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7.2 Different Concepts of Freedom

Description

Part 7.2. Looks at Hobbes' and Hume's views of free will and the three concepts of freedom, and considers the idea of moral responsibility as dependent on free will. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

moral responsibility | libertarianism | philosophy | choice | compatibalism | hobbes | free will | ethics | freedom determinism | hume | moral responsibility | libertarianism | philosophy | choice | compatibalism | hobbes | free will | ethics | freedom determinism | hume

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7.3 Hume on Liberty and Necessity

Description

Part 7.3. Looks at Hume's views on liberty and its relationship to causal necessity; that we have free will but it is causally determined. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

freedom | libertarianism | philosophy | necessity | free will | determinism | causal | hume | freedom | libertarianism | philosophy | necessity | free will | determinism | causal | hume

License

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7.2 Different Concepts of Freedom

Description

Part 7.2. Looks at Hobbes' and Hume's views of free will and the three concepts of freedom, and considers the idea of moral responsibility as dependent on free will. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

moral responsibility | libertarianism | philosophy | choice | compatibalism | hobbes | free will | ethics | freedom determinism | hume | moral responsibility | libertarianism | philosophy | choice | compatibalism | hobbes | free will | ethics | freedom determinism | hume

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.3 Hume on Liberty and Necessity

Description

Part 7.3. Looks at Hume's views on liberty and its relationship to causal necessity; that we have free will but it is causally determined. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

freedom | libertarianism | philosophy | necessity | free will | determinism | causal | hume | freedom | libertarianism | philosophy | necessity | free will | determinism | causal | hume

License

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24.04J Justice (MIT) 24.04J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the ideal of social justice. What makes a society just? We will approach this question by studying three opposing theories of justice—utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism—each foundational to contemporary political thought and discourse. This course explores the ideal of social justice. What makes a society just? We will approach this question by studying three opposing theories of justice—utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism—each foundational to contemporary political thought and discourse.

Subjects

social justice | social justice | liberty | liberty | equality | equality | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | entitlement | entitlement | immigration | immigration | fairness | fairness | ghetto poor | ghetto poor | global poor | global poor | principles | principles | moral desert | moral desert | welfare contractualism | welfare contractualism | G.A. Cohen | G.A. Cohen | Jeremy Bentham | Jeremy Bentham | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | Robert Nozick | Robert Nozick | Milton Friedman | Milton Friedman

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.181 Libertarianism in History (MIT) 21H.181 Libertarianism in History (MIT)

Description

This course explores the history of the ideal of personal freedom with an eye towards contemporary debates over the pros and cons of the regulatory state. The first part of the course surveys the sociological and theological sources of the concepts of freedom and civil society, and introduces liberty's leading relatives or competitors: property, equality, community, and republicanism. The second part consists of a series of case studies in the rise of modern liberty and libertarianism: the abolition of slavery, the struggle for religious freedom, and the twentieth-century American civil liberties movement. In the last part of the course, we take up debates over the role of libertarianism vs. the regulatory state in a variety of contexts: counter-terrorism, health care, the financial This course explores the history of the ideal of personal freedom with an eye towards contemporary debates over the pros and cons of the regulatory state. The first part of the course surveys the sociological and theological sources of the concepts of freedom and civil society, and introduces liberty's leading relatives or competitors: property, equality, community, and republicanism. The second part consists of a series of case studies in the rise of modern liberty and libertarianism: the abolition of slavery, the struggle for religious freedom, and the twentieth-century American civil liberties movement. In the last part of the course, we take up debates over the role of libertarianism vs. the regulatory state in a variety of contexts: counter-terrorism, health care, the financial

Subjects

libertarianism | libertarianism | history | history | politics | politics | state | state | regulatory state | regulatory state | freedom | freedom | property | property | equality | equality | community | community | republicanism | republicanism | liberty | liberty | slavery | slavery | religious freedom | religious freedom | civil liberties | civil liberties | counter-terrorism | counter-terrorism | health care | health care | financial market | financial market | the internet | the internet | Rawls | Rawls | Nozick | Nozick | Obamacare | Obamacare | Rand Paul | Rand Paul | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | de Toqueville | de Toqueville | economic good | economic good | Martin Luther King | Martin Luther King | capitalism | capitalism | John Locke | John Locke | distributive justice | distributive justice | communitarianism | communitarianism | civil republicanism | civil republicanism | chattel | chattel | Freedom Principle | Freedom Principle | antislavery | antislavery | First Amendment | First Amendment | free exercise | free exercise | religious accomodation | religious accomodation | phone surveillance | phone surveillance | private regulation | private regulation | Aaron Swartz | Aaron Swartz | Guerilla Open Access Manifesto | Guerilla Open Access Manifesto

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.01J Justice (MIT) 17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered. This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered.

Subjects

just society | just society | values of liberty | values of liberty | equality | equality | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | moral-political controversy | moral-political controversy | sexual morality | sexual morality | financing schools and elections | financing schools and elections | religious liberty | religious liberty | labor markets | labor markets | health care | health care | affirmative action | affirmative action | abortion | abortion | global justice | global justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.01J Justice (MIT) 17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three broad questions about the values of liberty and equality and their place in a just society:Which liberties must a just society protect? Freedom of expression? Sexual liberty? Economic liberty? Political liberty?What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? Equality of opportunity? Of economic outcome? Political equality?Can a society ensure both liberty and equality? Or are these warring political values?We will approach these questions by examining answers to them provided by three contemporary theories of justice: utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism. To clarify these theories, and assess their strengths and weaknesses, we will discuss their implications for some issues about liberty and equality that are topics of current controver This course explores three broad questions about the values of liberty and equality and their place in a just society:Which liberties must a just society protect? Freedom of expression? Sexual liberty? Economic liberty? Political liberty?What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? Equality of opportunity? Of economic outcome? Political equality?Can a society ensure both liberty and equality? Or are these warring political values?We will approach these questions by examining answers to them provided by three contemporary theories of justice: utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism. To clarify these theories, and assess their strengths and weaknesses, we will discuss their implications for some issues about liberty and equality that are topics of current controver

Subjects

John Stewart Mill | John Stewart Mill | | Jeremy Bentham | | | Jeremy Bentham | | Jeremy Bentham | Jeremy Bentham | justice | justice | abortion | abortion | supreme court | supreme court | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | 17.01 | 17.01 | 24.04 | 24.04

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three broad questions about the values of liberty and equality and their place in a just society:Which liberties must a just society protect? Freedom of expression? Sexual liberty? Economic liberty? Political liberty?What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? Equality of opportunity? Of economic outcome? Political equality?Can a society ensure both liberty and equality? Or are these warring political values?We will approach these questions by examining answers to them provided by three contemporary theories of justice: utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism. To clarify these theories, and assess their strengths and weaknesses, we will discuss their implications for some issues about liberty and equality that are topics of current controver

Subjects

John Stewart Mill | | Jeremy Bentham | | Jeremy Bentham | justice | abortion | supreme court | utilitarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | 17.01 | 24.04

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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General Philosophy

Description

A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. The lectures comprise the 8-week General Philosophy course and were delivered in late 2009.

Subjects

simple-podcasting | tpi3 | philosophy | millican | slides | powerpoint | checked1 | identity | locke | hume | mind | body | waismann | parfit | reid | memory | ancestral relations | sorites argument | leibniz | free will | determinism | sentimentalism | freedom | moral responsibility | libertarianism | necessity | causal | freedom determinism | choice | hobbes | compatibalism | ethics | frankfurt | perception | realism | idealism | phenomenalism | austin | strawson | berkeley | knowledge | boyle | ayer | peception | dualism | descartes | scepticism | skepticism | truth | ryle | meditations | induction | experience | reason | reichenbach | mellor | primary qualities | secondary qualities | ideas | epistemology | belief | putnam | gettier | moore | infinite regress | logic | external world | kant | immanuel kant | history | david hume | malebranche | god | causation | empiricism | rationalism | human understanding | treatise | government | corpuscularian | corpuscles | mathematics | atoms | science | newton | gravity | physics | civil war | leviathan | materialism | aristotle | renaissance | astronomy | society | religion | christianity | galileo | plato | stoics | epicureans | middle ages | aquinas | ontology | he - historical and philosophical studies | v500 | v380 | v511 | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.2 Different Concepts of Freedom

Description

Part 7.2. Looks at Hobbes' and Hume's views of free will and the three concepts of freedom, and considers the idea of moral responsibility as dependent on free will.

Subjects

philosophy | free will | freedom determinism | choice | hobbes | compatibalism | ethics | libertarianism | hume | moral responsibility | ukoer | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.3 Hume on Liberty and Necessity

Description

Part 7.3. Looks at Hume's views on liberty and its relationship to causal necessity; that we have free will but it is causally determined.

Subjects

philosophy | free will | determinism | freedom | libertarianism | hume | necessity | causal | ukoer | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Moral and Political Philosophy

Description

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and methods of moral and political philosophy. Its primary focus is on the development of moral reasoning skills and the application of those skills to contemporary social and political issues. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Philosophy 103)

Subjects

ethics | morality | intuition | consequentialism | utilitarianism | jeremy bentham | john stuart mill | libertarianism | free market | milton friedman | john locke | individual right | immanuel kant | feminist perspectives | reproductive rights | john rawls | social contract | justice | difference principle | affirmative action | profiling | virtue | disability | marriage | patriotism | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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General Philosophy

Description

A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. The lectures comprise the 8-week General Philosophy course and were delivered in late 2009.

Subjects

simple-podcasting | tpi3 | philosophy | identity | locke | hume | mind | body | waismann | parfit | checked1 | reid | memory | ancestral relations | sorites argument | leibniz | millican | slides | powerpoint | free will | determinism | sentimentalism | freedom | moral responsibility | libertarianism | necessity | causal | freedom determinism | choice | hobbes | compatibalism | ethics | frankfurt | perception | realism | idealism | phenomenalism | austin | strawson | berkeley | knowledge | boyle | ayer | peception | dualism | descartes | scepticism | skepticism | truth | meditations | induction | experience | reason | reichenbach | mellor | primary qualities | secondary qualities | ideas | epistemology | belief | putnam | gettier | moore | infinite regress | ryle | kant | immanuel kant | history | david hume | 1 | malebranche | god | causation | empiricism | rationalism | human understanding | treatise | government | corpuscularian | corpuscles | mathematics | atoms | science | newton | gravity | physics | civil war | leviathan | materialism | aristotle | renaissance | astronomy | society | religion | christianity | galileo | plato | stoics | epicureans | middle ages | aquinas | ontology | logic | external world | vertical scepticism | horizontal scepticism | he - historical and philosophical studies | v500 | v380 | v511 | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Contemporary Political Thought

Description

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the major political theorists and their work from the 18th century to the present. Common themes seen in contemporary political thought include governance, property ownership and redistribution, free enterprise, individual liberty, justice, and responsibility for the common welfare. The student will read the works of theorists advocating capitalism, socialism, communism, egalitarianism, utilitarianism, social contract theory, liberalism, conservatism, neo-liberalism, neo-conservatism, libertarianism, fascism, anarchy, rational choice theory, and globalism. By studying the evolving constructs of political theory in the past two centuries, the student will gain insight into different approaches that leaders use to so

Subjects

political thought | political theory | political philosophy | political science | sovereignty | government | democracy | civil liberties | capitalism | utilitarianism | marxism | communism | authoritarianism | fascism | libertarianism | neoliberalism | globalization | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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24.04J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the ideal of social justice. What makes a society just? We will approach this question by studying three opposing theories of justice—utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism—each foundational to contemporary political thought and discourse.

Subjects

social justice | liberty | equality | utilitarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | entitlement | immigration | fairness | ghetto poor | global poor | principles | moral desert | welfare contractualism | G.A. Cohen | Jeremy Bentham | John Stuart Mill | Robert Nozick | Milton Friedman

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.2 Different Concepts of Freedom

Description

Part 7.2. Looks at Hobbes' and Hume's views of free will and the three concepts of freedom, and considers the idea of moral responsibility as dependent on free will.

Subjects

philosophy | free will | freedom determinism | choice | hobbes | compatibalism | ethics | libertarianism | hume | moral responsibility | ukoer | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.3 Hume on Liberty and Necessity

Description

Part 7.3. Looks at Hume's views on liberty and its relationship to causal necessity; that we have free will but it is causally determined.

Subjects

philosophy | free will | determinism | freedom | libertarianism | hume | necessity | causal | ukoer | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.181 Libertarianism in History (MIT)

Description

This course explores the history of the ideal of personal freedom with an eye towards contemporary debates over the pros and cons of the regulatory state. The first part of the course surveys the sociological and theological sources of the concepts of freedom and civil society, and introduces liberty's leading relatives or competitors: property, equality, community, and republicanism. The second part consists of a series of case studies in the rise of modern liberty and libertarianism: the abolition of slavery, the struggle for religious freedom, and the twentieth-century American civil liberties movement. In the last part of the course, we take up debates over the role of libertarianism vs. the regulatory state in a variety of contexts: counter-terrorism, health care, the financial

Subjects

libertarianism | history | politics | state | regulatory state | freedom | property | equality | community | republicanism | liberty | slavery | religious freedom | civil liberties | counter-terrorism | health care | financial market | the internet | Rawls | Nozick | Obamacare | Rand Paul | John Stuart Mill | de Toqueville | economic good | Martin Luther King | capitalism | John Locke | distributive justice | communitarianism | civil republicanism | chattel | Freedom Principle | antislavery | First Amendment | free exercise | religious accomodation | phone surveillance | private regulation | Aaron Swartz | Guerilla Open Access Manifesto

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Professor Dahrendorf presenting Professor F. A Hayek with a Commemorative Plate, 1981

Description

Plate given at the lecture 'The Flow of Goods and Sevices' on the occasion of the golden jubilee of Professor Hayek's first lecture at LSE IMAGELIBRARY/98 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

Subjects

friedrichhayek | friedrichvonhayek | hayek | lse | londonschoolofeconomics | economics | liberalism | classicalliberalism | libertarianism

License

No known copyright restrictions

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17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered.

Subjects

just society | values of liberty | equality | utilitarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | moral-political controversy | sexual morality | financing schools and elections | religious liberty | labor markets | health care | affirmative action | abortion | global justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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