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21A.219 Law and Society (MIT) 21A.219 Law and Society (MIT)

Description

Law is a common and yet distinct aspect of everyday life in modern societies. This course examines the central features of law as a social institution and as a feature of popular culture. We will explore the nature of law as a set of social systems, central actors in the systems, legal reasoning, and the relationship of the legal form and reasoning to social change. The course emphasizes the relationship between the internal logic of legal devices and economic, political and social processes. Emphasis is placed upon developing a perspective which views law as a practical resource, a mechanism for handling the widest range of unspecified social issues, problems, and conflicts, and at the same time, as a set of shared representations and aspirations. We will explore the range Law is a common and yet distinct aspect of everyday life in modern societies. This course examines the central features of law as a social institution and as a feature of popular culture. We will explore the nature of law as a set of social systems, central actors in the systems, legal reasoning, and the relationship of the legal form and reasoning to social change. The course emphasizes the relationship between the internal logic of legal devices and economic, political and social processes. Emphasis is placed upon developing a perspective which views law as a practical resource, a mechanism for handling the widest range of unspecified social issues, problems, and conflicts, and at the same time, as a set of shared representations and aspirations. We will explore the range

Subjects

legal reasoning | legal reasoning | legal systems | legal systems | social class | social class | social change | social change | practice of law | practice of law | legal education | legal education | law and science | law and science | 11.163 | 11.163 | 17.249 | 17.249

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Privacy 3.0 - A Critical Juncture or Convenient Hype?

Description

Simon Davies (Director, Privacy International) presents an overview of the key privacy risks, especially as regards the Internet, which have emerged in the Web 3.0 era. This seminar is the first in the OxPILS series "Mending the Tangled Web? Informational Privacy 3.0". This series has been generously made possible with funding from a Joint Programme between the European Union and the Council of Europe. (The views expressed are those of the individual speakers only). The talk argued that the current data protection framework is struggling to cope with the mass and diffuse nature of data processing which has now become ubiquitous. One way forward may be to develop and entrench technology with build-in privacy protections such as cryto-algorithms at every level. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

sociology | socio-legal | law | sociolegal | Oxpils | sociology | socio-legal | law | sociolegal | Oxpils | 2011-11-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Changing law: mental capacity legislation Changing law: mental capacity legislation

Description

The aim of this free course, Changing law: mental capacity legislation, is to consider how legal problems are identified and how the law develops to address those problems. It uses the evolution of legislation on decision making for mentally incapacitated adults to explore how development of the law is achieved. Through this study of the background to, and history of, the passage of legislation relating to mental capacity, legal meaning is discussed and explored. First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Changing law: mental capacity legislation. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 The aim of this free course, Changing law: mental capacity legislation, is to consider how legal problems are identified and how the law develops to address those problems. It uses the evolution of legislation on decision making for mentally incapacitated adults to explore how development of the law is achieved. Through this study of the background to, and history of, the passage of legislation relating to mental capacity, legal meaning is discussed and explored. First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Changing law: mental capacity legislation. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Changing law: mental capacity legislation. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Changing law: mental capacity legislation. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | The Law | The Law | W820_1 | W820_1 | law | law | legal problems | legal problems | evolution of legislation | evolution of legislation | mentally incapacitated adults | mentally incapacitated adults | development of law | development of law | legal meaning | legal meaning

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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21A.219 Law and Society (MIT)

Description

Law is a common and yet distinct aspect of everyday life in modern societies. This course examines the central features of law as a social institution and as a feature of popular culture. We will explore the nature of law as a set of social systems, central actors in the systems, legal reasoning, and the relationship of the legal form and reasoning to social change. The course emphasizes the relationship between the internal logic of legal devices and economic, political and social processes. Emphasis is placed upon developing a perspective which views law as a practical resource, a mechanism for handling the widest range of unspecified social issues, problems, and conflicts, and at the same time, as a set of shared representations and aspirations. We will explore the range

Subjects

legal reasoning | legal systems | social class | social change | practice of law | legal education | law and science | 11.163 | 17.249

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.219 Law and Society (MIT)

Description

Law is a common and yet distinct aspect of everyday life in modern societies. This course examines the central features of law as a social institution and as a feature of popular culture. We will explore the nature of law as a set of social systems, central actors in the systems, legal reasoning, and the relationship of the legal form and reasoning to social change. The course emphasizes the relationship between the internal logic of legal devices and economic, political and social processes. Emphasis is placed upon developing a perspective which views law as a practical resource, a mechanism for handling the widest range of unspecified social issues, problems, and conflicts, and at the same time, as a set of shared representations and aspirations. We will explore the range

Subjects

legal reasoning | legal systems | social class | social change | practice of law | legal education | law and science | 11.163 | 17.249

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.219 Law and Society (MIT)

Description

Law is a common and yet distinct aspect of everyday life in modern societies. This course examines the central features of law as a social institution and as a feature of popular culture. We will explore the nature of law as a set of social systems, central actors in the systems, legal reasoning, and the relationship of the legal form and reasoning to social change. The course emphasizes the relationship between the internal logic of legal devices and economic, political and social processes. Emphasis is placed upon developing a perspective which views law as a practical resource, a mechanism for handling the widest range of unspecified social issues, problems, and conflicts, and at the same time, as a set of shared representations and aspirations. We will explore the range

Subjects

legal reasoning | legal systems | social class | social change | practice of law | legal education | law and science | 11.163 | 17.249

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.219 Law and Society (MIT)

Description

Law is a common and yet distinct aspect of everyday life in modern societies. This course examines the central features of law as a social institution and as a feature of popular culture. We will explore the nature of law as a set of social systems, central actors in the systems, legal reasoning, and the relationship of the legal form and reasoning to social change. The course emphasizes the relationship between the internal logic of legal devices and economic, political and social processes. Emphasis is placed upon developing a perspective which views law as a practical resource, a mechanism for handling the widest range of unspecified social issues, problems, and conflicts, and at the same time, as a set of shared representations and aspirations. We will explore the range

Subjects

legal reasoning | legal systems | social class | social change | practice of law | legal education | law and science | 11.163 | 17.249

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Keynote Speech

Description

Terry Davis, former Secretary General of the Council of Europe, gives the final keynote speech for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective conference. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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- A Dual Agenda

Description

Professor Richard Caplan, Oxford, gives a talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their governments may try to avoid 'at home'? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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From Conditionality to Disconnection-The Ambivalent Relationship between the Council of Europe and the European Union in the Field of Criminal Justice

Description

Professor Valsamis Mitsilegas, School of Law, Queen Mary, University of London gives a talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their gover Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Hard Law, Soft Law and the Politics of Standards: Regulating Political Parties in Europe

Description

Dr Daniel Smilov, University of Sofia, gives a talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their governments may try to avoid 'at home'? It Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities: From Standard-Setting to Standard-Implementation

Description

Professor Rainer Hoffmann, University of Frankfurt gives a talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their governments may try to avoid 'at Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Council of Europe and the death penalty: intergovernmental legitimation as enabling and constraining

Description

Dr Kundai Sithole, Oxford, gives the seventh talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their governments may try to avoid 'at home'? It w Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Sixty Years of Normative Production in the Council of Europe: The Legal Nature, Elaboration, Challenges and Trends of the CoE Conventions

Description

Manuel Lezertua, Director of Legal Advice and Public International Law (Jurisconsult), Council of Europe: gives the sixth talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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s Norm Entrepreneurship

Description

Dr Gwendolyn Sasse, Oxford, gives the fifth talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their governments may try to avoid 'at home'? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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War, Law and the Cold War: Making the European Convention on Human Rights

Description

Professor Anne Deighton (Oxford) gives the fourth talk in The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their governments may try to avoid 'at home'? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Where do norms come from?

Description

Dr Jennifer Jackson-Preece (LSE) gives the second talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their governments may try to avoid 'at home'? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Norm Entrepreneurship - Theoretical and Methodological Challenges

Description

Professor Jeffrey Checkel (Simon Fraser University, Vancouver), gives the first talk in The Evolution of International Norms and 'Norm Entrepreneurship' The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective workshop. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their g Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

norms | norm entrepreneurship | socio-legal | law | europe | norms | norm entrepreneurship | socio-legal | law | europe | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The legal adaptation of British settlers in Turkey

Description

Lecture by Derya Bayir, Queen Mary Univesity and Prakash Shah, GLOCUL: Centre for Culture and Law, Queen Mary, University of London. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

turkey legal | migration | turkey legal | migration

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Decisions and Turkish Code Reforms Pertaining to the Headscarf on Islamist Women in Turkey: Enabling Emancipation or Legitimizing Discrimination?

Description

Sarah Ficher, (American University), gives a talk for the Legal Reform and Political Change Affecting Women in the MENA Region held on Tuesday 12 June, 2012 in St Antony's College. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Turkey | Arab Spring | family | gender | legal reform | religion | middle east | politics | law | north africa | women | Turkey | Arab Spring | family | gender | legal reform | religion | middle east | politics | law | north africa | women

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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i.

Description

Concluding lecture from the Legal Reform and Political Change Affecting Women in the MENA Region conference by Saiyad Ahmad (American University Cairo). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

jurisprudence | i | gender | legal reform | middle east | politics | law | women | i | gender | legal reform | middle east | politics | law | women | 2012-06-12

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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