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21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT) 21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the

Subjects

Shakespeare | Shakespeare | English Renaissance | English Renaissance | Marlowe | Marlowe | Jonson | Jonson | Webster | Webster | Ford | Ford | English Renaissance drama | English Renaissance drama | the relationship between theatre and society | the relationship between theatre and society | culture | culture | aesthetic | aesthetic | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | money | trade | and colonialism | money | trade | and colonialism | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | allegory and aesthetic form | allegory and aesthetic form | theatricality and meta-theatricality | theatricality and meta-theatricality | the private and the public | the private and the public | allegory | allegory | aesthetic form | aesthetic form | drama | drama | gender dynamics | gender dynamics | class dynamics | class dynamics | private | private | public | public | theatrically | theatrically | meta-theatrically | meta-theatrically | money | money | trade | trade | colonialism | colonialism | body | body | metaphor | metaphor | theatre | theatre | society | society | Spanish tragedy | Spanish tragedy | Hamlet | Hamlet | Jew of Malta | Jew of Malta | Alchemist | Alchemist | Duchess of Malfi | Duchess of Malfi | Broken Heart | Broken Heart | Arden of Faversham | Arden of Faversham | Witch of Edmonton | Witch of Edmonton | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Island Princess | Island Princess

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT) 21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe

Subjects

Comedy | Comedy | Drama | Drama | Writing | Writing | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Twain | Twain | Wilde | Wilde | Brecht | Brecht | Nabokov | Nabokov | Heller | Heller | Chaucer | Chaucer | Milton | Milton | Allegory | Allegory | Satire | Satire | comic | comic | funny | funny | jokes | jokes | literature | literature | tales | tales | satirical paintnigs | satirical paintnigs | films | films | comedies | comedies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.293 Lego Robotics (MIT) SP.293 Lego Robotics (MIT)

Description

LEGO® robotics uses LEGO®s as a fun tool to explore robotics, mechanical systems, electronics, and programming. This seminar is primarily a lab experience which provides students with resources to design, build, and program functional robots constructed from LEGO®s and a few other parts such as motors and sensors. LEGO® robotics uses LEGO®s as a fun tool to explore robotics, mechanical systems, electronics, and programming. This seminar is primarily a lab experience which provides students with resources to design, build, and program functional robots constructed from LEGO®s and a few other parts such as motors and sensors.

Subjects

lego | lego | robot | robot | robotics | robotics | sensors | sensors | building techniques | building techniques | motors | motors | gearing | gearing | Handyboards | Handyboards

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.293 Lego Robotics (MIT) ES.293 Lego Robotics (MIT)

Description

LEGO® robotics uses LEGO®s as a fun tool to explore robotics, mechanical systems, electronics, and programming. This seminar is primarily a lab experience which provides students with resources to design, build, and program functional robots constructed from LEGO®s and a few other parts such as motors and sensors. LEGO® robotics uses LEGO®s as a fun tool to explore robotics, mechanical systems, electronics, and programming. This seminar is primarily a lab experience which provides students with resources to design, build, and program functional robots constructed from LEGO®s and a few other parts such as motors and sensors.

Subjects

lego | lego | robot | robot | robotics | robotics | sensors | sensors | building techniques | building techniques | motors | motors | gearing | gearing | Handyboards | Handyboards

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Prince Albert's statue, Leinster Lawn Prince Albert's statue, Leinster Lawn

Description

Subjects

ireland | ireland | dublin | dublin | art | art | industry | industry | statue | statue | bronze | bronze | science | science | agriculture | agriculture | naturalhistorymuseum | naturalhistorymuseum | princealbert | princealbert | glassnegative | glassnegative | leinsterhouse | leinsterhouse | leinster | leinster | merrionstreet | merrionstreet | robertfrench | robertfrench | williamlawrence | williamlawrence | nationallibraryofireland | nationallibraryofireland | johnhenryfoley | johnhenryfoley | lawrencecollection | lawrencecollection | allegoricalsculpture | allegoricalsculpture | leinsterlawn | leinsterlawn | lawrencephotographicstudio | lawrencephotographicstudio | thelawrencephotographcollection | thelawrencephotographcollection

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Dame Street in the centre of Dublin Dame Street in the centre of Dublin

Description

Subjects

robertfrench | robertfrench | williamlawrence | williamlawrence | lawrencecollection | lawrencecollection | lawrencephotographicstudio | lawrencephotographicstudio | thelawrencephotographcollection | thelawrencephotographcollection | glassnegative | glassnegative | nationallibraryofireland | nationallibraryofireland | damestreet | damestreet | dublincity | dublincity | ireland | ireland | trinitycollege | trinitycollege | collegegreen | collegegreen | williamoforangestatue | williamoforangestatue | horsetram | horsetram | 1890s | 1890s | olivette | olivette | theatreroyal | theatreroyal | trams | trams | summer | summer | legofmuttonsleeve | legofmuttonsleeve | gigotsleeve | gigotsleeve | explore | explore

License

No known copyright restrictions

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21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the

Subjects

Shakespeare | English Renaissance | Marlowe | Jonson | Webster | Ford | English Renaissance drama | the relationship between theatre and society | culture | aesthetic | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | money | trade | and colonialism | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | allegory and aesthetic form | theatricality and meta-theatricality | the private and the public | allegory | aesthetic form | drama | gender dynamics | class dynamics | private | public | theatrically | meta-theatrically | money | trade | colonialism | body | metaphor | theatre | society | Spanish tragedy | Hamlet | Jew of Malta | Alchemist | Duchess of Malfi | Broken Heart | Arden of Faversham | Witch of Edmonton | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Island Princess

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.270 Autonomous Robot Design Competition (MIT) 6.270 Autonomous Robot Design Competition (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. 6.270 is a hands-on, learn-by-doing class, in which participants design and build a robot that will play in a competition at the end of January. The goal for the students is to design a machine that will be able to navigate its way around the playing surface, recognize other opponents, and manipulate game objects. Unlike the machines in Design and Manufacturing I (2.007), 6.270 robots are totally autonomous, so once a round begins, there is no human intervention.The goal of 6.270 is to teach students about robotic design by giving them the hardware, software, and information they need to design, build, and debug their own robot. The subject includes concepts and applications that are related to various MIT classes (e.g. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. 6.270 is a hands-on, learn-by-doing class, in which participants design and build a robot that will play in a competition at the end of January. The goal for the students is to design a machine that will be able to navigate its way around the playing surface, recognize other opponents, and manipulate game objects. Unlike the machines in Design and Manufacturing I (2.007), 6.270 robots are totally autonomous, so once a round begins, there is no human intervention.The goal of 6.270 is to teach students about robotic design by giving them the hardware, software, and information they need to design, build, and debug their own robot. The subject includes concepts and applications that are related to various MIT classes (e.g.

Subjects

lego | lego | robot | robot | soldering | soldering | contest | contest | gearboxes | gearboxes | motors | motors | sensors | sensors | c code | c code | IR LEDs | IR LEDs | shaft encoding | shaft encoding | handy board | handy board

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT) 21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This course looks at comedy in drama, novels, and films from Classical Greece to the twentieth century. Focusing on examples from Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Molière, Wilde, Chaplin, and Billy Wilder, along with theoretical contexts, the class examines comedy as a transgressive mode with revolutionary social and political implications. This is a Communications Intensive (CI) class with emphasis on discussion, and frequent, short essays. This course looks at comedy in drama, novels, and films from Classical Greece to the twentieth century. Focusing on examples from Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Molière, Wilde, Chaplin, and Billy Wilder, along with theoretical contexts, the class examines comedy as a transgressive mode with revolutionary social and political implications. This is a Communications Intensive (CI) class with emphasis on discussion, and frequent, short essays.

Subjects

humor | humor | drama | drama | narrative | narrative | genre | genre | literary history | literary history | irony | irony | comic | comic | slapstick | slapstick | satire | satire | wit | wit | trickster | trickster | allegory | allegory | transgression | transgression | social commentary | social commentary | political commentary | political commentary | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Aristophanes | Aristophanes | Moliere | Moliere | Aphra Behn | Aphra Behn | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Oscar Wilde | Oscar Wilde | Italo Calvino | Italo Calvino | Alison Bechdel | Alison Bechdel

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Arthur Miller, The Crucible Arthur Miller, The Crucible

Description

Video from the lectures by Robert Crawford and Derek Gladwin for the Repetition Compulsion theme, March 2015. Video from the lectures by Robert Crawford and Derek Gladwin for the Repetition Compulsion theme, March 2015.

Subjects

Derek Gladwin | Derek Gladwin | lecture | lecture | powerpoint | powerpoint | Repetition Compulsion | Repetition Compulsion | Rob Crawford | Rob Crawford | video | video | allegory | allegory | Arthur Miller | Arthur Miller | C20th | C20th | cold war | cold war | drama | drama | HUAC | HUAC | Joseph McCarthy | Joseph McCarthy | miller | miller | the crucible | the crucible | tragedy | tragedy | witch hunt | witch hunt

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/ca/deed.en_US

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Robust pro-poorest poverty reduction with counting measures: the anonymous case

Description

The talk explores conditions under which a poverty reduction experience is robustly more “pro-poor” than another one, in the context of counting measures of multidimensional poverty

Subjects

Gaston Yalonetzky | Jos ́e Gallegos | pro-poor | peru | poverty reduction | multidimensional poverty measure | robustness | Gaston Yalonetzky | Jos ́e Gallegos | pro-poor | peru | poverty reduction | multidimensional poverty measure | robustness | 2014-12-01

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT) 21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips. This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips.

Subjects

magic | magic | witches | witches | witchcraft | witchcraft | belief | belief | superstition | superstition | sorcery | sorcery | ghost | ghost | spirit | spirit | heaven | heaven | hell | hell | devil | devil | angel | angel | occult | occult | paranormal | paranormal | religion | religion | allegory | allegory | Bible | Bible | God | God | sin | sin | alchemy | alchemy | astrology | astrology | mystic | mystic | mysticism | mysticism | Europe | Europe | European history | European history | medieval | medieval | Renaissance | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Goethe | Goethe | Henry James | Henry James | 19th century America | 19th century America | metaphysics | metaphysics | pragmatism | pragmatism | death | death | afterlife | afterlife | soul | soul | phantom | phantom | myth | myth | spell | spell | wizard | wizard | wisdom | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT) 21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. It provides an understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten are explored, as well as readings from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. This course explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. It provides an understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten are explored, as well as readings from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural.

Subjects

21M.013 | 21M.013 | 21A.113 | 21A.113 | 21L.013 | 21L.013 | Macbeth | Macbeth | Dido and Aeneas | Dido and Aeneas | Faust | Faust | Liszt | Liszt | Berlioz | Berlioz | Murnau | Murnau | Turn of the Screw | Turn of the Screw | magic | magic | witches | witches | witchcraft | witchcraft | belief | belief | superstition | superstition | sorcery | sorcery | ghost | ghost | spirit | spirit | heaven | heaven | hell | hell | devil | devil | angel | angel | occult | occult | paranormal | paranormal | religion | religion | allegory | allegory | Bible | Bible | God | God | sin | sin | alchemy | alchemy | astrology | astrology | mystic | mystic | mysticism | mysticism | Europe | Europe | European history | European history | medieval | medieval | Renaissance | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Goethe | Goethe | Henry James | Henry James | 19th century America | 19th century America | metaphysics | metaphysics | pragmatism | pragmatism | death | death | afterlife | afterlife | soul | soul | phantom | phantom | myth | myth | spell | spell | wizard | wizard | wisdom | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Robust pro-poorest poverty reduction with counting measures: the anonymous case

Description

The talk explores conditions under which a poverty reduction experience is robustly more ?pro-poor? than another one, in the context of counting measures of multidimensional poverty Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Gaston Yalonetzky | ?e Gallegos | pro-poor | peru | poverty reduction | multidimensional poverty measure | robustness | ?e Gallegos | pro-poor | peru | poverty reduction | multidimensional poverty measure | robustness | 2014-12-01

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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ES.293 Lego Robotics (MIT)

Description

LEGO® robotics uses LEGO®s as a fun tool to explore robotics, mechanical systems, electronics, and programming. This seminar is primarily a lab experience which provides students with resources to design, build, and program functional robots constructed from LEGO®s and a few other parts such as motors and sensors.

Subjects

lego | robot | robotics | sensors | building techniques | motors | gearing | Handyboards

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Bagley Fountain

Description

Collection: A. D. White Architectural Photographs, Cornell University Library Accession Number: 15/5/3090.00203 Title: Bagley Fountain Architect: Henry Hobson Richardson (American, 1838-1886) Photograph date: ca. 1887-ca. 1895 Building Date: 1887 Location: North and Central America: United States; Michigan, Detroit Materials: albumen print Image: 5 7/8 x 7 3/4 in.; 14.9225 x 19.685 cm Provenance: Transfer from the College of Architecture, Art and Planning Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5sch There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | cityviews | urbanviews | streetscapes | fountains | operahouses | squaresopenspaces | omnibuses | carriages | horses | animals | allegory | soldiers | sailors | michigan | americancivilwar | campusmartiusdetroitmichigan | warmemorials | culidentifier:value=155309000203 | culidentifier:lunafield=accessionnumber

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Albert Memorial, Kensington Gardens

Description

Collection: A. D. White Architectural Photographs, Cornell University Library Accession Number: 15/5/3090.00987 Title: Albert Memorial, Kensington Gardens Architect: Sir George Gilbert Scott (English, 1811-1878) Memorial date: 1872-1876 Photograph date: ca. 1876-ca. 1885 Location: Europe: United Kingdom; London Materials: albumen print Image: 11 x 8 5/8 in.; 27.94 x 21.9075 cm Provenance: Gift of Andrew Dickson White Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5t3n There are no known copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | albertmemorialhydeparklondonengland | memorials | monuments | friezes | reliefsculptures | sculpture | policemen | uniforms | tophats | arts | allegory | trefoilarches | crosses | groupedcolumns | albertprinceconsortofvictoriaqueenofgreatbritain | portraits | urbanparks | culidentifier:value=155309000987 | culidentifier:lunafield=accessionnumber

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Benedikt Grndal's millennial card 1874.

Description

Collection: Icelandic and Faroese Photographs of Frederick W.W. Howell, Cornell University Library Title: Benedikt Grndal's millennial card 1874. Date: ca. 1900 Place: Iceland Medium: collodion print Repository: Fiske Icelandic Collection, Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library Accession: 1923.1.01 Description: The card celebrates the millennium of the settlement of Iceland by the first colonists in 874. URL: cidc.library.cornell.edu/howell/intro.asp Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/62hf There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell Univeristy Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | symbols | iceland | allegory | culidentifier:value=1923101 | culidentifier:lunafield=accession

License

No known copyright restrictions

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This course looks at comedy in drama, novels, and films from Classical Greece to the twentieth century. Focusing on examples from Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Molire, Wilde, Chaplin, and Billy Wilder, along with theoretical contexts, the class examines comedy as a transgressive mode with revolutionary social and political implications. This is a Communications Intensive (CI) class with emphasis on discussion, and frequent, short essays.

Subjects

humor | drama | narrative | genre | literary history | irony | comic | slapstick | satire | wit | trickster | allegory | transgression | social commentary | political commentary | William Shakespeare | Aristophanes | Moliere | Aphra Behn | Jane Austen | Mark Twain | Oscar Wilde | Italo Calvino | Alison Bechdel

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.SP.293 Lego Robotics (MIT)

Description

LEGO® robotics uses LEGO®s as a fun tool to explore robotics, mechanical systems, electronics, and programming. This seminar is primarily a lab experience which provides students with resources to design, build, and program functional robots constructed from LEGO®s and a few other parts such as motors and sensors.

Subjects

lego | robot | robotics | sensors | building techniques | motors | gearing | Handyboards

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Columbus, Ohio. McKinley Memorial, Side View

Description

Collection: A. D. White Architectural Photographs, Cornell University Library Accession Number: 15/5/3090.01558 Title: Columbus, Ohio. McKinley Memorial, Side View Sculptor: Herman Atkins McNeil (American, 1866-1947) Architect: Austin W. Lord (American, 1860-1922) Sculpture Date: 1903-1906 Photograph date: ca. 1906-ca. 1915 Location: North and Central America: United States; Ohio, Columbus Materials: gelatin silver print Image: 20.9843 x 16.9291 in.; 53.3 x 43 cm Provenance: Transfer from the College of Architecture, Art and Planning Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5ts9 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | mckinleymemorialcolumbusohio | memorials | monuments | sculpture | steps | cityviews | allegory | culidentifier:value=155309001558 | culidentifier:lunafield=accessionnumber

License

No known copyright restrictions

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe

Subjects

Comedy | Drama | Writing | Shakespeare | Twain | Wilde | Brecht | Nabokov | Heller | Chaucer | Milton | Allegory | Satire | comic | funny | jokes | literature | tales | satirical paintnigs | films | comedies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Jane Thompson alias Gordon, arrested for stealing a pair of boots

Description

Name: Jane Thompson alias Gordon Arrested for: Thief Arrested at: North Shields Police Station Arrested on: 13th July 1904 Tyne and Wear Archives ref: DX1388-1-35-Jane Thompson AKA Gordon These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne & Wear Archives (TWA ref DX1388/1). (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk.

Subjects

victorian | edwardian | criminals | villains | prisoners | jail | tyne | wear | archives | 1900?s | 1902 | 1903 | 1904 | 1905 | 1906 | photography | female | custody | discovery | museum | portrait | sentence | crime | larceny | theft | northshields | janethompson | mugshot | blackandwhite | monochrome | bw | tynewear | tyneweararchivesmuseums | prisoner | northshieldspolicecourt | gordon | legofmuttonsleeves

License

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips.

Subjects

magic | witches | witchcraft | belief | superstition | sorcery | ghost | spirit | heaven | hell | devil | angel | occult | paranormal | religion | allegory | Bible | God | sin | alchemy | astrology | mystic | mysticism | Europe | European history | medieval | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Goethe | Henry James | 19th century America | metaphysics | pragmatism | death | afterlife | soul | phantom | myth | spell | wizard | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. It provides an understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten are explored, as well as readings from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural.

Subjects

21M.013 | 21A.113 | 21L.013 | Macbeth | Dido and Aeneas | Faust | Liszt | Berlioz | Murnau | Turn of the Screw | magic | witches | witchcraft | belief | superstition | sorcery | ghost | spirit | heaven | hell | devil | angel | occult | paranormal | religion | allegory | Bible | God | sin | alchemy | astrology | mystic | mysticism | Europe | European history | medieval | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Goethe | Henry James | 19th century America | metaphysics | pragmatism | death | afterlife | soul | phantom | myth | spell | wizard | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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