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17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations. This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations.

Subjects

21st century | 21st century | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | realism | realism | liberalism | liberalism | institutionalism | institutionalism | constructivism | constructivism | conflict | conflict | war | war | globalization | globalization | critical analysis | critical analysis | theoretical assumptions | theoretical assumptions | analytical structures | analytical structures | comparative analysis | comparative analysis | neo-realism | neo-realism | neo-liberalism | neo-liberalism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | contentions | contentions | environmentalism | environmentalism | emergent dynamics | emergent dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | warfare | warfare | transformations | transformations | structures | structures | processes | processes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations. This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations.

Subjects

21st century | 21st century | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | realism | realism | liberalism | liberalism | institutionalism | institutionalism | constructivism | constructivism | conflict | conflict | war | war | globalization | globalization | critical analysis | critical analysis | theoretical assumptions | theoretical assumptions | analytical structures | analytical structures | comparative analysis | comparative analysis | neo-realism | neo-realism | neo-liberalism | neo-liberalism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | contentions | contentions | environmentalism | environmentalism | emergent dynamics | emergent dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | warfare | warfare | transformations | transformations | structures | structures | processes | processes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations.

Subjects

21st century | political theory | international relations | realism | liberalism | institutionalism | constructivism | conflict | war | globalization | critical analysis | theoretical assumptions | analytical structures | comparative analysis | neo-realism | neo-liberalism | neo-institutionalism | contentions | environmentalism | emergent dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | warfare | transformations | structures | processes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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: Where do we find ourselves now?

Description

Professor Abdou Filali-Ansary gives a lecture for the Humanitas lecture series on Interfaith Studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

interfaith | religion | humanitas | liberalism | interfaith | religion | humanitas | liberalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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24.04J Justice (MIT) 24.04J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the ideal of social justice. What makes a society just? We will approach this question by studying three opposing theories of justice—utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism—each foundational to contemporary political thought and discourse. This course explores the ideal of social justice. What makes a society just? We will approach this question by studying three opposing theories of justice—utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism—each foundational to contemporary political thought and discourse.

Subjects

social justice | social justice | liberty | liberty | equality | equality | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | entitlement | entitlement | immigration | immigration | fairness | fairness | ghetto poor | ghetto poor | global poor | global poor | principles | principles | moral desert | moral desert | welfare contractualism | welfare contractualism | G.A. Cohen | G.A. Cohen | Jeremy Bentham | Jeremy Bentham | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | Robert Nozick | Robert Nozick | Milton Friedman | Milton Friedman

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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: Where do we find ourselves now?

Description

Professor Abdou Filali-Ansary gives a lecture for the Humanitas lecture series on Interfaith Studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

interfaith | religion | humanitas | liberalism | interfaith | religion | humanitas | liberalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Neoliberalism, Trade Unions and the Labour Market: An overview of the core ideological claims

Description

Ben Jackson, Associate Professor & Tutorial Fellow in Modern History, Faculty of History & University College, Oxford University, gives a talk at the Neoliberalism, Employment and the Law workshop at Wolfson College, Oxford. Dr Jackson questioned what was distinctive about the neoliberal understanding of labour and traced the various dimensions of this radical ideological innovation, encompassing neoliberals? understanding of the economic relationship between trade unions and employment, inequality and inflation; of the distinction between the state and civil society; and ultimately the neoliberal attempt to dissolve the language of class altogether through the sponsorship of alternative discourses about ?human capital? and producer and consumer interests. This talk was given at the Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

trade unions | labour market | law | regulation | Employment | legal | neoliberalism | justice | society | trade unions | labour market | law | regulation | Employment | legal | neoliberalism | justice | society | 2015-11-19

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Neoliberalism as Analytical Starting Point: Possibilities and Problems

Description

Introduced by Dr Amir Paz-Fuchs, Dr Eagleton-Pierce examines neoliberalism from an international political economy perspective. He looks at a wide range of uses of the term ?neoliberalism? and stated ?it can sometimes appear as a kind of conceptual Swiss Army knife which can unpick and cut through almost any argument concerning the modern world?. This talk was given at the Neoliberalism, Employment and the Law workshop at Wolfson College,Oxford, hosted the Foundation for Law, Justice and Society in November 2015. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

regulation | law | neoliberalism | political economy | regulation | law | neoliberalism | political economy | 2015-11-19

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Neoliberal Construction of Modern Slavery: The Case of Migrant Domestic Workers

Description

Judy Fudge, Professor of Law, Kent Law School, University of Kent examines Modern Slavery as a causal effect of the emphasis on human trafficking, anti-immigration and criminal law rather than employment law for migrant domestic workers. Professor Fudge examines Modern Slavery as a causal effect of the emphasis on human trafficking, anti-immigration and criminal law rather than employment law for migrant domestic workers at the Neoliberalism, Employment and the Law workshop at Wolfson College, Oxford, hosted the Foundation for Law, Justice and Society in November 2015. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

policy | migration | immigration | domestic workers | modern slavery | neoliberalism | migrant | abuse | law | regulation | Employment | legal | policy | migration | immigration | domestic workers | modern slavery | neoliberalism | migrant | abuse | law | regulation | Employment | legal | 2015-11-19

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Neoliberalism Workshop: Contradictions in liberal reforms: The regulation of labour subcontracting

Description

Guy Mundlak, Professor at The Buchmann Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University, gives a talk for the Neoliberalism workshop. Professor Mundlak outlined the legal problems, and the principle of residual responsibility associated with the triangular relationship between the worker, the (sub-contracted) provider of the service and the direct employer. Although conducted as empirical research on temporary and sub-contracted workers in Israel, he argued that the study?s findings could be seen as a prophecy of what is currently happening worldwide in terms of employer liability and workers? rights. This talk was given at the Neoliberalism, Employment and the Law workshop at Wolfson College, Oxford, hosted the Foundation for Law, Justice and Society in November 2015. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

policy | subcontracting | workers | unions | rights | neoliberalism | migrant | abuse | law | regulation | Employment | legal | policy | subcontracting | workers | unions | rights | neoliberalism | migrant | abuse | law | regulation | Employment | legal | 2015-11-19

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Soft News, Hard Sell: Journalism in Neo-Liberal India

Description

Daya Thussu, Professor of International Communication and Co-Director of India Media Centre, University of Westminster, gives a talk for the Reuters Institute of Journalism on 9th March, 2011. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

cricket | neo-liberalism | journalism | news channels | india | news | bollywood | cricket | neo-liberalism | journalism | news channels | india | news | bollywood | 2011-03-09

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations.

Subjects

21st century | political theory | international relations | realism | liberalism | institutionalism | constructivism | conflict | war | globalization | critical analysis | theoretical assumptions | analytical structures | comparative analysis | neo-realism | neo-liberalism | neo-institutionalism | contentions | environmentalism | emergent dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | warfare | transformations | structures | processes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.01J Justice (MIT) 17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered. This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered.

Subjects

just society | just society | values of liberty | values of liberty | equality | equality | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | moral-political controversy | moral-political controversy | sexual morality | sexual morality | financing schools and elections | financing schools and elections | religious liberty | religious liberty | labor markets | labor markets | health care | health care | affirmative action | affirmative action | abortion | abortion | global justice | global justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Global Liberal Order and its Future

Description

On 24 January 2014, the Centre for International Studies hosted a workshop on 'The Global Liberal Order and its Future' that explored the current shift of power and influence between nations that is taking place globally. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

global order | liberalism | soft power | global order | liberalism | soft power | 2014-01-24

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.01J Justice (MIT) 17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three broad questions about the values of liberty and equality and their place in a just society:Which liberties must a just society protect? Freedom of expression? Sexual liberty? Economic liberty? Political liberty?What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? Equality of opportunity? Of economic outcome? Political equality?Can a society ensure both liberty and equality? Or are these warring political values?We will approach these questions by examining answers to them provided by three contemporary theories of justice: utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism. To clarify these theories, and assess their strengths and weaknesses, we will discuss their implications for some issues about liberty and equality that are topics of current controver This course explores three broad questions about the values of liberty and equality and their place in a just society:Which liberties must a just society protect? Freedom of expression? Sexual liberty? Economic liberty? Political liberty?What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? Equality of opportunity? Of economic outcome? Political equality?Can a society ensure both liberty and equality? Or are these warring political values?We will approach these questions by examining answers to them provided by three contemporary theories of justice: utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism. To clarify these theories, and assess their strengths and weaknesses, we will discuss their implications for some issues about liberty and equality that are topics of current controver

Subjects

John Stewart Mill | John Stewart Mill | | Jeremy Bentham | | | Jeremy Bentham | | Jeremy Bentham | Jeremy Bentham | justice | justice | abortion | abortion | supreme court | supreme court | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | 17.01 | 17.01 | 24.04 | 24.04

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.100J Political Economy I (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | theories | theories | liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | political economy | political economy | political liberalism | political liberalism | individualism | individualism | neo-classical economics | neo-classical economics | Marxism | Marxism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Neoliberalism workshop: Implications for future visions of work and organisation

Description

Richard White, Senior Lecturer in Economic Geography, Sheffield Hallam University, gives a talk for the Neoliberalism, Employment and the Law workshop at Wolfson College, Oxford, hosted the Foundation for Law, Justice and Society in November 2015. Dr White examined how we can value and harness alternative work practices in a neoliberal society. He challenged the negativity associated with neoliberalism as a label and argued that decentralisation of capitalism could be harnessed to help us think differently about social justice and empowerment in our everyday spaces and lives. He said understanding the pervasive nature of non-commodified work practices promoted greater awareness around ?alternative?, non-capitalist spaces within the advanced economies of the western world. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

trade unions | labour market | law | regulation | Employment | legal | neoliberalism | justice | society | trade unions | labour market | law | regulation | Employment | legal | neoliberalism | justice | society | 2015-11-19

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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14.72 Capitalism and Its Critics (MIT) 14.72 Capitalism and Its Critics (MIT)

Description

This course addresses the evolution of the modern capitalist economy and evaluates its current structure and performance. Various paradigms of economics are contrasted and compared (neoclassical, Marxist, socioeconomic, and neocorporate) in order to understand how modern capitalism has been shaped and how it functions in today's economy. The course stresses general analytic reasoning and problem formulation rather than specific analytic techniques. Readings include classics in economic thought as well as contemporary analyses. This course addresses the evolution of the modern capitalist economy and evaluates its current structure and performance. Various paradigms of economics are contrasted and compared (neoclassical, Marxist, socioeconomic, and neocorporate) in order to understand how modern capitalism has been shaped and how it functions in today's economy. The course stresses general analytic reasoning and problem formulation rather than specific analytic techniques. Readings include classics in economic thought as well as contemporary analyses.

Subjects

capitalism | capitalism | markets | markets | Thomas Kuhn | Thomas Kuhn | scientific paradigm | scientific paradigm | liberalism | liberalism | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | Marxism | Marxism | corporate state | corporate state | social embeddedness | social embeddedness | economic activity | economic activity | The Fountainhead | The Fountainhead | Ayn Rand | Ayn Rand | Double Helix | Double Helix | James Watson | James Watson | Tracy Kidder | Tracy Kidder | Soul of the New Machine | Soul of the New Machine | industrial state | industrial state | individualism | individualism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.100J Political Economy I (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | theories | theories | liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | political economy | political economy | political liberalism | political liberalism | individualism | individualism | neo-classical economics | neo-classical economics | Marxism | Marxism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.346 Topics in Modern French Literature and Culture: North America Through French Eyes (MIT) 21G.346 Topics in Modern French Literature and Culture: North America Through French Eyes (MIT)

Description

This course offers an analysis of the keen interest shown by France and the French in North American cultures since the eighteenth century. Not only did France contribute to the construction of both Canadian and American nations but also it has constantly delineated its identity by way of praising or criticizing North American cultures. Taught in French. This course offers an analysis of the keen interest shown by France and the French in North American cultures since the eighteenth century. Not only did France contribute to the construction of both Canadian and American nations but also it has constantly delineated its identity by way of praising or criticizing North American cultures. Taught in French.

Subjects

France | France | North America | North America | Canada | Canada | United States | United States | liberalism | liberalism | entertainment | entertainment | media | media | trade | trade | cultural goods | cultural goods | transatlantic intellectual encounters | transatlantic intellectual encounters | translation | translation | Tocqueville | Tocqueville | Céline | Céline | Beauvoir | Beauvoir | Dubois | Dubois | Tati | Tati | Chomet | Chomet | anti-globalization | anti-globalization | Barack Obama | Barack Obama | Hergé | Hergé | Tintin | Tintin | de Tocqueville | de Tocqueville | de Gaulle | de Gaulle | Victor Hugo | Victor Hugo | Sarkozy | Sarkozy | Baudrillard | Baudrillard | Simone de Beauvoir | Simone de Beauvoir | Sartre | Sartre | Stuart Hall | Stuart Hall

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Politics, power and political economy in Latin America Politics, power and political economy in Latin America

Description

Dr Motta's research focus is the politics of subaltern resistance, with particular reference to Latin America. Dr Motta's research focus is the politics of subaltern resistance, with particular reference to Latin America. This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module explores and analyses democratic politics in Latin America since the third wave of democratization in the 1980s. It is divided into three parts: 1. Conceptualising democracy in the region with a focus on the debate between those who argue that liberal democracy and liberal markets are necessary and desirable and those who argue that only experiments that go beyond both will truly democratise the region. 2. Explaining problems in democratic development such as lack of participation, representation and citizenship with reference to the political economy of neoliberalism, dependent development and political culture, amongst other theories. 3. Asking the qu This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module explores and analyses democratic politics in Latin America since the third wave of democratization in the 1980s. It is divided into three parts: 1. Conceptualising democracy in the region with a focus on the debate between those who argue that liberal democracy and liberal markets are necessary and desirable and those who argue that only experiments that go beyond both will truly democratise the region. 2. Explaining problems in democratic development such as lack of participation, representation and citizenship with reference to the political economy of neoliberalism, dependent development and political culture, amongst other theories. 3. Asking the qu

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Module Code: M13098 | Module Code: M13098 | politics and international relations | politics and international relations | conceptualising democracy | conceptualising democracy | liberal democracy | liberal democracy | liberal markets | liberal markets | democratic development | democratic development | citizenship | citizenship | political economy | political economy | neoliberalism | neoliberalism

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21G.068J The Invention of French Theory: A History of Transatlantic Intellectual Life since 1945 (MIT) 21G.068J The Invention of French Theory: A History of Transatlantic Intellectual Life since 1945 (MIT)

Description

In the decades following the Second World War, a cluster of extraordinary French thinkers were widely translated and read in American universities. Their works were soon labeled as "French Theory." Why would sharing the same nationality make authors such as Lacan, Cixous, Derrida, Foucault or Debord, ambassadors of a specifically "French" theory? The course will explore the maze of transatlantic intellectual debates since 1945 and the heyday of French existentialism. We will study the debates on communism, decolonization, neo‐liberalism, gender, youth culture and mass media. This course is taught in English. In the decades following the Second World War, a cluster of extraordinary French thinkers were widely translated and read in American universities. Their works were soon labeled as "French Theory." Why would sharing the same nationality make authors such as Lacan, Cixous, Derrida, Foucault or Debord, ambassadors of a specifically "French" theory? The course will explore the maze of transatlantic intellectual debates since 1945 and the heyday of French existentialism. We will study the debates on communism, decolonization, neo‐liberalism, gender, youth culture and mass media. This course is taught in English.

Subjects

21G.068 | 21G.068 | WGS.234 | WGS.234 | French Theory | French Theory | postcolonial France | postcolonial France | existentialism | existentialism | Lacan | Lacan | Camus | Camus | Sartre | Sartre | Debord | Debord | Foucault | Foucault | Derrida | Derrida | Barthes | Barthes | Bourdieu | Bourdieu | Lyotard | Lyotard | Simone de Beauvoir | Simone de Beauvoir | Eribon | Eribon | Blanchot | Blanchot | Franz Fanon | Franz Fanon | neo-liberalism | neo-liberalism | gender | gender | communism | communism

License

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Conclusions: What have we learned? What should be done next?

Description

Stephen Whitefield, head of the Department of Politics and International Relations, draws some conclusions from the Volcano symposium: a series of talks discussing the causes of and possible solutions to the current global crisis. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

economic neoliberalism | volcano symposium | end of history | global crisis | stephen whitefield | economic neoliberalism | volcano symposium | end of history | global crisis | stephen whitefield

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Introduction to the Volcano symposium

Description

Stephen Whitefield, head of the Department of Politics and International Relations, gives an introduction to the Volcano symposium: a series of talks discussing the causes of and possible solutions to the current global crisis. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

end of history | whitefield | economic neoliberalism | volcano symposium | stephen | global crisis | end of history | whitefield | economic neoliberalism | volcano symposium | stephen | global crisis

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Liberalism and Historical Injustice

Description

Jennifer Page, graduate student at Harvard, delivers a talk for the Inaugural Oxford Graduate Conference in Political Theory. The conference theme was Political Theory and the Liberal Tradition. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

jennifer page | historical injustice | liberalism | jennifer page | historical injustice | liberalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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