theory and data concerning the psychology and biology of language acquisition. Emphasizes learning of syntax and morphology, together with some discussion of phonology, and especially research relating grammatical theory and learnability theory to empirical studies of children.

Subjects

psychology | psychology | language acquisition | language acquisition | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | phonology | phonology | grammatical theory | grammatical theory | children | children | 9.601 | 9.601 | 24.949 | 24.949

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT) 9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports. Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | structure | structure | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | storage | storage | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | Ambiguity resolution | Ambiguity resolution | computational modeling | computational modeling | connectionist models | connectionist models | critical period | critical period | Speech acquisition | Speech acquisition | word acquisition | word acquisition | self-paced reading | self-paced reading | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | maging | maging | language acquisition | language acquisition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT) 24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | socio-linguistic | creole | creole | caribbean | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | spoken language acquisition | identity | identity | africa | africa | europe | europe | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | haitian | colony | colony | colonial | colonial | dialect | dialect | grench | grench | new world | new world | slavery | slavery | lexicon | lexicon | pidgin | pidgin | culture | culture | religion | religion | music | music | literature | literature | ethnicity | ethnicity | text | text | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | uniformity | uniformity | ebonics | ebonics | africal-american english | africal-american english | gullah | gullah | west indian | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT) 24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t

Subjects

linguistics | linguistics | syntax | syntax | language | language | structure | structure | theory | theory | language structure | language structure | philosophy | philosophy | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | languages | languages | syntactic theory | syntactic theory | language acquisition | language acquisition | processing | processing | Principles and Parameters syntax | Principles and Parameters syntax | theoretical linguistics | theoretical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT) 24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | socio-linguistic | creole | creole | caribbean | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | spoken language acquisition | identity | identity | africa | africa | europe | europe | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | haitian | colony | colony | colonial | colonial | dialect | dialect | grench | grench | new world | new world | slavery | slavery | lexicon | lexicon | pidgin | pidgin | culture | culture | religion | religion | music | music | literature | literature | ethnicity | ethnicity | text | text | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | uniformity | uniformity | ebonics | ebonics | africal-american english | africal-american english | gullah | gullah | west indian | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT) 9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports. Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | structure | structure | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | storage | storage | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | Ambiguity resolution | Ambiguity resolution | computational modeling | computational modeling | connectionist models | connectionist models | critical period | critical period | Speech acquisition | Speech acquisition | word acquisition | word acquisition | self-paced reading | self-paced reading | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | maging | maging | language acquisition | language acquisition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.906J The Linguistic Study of Bilingualism (MIT) 24.906J The Linguistic Study of Bilingualism (MIT)

Description

This course describes development of bilingualism in human history (from Lucy to present day). It focuses on linguistic aspects of bilingualism; models of bilingualism and language acquisition; competence versus performance; effects of bilingualism on other domains of human cognition; brain imaging studies; early versus late bilingualism; opportunities to observe and conduct original research; and implications for educational policies among others. The course is taught in English. This course describes development of bilingualism in human history (from Lucy to present day). It focuses on linguistic aspects of bilingualism; models of bilingualism and language acquisition; competence versus performance; effects of bilingualism on other domains of human cognition; brain imaging studies; early versus late bilingualism; opportunities to observe and conduct original research; and implications for educational policies among others. The course is taught in English.

Subjects

asmitasapient (1:25:08 PM): bilingualism | asmitasapient (1:25:08 PM): bilingualism | language acquisition | language acquisition | code-switching | code-switching | cognition | cognition | neuropsychologly | neuropsychologly | childhood | childhood | linguistics | linguistics | bilingualism | bilingualism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT) 24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT)

Description

This class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Throughout the course, we will be learning (in many different ways) that human language is a surprisingly intricate -- yet law-governed and fascinating mental system. In the first 2/3 of the class, we will study some core aspects of this system in detail. In the last part of the class, we will use what we have learned to address a variety of questions, including how children acquire language, ways in which languages are affected by contact with other languages, and the representation of linguistic phenomena in the brain, among others. This class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Throughout the course, we will be learning (in many different ways) that human language is a surprisingly intricate -- yet law-governed and fascinating mental system. In the first 2/3 of the class, we will study some core aspects of this system in detail. In the last part of the class, we will use what we have learned to address a variety of questions, including how children acquire language, ways in which languages are affected by contact with other languages, and the representation of linguistic phenomena in the brain, among others.

Subjects

language | language | syntax | syntax | language acquisition | language acquisition | speech | speech | writing | writing | morphology | morphology | phonetics | phonetics | linguistics | linguistics | linguistic fieldwork | linguistic fieldwork | phonology | phonology | Animal Communication | Animal Communication | semantics | semantics | Historical linguistics | Historical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT) 24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT)

Description

This core-curriculum linguistics class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Topics include the intricate system that governs language, how it is acquired, the similarities and differences among languages, and how spoken (and signed) language relates to written language, among others. This core-curriculum linguistics class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Topics include the intricate system that governs language, how it is acquired, the similarities and differences among languages, and how spoken (and signed) language relates to written language, among others.

Subjects

language | language | syntax | syntax | language acquisition | language acquisition | speech | speech | writing | writing | morphology | morphology | phonetics | phonetics | linguistics | linguistics | linguistic fieldwork | linguistic fieldwork | phonology | phonology | Animal Communication | Animal Communication | semantics | semantics | Historical linguistics | Historical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t

Subjects

linguistics | syntax | language | structure | theory | language structure | philosophy | cognitive psychology | languages | syntactic theory | language acquisition | processing | Principles and Parameters syntax | theoretical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.56J Abnormal Language (MIT)

Description

Introduction to the linguistic study of language pathology, concentrating on experimental approaches and theoretical explanations. Discussion of Specific Language Impairment, autism, Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, normal aging, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, hemispherectomy and aphasia. Focuses on the comparison of linguistic abilities among these syndromes, while drawing clear comparisons with first and second language acquisition. Topics include the lexicon, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Relates the lost linguistic abilities in these syndromes to properties of the brain.

Subjects

linguistics | abnormal language | syntax | language acquisition | binding theory | finiteness | syntactic theory | language lateralization | hemispherectomies | aphasia | language loss | syntactic working memory | comprehension | Extended Optional Infinitive Stage | syntactic movement | animal communication | EOI stage | Williams syndrome | language processing | 9.56 | 24.907

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t

Subjects

linguistics | syntax | language | structure | theory | language structure | philosophy | cognitive psychology | languages | syntactic theory | language acquisition | processing | Principles and Parameters syntax | theoretical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

language processing | structure | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | storage | Morphological processing | Ambiguity resolution | computational modeling | connectionist models | critical period | Speech acquisition | word acquisition | self-paced reading | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | maging | language acquisition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT)

Description

This core-curriculum linguistics class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Topics include the intricate system that governs language, how it is acquired, the similarities and differences among languages, and how spoken (and signed) language relates to written language, among others.

Subjects

language | syntax | language acquisition | speech | writing | morphology | phonetics | linguistics | linguistic fieldwork | phonology | Animal Communication | semantics | Historical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.906J The Linguistic Study of Bilingualism (MIT)

Description

This course describes development of bilingualism in human history (from Lucy to present day). It focuses on linguistic aspects of bilingualism; models of bilingualism and language acquisition; competence versus performance; effects of bilingualism on other domains of human cognition; brain imaging studies; early versus late bilingualism; opportunities to observe and conduct original research; and implications for educational policies among others. The course is taught in English.

Subjects

asmitasapient (1:25:08 PM): bilingualism | language acquisition | code-switching | cognition | neuropsychologly | childhood | linguistics | bilingualism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT)

Description

This class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Throughout the course, we will be learning (in many different ways) that human language is a surprisingly intricate -- yet law-governed and fascinating mental system. In the first 2/3 of the class, we will study some core aspects of this system in detail. In the last part of the class, we will use what we have learned to address a variety of questions, including how children acquire language, ways in which languages are affected by contact with other languages, and the representation of linguistic phenomena in the brain, among others.

Subjects

language | syntax | language acquisition | speech | writing | morphology | phonetics | linguistics | linguistic fieldwork | phonology | Animal Communication | semantics | Historical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.675 The Development of Object and Face Recognition (MIT)

Description

This course takes a 'back to the beginning' view that aims to better understand the end result. What might be the developmental processes that lead to the organization of 'booming, buzzing confusions' into coherent visual objects? This course examines key experimental results and computational proposals pertinent to the discovery of objects in complex visual inputs. The structure of the course is designed to get students to learn and to focus on the genre of study as a whole; to get a feel for how science is done in this field.

Subjects

computational theories of human cognition | principles of inductive learning and inference | representation of knowledge | computational frameworks | Bayesian models | hierarchical Bayesian models | probabilistic graphical models | nonparametric statistical models | Bayesian Occam's razor | sampling algorithms for approximate learning and inference | probabilistic models defined over structured representations such as first-order logic | grammars | relational schemas | core aspects of cognition | concept learning | concept categorization | causal reasoning | theory formation | language acquisition | social inference

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.56J Abnormal Language (MIT)

Description

Introduction to the linguistic study of language pathology, concentrating on experimental approaches and theoretical explanations. Discussion of Specific Language Impairment, autism, Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, normal aging, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, hemispherectomy and aphasia. Focuses on the comparison of linguistic abilities among these syndromes, while drawing clear comparisons with first and second language acquisition. Topics include the lexicon, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Relates the lost linguistic abilities in these syndromes to properties of the brain.

Subjects

linguistics | abnormal language | syntax | language acquisition | binding theory | finiteness | syntactic theory | language lateralization | hemispherectomies | aphasia | language loss | syntactic working memory | comprehension | Extended Optional Infinitive Stage | syntactic movement | animal communication | EOI stage | Williams syndrome | language processing | 9.56 | 24.907

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | creole | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | identity | africa | europe | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | colony | colonial | dialect | grench | new world | slavery | lexicon | pidgin | culture | religion | music | literature | ethnicity | text | syntax | morphology | uniformity | ebonics | africal-american english | gullah | west indian

License

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t

Subjects

linguistics | syntax | language | structure | theory | language structure | philosophy | cognitive psychology | languages | syntactic theory | language acquisition | processing | Principles and Parameters syntax | theoretical linguistics

License

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9.601J Language Acquisition I (MIT)

Description

Lectures, reading, and discussion of current theory and data concerning the psychology and biology of language acquisition. Emphasizes learning of syntax and morphology, together with some discussion of phonology, and especially research relating grammatical theory and learnability theory to empirical studies of children.

Subjects

psychology | language acquisition | syntax | morphology | phonology | grammatical theory | children | 9.601 | 24.949

License

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9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

language processing | structure | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | storage | Morphological processing | Ambiguity resolution | computational modeling | connectionist models | critical period | Speech acquisition | word acquisition | self-paced reading | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | maging | language acquisition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | creole | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | identity | africa | europe | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | colony | colonial | dialect | grench | new world | slavery | lexicon | pidgin | culture | religion | music | literature | ethnicity | text | syntax | morphology | uniformity | ebonics | africal-american english | gullah | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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