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21A.219 Law and Society (MIT) 21A.219 Law and Society (MIT)

Description

Law is a common and yet distinct aspect of everyday life in modern societies. This course examines the central features of law as a social institution and as a feature of popular culture. We will explore the nature of law as a set of social systems, central actors in the systems, legal reasoning, and the relationship of the legal form and reasoning to social change. The course emphasizes the relationship between the internal logic of legal devices and economic, political and social processes. Emphasis is placed upon developing a perspective which views law as a practical resource, a mechanism for handling the widest range of unspecified social issues, problems, and conflicts, and at the same time, as a set of shared representations and aspirations. We will explore the range Law is a common and yet distinct aspect of everyday life in modern societies. This course examines the central features of law as a social institution and as a feature of popular culture. We will explore the nature of law as a set of social systems, central actors in the systems, legal reasoning, and the relationship of the legal form and reasoning to social change. The course emphasizes the relationship between the internal logic of legal devices and economic, political and social processes. Emphasis is placed upon developing a perspective which views law as a practical resource, a mechanism for handling the widest range of unspecified social issues, problems, and conflicts, and at the same time, as a set of shared representations and aspirations. We will explore the range

Subjects

legal reasoning | legal reasoning | legal systems | legal systems | social class | social class | social change | social change | practice of law | practice of law | legal education | legal education | law and science | law and science | 11.163 | 11.163 | 17.249 | 17.249

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

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21A.219 Law and Society (MIT)

Description

Law is a common and yet distinct aspect of everyday life in modern societies. This course examines the central features of law as a social institution and as a feature of popular culture. We will explore the nature of law as a set of social systems, central actors in the systems, legal reasoning, and the relationship of the legal form and reasoning to social change. The course emphasizes the relationship between the internal logic of legal devices and economic, political and social processes. Emphasis is placed upon developing a perspective which views law as a practical resource, a mechanism for handling the widest range of unspecified social issues, problems, and conflicts, and at the same time, as a set of shared representations and aspirations. We will explore the range

Subjects

legal reasoning | legal systems | social class | social change | practice of law | legal education | law and science | 11.163 | 17.249

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allportuguesecourses.xml

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Show Trials | Great Terror | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Galileo | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Stalin | Bukharin | Scopes | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | public discussion | legal system | legal reasoning | storytelling | evidence | interpretation | law | society | social issues | public discourse | narrative | dissenters | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

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21A.219 Law and Society (MIT)

Description

Law is a common and yet distinct aspect of everyday life in modern societies. This course examines the central features of law as a social institution and as a feature of popular culture. We will explore the nature of law as a set of social systems, central actors in the systems, legal reasoning, and the relationship of the legal form and reasoning to social change. The course emphasizes the relationship between the internal logic of legal devices and economic, political and social processes. Emphasis is placed upon developing a perspective which views law as a practical resource, a mechanism for handling the widest range of unspecified social issues, problems, and conflicts, and at the same time, as a set of shared representations and aspirations. We will explore the range

Subjects

legal reasoning | legal systems | social class | social change | practice of law | legal education | law and science | 11.163 | 17.249

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

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21A.219 Law and Society (MIT)

Description

Law is a common and yet distinct aspect of everyday life in modern societies. This course examines the central features of law as a social institution and as a feature of popular culture. We will explore the nature of law as a set of social systems, central actors in the systems, legal reasoning, and the relationship of the legal form and reasoning to social change. The course emphasizes the relationship between the internal logic of legal devices and economic, political and social processes. Emphasis is placed upon developing a perspective which views law as a practical resource, a mechanism for handling the widest range of unspecified social issues, problems, and conflicts, and at the same time, as a set of shared representations and aspirations. We will explore the range

Subjects

legal reasoning | legal systems | social class | social change | practice of law | legal education | law and science | 11.163 | 17.249

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allspanishcourses.xml

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21A.219 Law and Society (MIT)

Description

Law is a common and yet distinct aspect of everyday life in modern societies. This course examines the central features of law as a social institution and as a feature of popular culture. We will explore the nature of law as a set of social systems, central actors in the systems, legal reasoning, and the relationship of the legal form and reasoning to social change. The course emphasizes the relationship between the internal logic of legal devices and economic, political and social processes. Emphasis is placed upon developing a perspective which views law as a practical resource, a mechanism for handling the widest range of unspecified social issues, problems, and conflicts, and at the same time, as a set of shared representations and aspirations. We will explore the range

Subjects

legal reasoning | legal systems | social class | social change | practice of law | legal education | law and science | 11.163 | 17.249

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Show Trials | Great Terror | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Galileo | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Stalin | Bukharin | Scopes | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | public discussion | legal system | legal reasoning | storytelling | evidence | interpretation | law | society | social issues | public discourse | narrative | dissenters | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Show Trials | Great Terror | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Galileo | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Stalin | Bukharin | Scopes | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | public discussion | legal system | legal reasoning | storytelling | evidence | interpretation | law | society | social issues | public discourse | narrative | dissenters | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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