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6.911 Transcribing Prosodic Structure of Spoken Utterances with ToBI (MIT) 6.911 Transcribing Prosodic Structure of Spoken Utterances with ToBI (MIT)

Description

This course presents a tutorial on the ToBI (Tones and Break Indices) system, for labelling certain aspects of prosody in Mainstream American English (MAE-ToBI). The course is appropriate for undergrad or grad students with background in linguistics (phonology or phonetics), cognitive psychology (psycholinguistics), speech acoustics or music, who wish to learn about the prosody of speech, i.e. the intonation, rhythm, grouping and prominence patterns of spoken utterances, prosodic differences that signal meaning and phonetic implementation. This course presents a tutorial on the ToBI (Tones and Break Indices) system, for labelling certain aspects of prosody in Mainstream American English (MAE-ToBI). The course is appropriate for undergrad or grad students with background in linguistics (phonology or phonetics), cognitive psychology (psycholinguistics), speech acoustics or music, who wish to learn about the prosody of speech, i.e. the intonation, rhythm, grouping and prominence patterns of spoken utterances, prosodic differences that signal meaning and phonetic implementation.

Subjects

ToBI system | ToBI system | Tones and Break Indices | Tones and Break Indices | prosodic structure | prosodic structure | spoken utterances | spoken utterances | American English | American English | ToBI tutorial | ToBI tutorial | labelling | labelling | sample utterances | sample utterances | linguistics | linguistics | phonology | phonology | phonetics | phonetics | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | speech acoustics or music | speech acoustics or music | prosody of speech | prosody of speech | intonation | intonation | rhythm | rhythm | grouping | grouping | prosodic differences | prosodic differences | phonetic implementation | phonetic implementation

License

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT) 24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t

Subjects

linguistics | linguistics | syntax | syntax | language | language | structure | structure | theory | theory | language structure | language structure | philosophy | philosophy | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | languages | languages | syntactic theory | syntactic theory | language acquisition | language acquisition | processing | processing | Principles and Parameters syntax | Principles and Parameters syntax | theoretical linguistics | theoretical linguistics

License

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24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT) 24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT)

Description

This class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Throughout the course, we will be learning (in many different ways) that human language is a surprisingly intricate -- yet law-governed and fascinating mental system. In the first 2/3 of the class, we will study some core aspects of this system in detail. In the last part of the class, we will use what we have learned to address a variety of questions, including how children acquire language, ways in which languages are affected by contact with other languages, and the representation of linguistic phenomena in the brain, among others. This class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Throughout the course, we will be learning (in many different ways) that human language is a surprisingly intricate -- yet law-governed and fascinating mental system. In the first 2/3 of the class, we will study some core aspects of this system in detail. In the last part of the class, we will use what we have learned to address a variety of questions, including how children acquire language, ways in which languages are affected by contact with other languages, and the representation of linguistic phenomena in the brain, among others.

Subjects

language | language | syntax | syntax | language acquisition | language acquisition | speech | speech | writing | writing | morphology | morphology | phonetics | phonetics | linguistics | linguistics | linguistic fieldwork | linguistic fieldwork | phonology | phonology | Animal Communication | Animal Communication | semantics | semantics | Historical linguistics | Historical linguistics

License

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24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT) 24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT)

Description

This core-curriculum linguistics class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Topics include the intricate system that governs language, how it is acquired, the similarities and differences among languages, and how spoken (and signed) language relates to written language, among others. This core-curriculum linguistics class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Topics include the intricate system that governs language, how it is acquired, the similarities and differences among languages, and how spoken (and signed) language relates to written language, among others.

Subjects

language | language | syntax | syntax | language acquisition | language acquisition | speech | speech | writing | writing | morphology | morphology | phonetics | phonetics | linguistics | linguistics | linguistic fieldwork | linguistic fieldwork | phonology | phonology | Animal Communication | Animal Communication | semantics | semantics | Historical linguistics | Historical linguistics

License

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9.00P Introduction to Psychology (MIT) 9.00P Introduction to Psychology (MIT)

Description

A first course in psychology: how we think, see, feel, learn, talk, act, grow, fear, like, love, hate, lust, and interact. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Largely experimental and social psychology, with relevant ideas from biology, philosophy, linguistics, economics, anthropology, and the arts. A first course in psychology: how we think, see, feel, learn, talk, act, grow, fear, like, love, hate, lust, and interact. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Largely experimental and social psychology, with relevant ideas from biology, philosophy, linguistics, economics, anthropology, and the arts.

Subjects

psychology | psychology | think | think | see | see | feel | feel | learn | learn | talk | talk | act | act | grow | grow | fear | fear | like | like | love | love | hate | hate | lust | lust | interact | interact | nature and nurture | nature and nurture | free will | free will | consciousness | consciousness | human differences | human differences | self | self | society | society | social psychology | social psychology | biology | biology | philosophy | philosophy | linguistics | linguistics | economics | economics | anthropology | anthropology | 9.00 | 9.00

License

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9.402 Language and Thought (MIT) 9.402 Language and Thought (MIT)

Description

Subject examines the many interrelationships between language and thought. Do people who speak different languages think differently? Does learning new languages change the way you think? Do polyglots think differently in different languages? Are some thoughts unthinkable without language? Subject examines the many interrelationships between language and thought. Do people who speak different languages think differently? Does learning new languages change the way you think? Do polyglots think differently in different languages? Are some thoughts unthinkable without language?

Subjects

language | language | thought | thought | polyglots | polyglots | cognitive | cognitive | developmental | developmental | cultural psychology | cultural psychology | linguistics | linguistics | anthropology | anthropology | ethology | ethology

License

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9.00W Introduction to Psychology (MIT) 9.00W Introduction to Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys questions about human behavior and mental life ranging from how you see to why you fall in love. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Students are exposed to the range of theoretical perspectives including biological, evolutionary, cognitive, and psychoanalytic. One of the best aspects of Psychology is that you are the subject matter. This makes it possible to do many demonstrations in lecture that allow you to experience the topic under study. Lectures work in tandem with the textbook. The course breaks into small recitations sections to allow discussion, oral presentations, and individual contact with instructors. This course surveys questions about human behavior and mental life ranging from how you see to why you fall in love. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Students are exposed to the range of theoretical perspectives including biological, evolutionary, cognitive, and psychoanalytic. One of the best aspects of Psychology is that you are the subject matter. This makes it possible to do many demonstrations in lecture that allow you to experience the topic under study. Lectures work in tandem with the textbook. The course breaks into small recitations sections to allow discussion, oral presentations, and individual contact with instructors.

Subjects

psychology | psychology | think | think | see | see | feel | feel | learn | learn | talk | talk | act | act | grow | grow | fear | fear | like | like | love | love | hate | hate | lust | lust | nature | nature | nurture | nurture | free will | free will | consciousness | consciousness | human differences | human differences | self | self | society | society | social psychology | social psychology | philosophy | philosophy | linguistics | linguistics | economics | economics | anthropology | anthropology | 9.00 | 9.00

License

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24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT) 24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT)

Description

This class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Throughout the course, we will be learning (in many different ways) that human language is a surprisingly intricate -- yet law-governed and fascinating mental system. In the first 2/3 of the class, we will study some core aspects of this system in detail. In the last part of the class, we will use what we have learned to address a variety of questions, including how children acquire language, what are the similarities and differences among languages, how spoken (and signed) language relates to written language, among others. This class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Throughout the course, we will be learning (in many different ways) that human language is a surprisingly intricate -- yet law-governed and fascinating mental system. In the first 2/3 of the class, we will study some core aspects of this system in detail. In the last part of the class, we will use what we have learned to address a variety of questions, including how children acquire language, what are the similarities and differences among languages, how spoken (and signed) language relates to written language, among others.

Subjects

linguistics | linguistics | language | language

License

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24.946 Linguistic Theory and the Japanese Language (MIT) 24.946 Linguistic Theory and the Japanese Language (MIT)

Description

We will look at some recent discoveries in Japanese language (and other relevant languages) that relate to long-standing problems in theoretical linguistics. The course is divided into three parts:A-positions and A-chains 8 weeks (approx)A'-positions and A'-chains 2 weeks (approx)Student presentations 3 weeks (approx) We will look at some recent discoveries in Japanese language (and other relevant languages) that relate to long-standing problems in theoretical linguistics. The course is divided into three parts:A-positions and A-chains 8 weeks (approx)A'-positions and A'-chains 2 weeks (approx)Student presentations 3 weeks (approx)

Subjects

Linguistic | Linguistic | Japanese | Japanese | Japanese literature | Japanese literature | theoretical linguistics | theoretical linguistics

License

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Hard words, best words words in use, writing the inventory of english

Description

English, as its vocabulary confirms, is constantly on the move - both words and meaning act as witnesses to time and change, revealing the diverse pathways of contact and conflict with other nations, as well as changes in culture and identity. Please Note: Technical difficulties interrupted the recording. We apologise for this disruption. This talk, by Lynda Mugglestone, Professor of the History of English and Fellow and Tutor in English at Pembroke College, looks at the history of the English language, examining not only the ways in which it changes (and continues to change), but also the challenges of trying to represent English in dictionaries, not least since popular notions of 'the dictionary' often tend to assume that it is a simple and non-problematic entity, neutrally telling us Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

linguistics | alumni | dictionary | language | english | linguistics | alumni | dictionary | language | english | 2012-09-15

License

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Hard words, best words words in use, writing the inventory of english

Description

English, as its vocabulary confirms, is constantly on the move - both words and meaning act as witnesses to time and change, revealing the diverse pathways of contact and conflict with other nations, as well as changes in culture and identity. Please Note: Technical difficulties interrupted the recording. We apologise for this disruption. This talk, by Lynda Mugglestone, Professor of the History of English and Fellow and Tutor in English at Pembroke College, looks at the history of the English language, examining not only the ways in which it changes (and continues to change), but also the challenges of trying to represent English in dictionaries, not least since popular notions of 'the dictionary' often tend to assume that it is a simple and non-problematic entity, neutrally telling us Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

linguistics | alumni | dictionary | language | english | linguistics | alumni | dictionary | language | english | 2012-09-15

License

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6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT) 6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject. This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.

Subjects

NLP | NLP | voice processing | voice processing | voice response | voice response | speech recognition | speech recognition | linguistics | linguistics | translation | translation | machine learning | machine learning | speech processing | speech processing | parsing | parsing | syntax | syntax | language model | language model | dialogue | dialogue | comprehension | comprehension | understanding | understanding | lexicon | lexicon | lexical | lexical | text processing | text processing | speech generation | speech generation

License

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6.863J Natural Language and the Computer Representation of Knowledge (MIT) 6.863J Natural Language and the Computer Representation of Knowledge (MIT)

Description

6.863 is a laboratory-oriented course on the theory and practice of building computer systems for human language processing, with an emphasis on the linguistic, cognitive, and engineering foundations for understanding their design. 6.863 is a laboratory-oriented course on the theory and practice of building computer systems for human language processing, with an emphasis on the linguistic, cognitive, and engineering foundations for understanding their design.

Subjects

natural language processing | natural language processing | computational methods | computational methods | computer science | computer science | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | linguistic theory | linguistic theory | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | applications | applications | thematic structure | thematic structure | lexical-conceptual structure | lexical-conceptual structure | semantic structure | semantic structure | pragmatic structure | pragmatic structure | discourse structure | discourse structure | phonology | phonology | morphology | morphology | 2-level morphology | 2-level morphology | kimmo | kimmo | hmm tagging | hmm tagging | tagging | tagging | rule-based tagging | rule-based tagging | part of speech tagging | part of speech tagging | brill tagger | brill tagger | parsing | parsing | syntax | syntax | automata | automata | word modeling | word modeling | grammars | grammars | parsing algorithms | parsing algorithms | shift-reduce parsers | shift-reduce parsers | Earley's algorithm | Earley's algorithm | chart parsing | chart parsing | context-free parsing | context-free parsing | feature-based parsing | feature-based parsing | natural language system design | natural language system design | integrated lexicon | integrated lexicon | syntactic features | syntactic features | semantic interpretation | semantic interpretation | compositionality | compositionality | quantifiers | quantifiers | lexical semantic | lexical semantic | semantics | semantics | machine translation | machine translation | language learning | language learning | computational models of language | computational models of language | origins of language | origins of language | 6.863 | 6.863 | 9.611 | 9.611

License

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9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT) 9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT)

Description

This undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to cognitive processes. The broad range of topics covers each of the areas in the field of cognition, and presents the current thinking in this discipline. As an introduction to human information processing and learning, the topics include the nature of mental representation and processing, the architecture of memory, pattern recognition, attention, imagery and mental codes, concepts and prototypes, reasoning and problem solving. This undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to cognitive processes. The broad range of topics covers each of the areas in the field of cognition, and presents the current thinking in this discipline. As an introduction to human information processing and learning, the topics include the nature of mental representation and processing, the architecture of memory, pattern recognition, attention, imagery and mental codes, concepts and prototypes, reasoning and problem solving.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | cognitive processes | cognitive processes | cognition | cognition | the mind | the mind | object recognition | object recognition | attention | attention | memory | memory | associative memory | associative memory | learning | learning | implicit memory | implicit memory | conceptual short term memory | conceptual short term memory | working memory | working memory | language | language | concepts | concepts | prototypes | prototypes | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | visual knowledge | visual knowledge | mental codes | mental codes | judgement | judgement | reasoning | reasoning | problem-solving | problem-solving | conscious thought | conscious thought | unconscious thought | unconscious thought

License

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9.56J Abnormal Language (MIT) 9.56J Abnormal Language (MIT)

Description

Introduction to the linguistic study of language pathology, concentrating on experimental approaches and theoretical explanations. Discussion of Specific Language Impairment, autism, Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, normal aging, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, hemispherectomy and aphasia. Focuses on the comparison of linguistic abilities among these syndromes, while drawing clear comparisons with first and second language acquisition. Topics include the lexicon, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Relates the lost linguistic abilities in these syndromes to properties of the brain. Introduction to the linguistic study of language pathology, concentrating on experimental approaches and theoretical explanations. Discussion of Specific Language Impairment, autism, Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, normal aging, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, hemispherectomy and aphasia. Focuses on the comparison of linguistic abilities among these syndromes, while drawing clear comparisons with first and second language acquisition. Topics include the lexicon, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Relates the lost linguistic abilities in these syndromes to properties of the brain.

Subjects

linguistics | linguistics | abnormal language | abnormal language | syntax | syntax | language acquisition | language acquisition | binding theory | binding theory | finiteness | finiteness | syntactic theory | syntactic theory | language lateralization | language lateralization | hemispherectomies | hemispherectomies | aphasia | aphasia | language loss | language loss | syntactic working memory | syntactic working memory | comprehension | comprehension | Extended Optional Infinitive Stage | Extended Optional Infinitive Stage | syntactic movement | syntactic movement | animal communication | animal communication | EOI stage | EOI stage | Williams syndrome | Williams syndrome | language processing | language processing | 9.56 | 9.56 | 24.907 | 24.907

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9.69 Foundations of Cognition (MIT) 9.69 Foundations of Cognition (MIT)

Description

Advances in cognitive science have resolved, clarified, and sometimes complicated some of the great questions of Western philosophy: what is the structure of the world and how do we come to know it; does everyone represent the world the same way; what is the best way for us to act in the world. Specific topics include color, objects, number, categories, similarity, inductive inference, space, time, causality, reasoning, decision-making, morality and consciousness. Readings and discussion include a brief philosophical history of each topic and focus on advances in cognitive and developmental psychology, computation, neuroscience, and related fields. At least one subject in cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, or artificial intelligence is required. An additional project i Advances in cognitive science have resolved, clarified, and sometimes complicated some of the great questions of Western philosophy: what is the structure of the world and how do we come to know it; does everyone represent the world the same way; what is the best way for us to act in the world. Specific topics include color, objects, number, categories, similarity, inductive inference, space, time, causality, reasoning, decision-making, morality and consciousness. Readings and discussion include a brief philosophical history of each topic and focus on advances in cognitive and developmental psychology, computation, neuroscience, and related fields. At least one subject in cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, or artificial intelligence is required. An additional project i

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | Western philosophy | Western philosophy | structure | structure | color | color | objects | objects | number | number | similarity | similarity | inductive inference | inductive inference | space | space | time | time | reasoning | reasoning | decision-making | decision-making | morality | morality | consciousness | consciousness | development | development | psychology | psychology | computation | computation | neuroscience | neuroscience | philosophy | philosophy | linguistics | linguistics | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence

License

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24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT) 24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT)

Description

This course studies what is language and what does knowledge of a language consist of. It asks how do children learn languages and is language unique to humans; why are there many languages; how do languages change; is any language or dialect superior to another; and how are speech and writing related. Context for these and similar questions is provided by basic examination of internal organization of sentences, words, and sound systems. No prior training in linguistics is assumed. This course studies what is language and what does knowledge of a language consist of. It asks how do children learn languages and is language unique to humans; why are there many languages; how do languages change; is any language or dialect superior to another; and how are speech and writing related. Context for these and similar questions is provided by basic examination of internal organization of sentences, words, and sound systems. No prior training in linguistics is assumed.

Subjects

language | language | linguistics | linguistics | syntax | syntax | phonetics | phonetics | consonants | consonants | vowels | vowels | McGurk effect | McGurk effect | phonology | phonology | phoneme | phoneme | allophone | allophone | lexicon | lexicon | affixes | affixes | topicalization | topicalization | pronunciation | pronunciation | semantics | semantics | truth conditions | truth conditions | synchronic | synchronic | diachronic | diachronic | language families | language families | Ebonics | Ebonics | dialect | dialect

License

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24.910 Topics in Linguistic Theory: Propositional Attitudes (MIT) 24.910 Topics in Linguistic Theory: Propositional Attitudes (MIT)

Description

This course explores topics related to the representation and expression of propositional attitudes (e.g. belief, knowledge, and desires) and speech acts (e.g. saying and asking) in natural language. The main focus will be on semantics of predicates such as believe, know, want, say, ask, etc. Other topics will include the syntax of main and embedded clauses and formal representation of the pragmatics of conversation. The course provides practice in written and oral communication. This course explores topics related to the representation and expression of propositional attitudes (e.g. belief, knowledge, and desires) and speech acts (e.g. saying and asking) in natural language. The main focus will be on semantics of predicates such as believe, know, want, say, ask, etc. Other topics will include the syntax of main and embedded clauses and formal representation of the pragmatics of conversation. The course provides practice in written and oral communication.

Subjects

linguistic theory | linguistic theory | linguistics | linguistics | propositional attitudes | propositional attitudes | semantics | semantics | presupposition | presupposition | sequence of tense | sequence of tense | self-locating attitudes | self-locating attitudes | logophors | logophors | CP structure | CP structure | embedded clauses | embedded clauses | control | control | raising | raising | pramatics | pramatics | evidentials | evidentials | expressive meaning | expressive meaning | conversation | conversation | common ground | common ground | assertion | assertion | embedding verbs | embedding verbs

License

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24.941J The Lexicon and Its Features (MIT) 24.941J The Lexicon and Its Features (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of the distinctive features which distinguish sound categories of languages of the world. Theories which relate these categories to their acoustic and articulatory correlates, both universally and in particular languages, are covered. Models of word recognition by listeners, features, and phonological structure are also discussed. In addition, the course offers a variety of perspectives on these issues, drawn from Electrical Engineering, Linguistics and Cognitive Science. This course provides an overview of the distinctive features which distinguish sound categories of languages of the world. Theories which relate these categories to their acoustic and articulatory correlates, both universally and in particular languages, are covered. Models of word recognition by listeners, features, and phonological structure are also discussed. In addition, the course offers a variety of perspectives on these issues, drawn from Electrical Engineering, Linguistics and Cognitive Science.

Subjects

24.941 | 24.941 | 6.543 | 6.543 | 9.587 | 9.587 | HST.727 | HST.727 | lexicon | lexicon | features | features | sound categories | sound categories | acoustic and articulatory correlates | acoustic and articulatory correlates | languages | languages | models of word recognition | models of word recognition | linguistics | linguistics | cognitive science | cognitive science

License

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24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT) 24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the philosophy of language. It examines different views on the nature of meaning, truth and reference, with special focus on the problem of understanding how linguistic communication works. This course is an introduction to the philosophy of language. It examines different views on the nature of meaning, truth and reference, with special focus on the problem of understanding how linguistic communication works.

Subjects

nature of meaning | reference | truth | and their relationships | nature of meaning | reference | truth | and their relationships | relationships between language and logic | language and knowledge | language and reality | language and acts performed through its use | relationships between language and logic | language and knowledge | language and reality | language and acts performed through its use | logic | logic | linguistics | linguistics | language | language | philosophy | philosophy

License

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24.946 Linguistic Theory and the Japanese Language (MIT) 24.946 Linguistic Theory and the Japanese Language (MIT)

Description

This course is a detailed examination of the grammar of Japanese and its structure which is significantly different from English, with special emphasis on problems of interest in the study of linguistic universals. Data from a broad group of languages is studied for comparison with Japanese. This course assumes familiarity with linguistic theory. This course is a detailed examination of the grammar of Japanese and its structure which is significantly different from English, with special emphasis on problems of interest in the study of linguistic universals. Data from a broad group of languages is studied for comparison with Japanese. This course assumes familiarity with linguistic theory.

Subjects

Linguistics | Linguistics | Linguistic Theory | Linguistic Theory | Japanese | Japanese | Language | Language | theoretical linguistics | theoretical linguistics | A-positions | A-positions | A-chains | A-chains | A'-positions | A'-positions | A'-chains | A'-chains | Double-object construction | Double-object construction | Possessor raising | Possessor raising | locational verbs | locational verbs | Binding | Binding | External argument | External argument | causative construction | causative construction | reconstruction | reconstruction | word-order permutation | word-order permutation

License

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24.964 Topics in Phonology (MIT) 24.964 Topics in Phonology (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of modeling phonology, with an empirical focus on modeling the discovery of static phonotactics, the discovery of alternations, learning in the midst of variation and exceptions, and the discovery of gradient patterns. This course is also intended to provide hands-on experience with various aspects of using and developing models, including preparing training data, running simulations, and interpreting their results. This course introduces students to the theory and practice of modeling phonology, with an empirical focus on modeling the discovery of static phonotactics, the discovery of alternations, learning in the midst of variation and exceptions, and the discovery of gradient patterns. This course is also intended to provide hands-on experience with various aspects of using and developing models, including preparing training data, running simulations, and interpreting their results.

Subjects

phonology | phonology | language | language | phonological learning | phonological learning | phonotactics | phonotactics | modeling | modeling | grammar | grammar | perl | perl | learning | learning | alternations | alternations | gradient patterns | gradient patterns | linguistics | linguistics

License

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24.951 Introduction to Syntax (MIT) 24.951 Introduction to Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned with the concepts and principles which have been of central significance in the recent development of syntactic theory, with special focus on the "Government and Binding" (GB) / "Principles and Parameters" (P&P) / "Minimalist Program" (MP) approach. It is the first of a series of two courses (24.951 is taught during the Fall and 24.952 is taught in the Spring). This course deals mostly with phrase structure, argument structure and its syntactic expression, including "A-movement". Though other issues (e.g. wh-movement, antecedent-contained deletion, extraposition) may be mentioned during the semester, the course will not systematically investigate these topics in class until 24.952. The goal of the course is to understand This course is concerned with the concepts and principles which have been of central significance in the recent development of syntactic theory, with special focus on the "Government and Binding" (GB) / "Principles and Parameters" (P&P) / "Minimalist Program" (MP) approach. It is the first of a series of two courses (24.951 is taught during the Fall and 24.952 is taught in the Spring). This course deals mostly with phrase structure, argument structure and its syntactic expression, including "A-movement". Though other issues (e.g. wh-movement, antecedent-contained deletion, extraposition) may be mentioned during the semester, the course will not systematically investigate these topics in class until 24.952. The goal of the course is to understand

Subjects

linguistics | linguistics | syntax | syntax | government | government | binding theory | binding theory | principles | principles | parameters | parameters | minimalist program | minimalist program | phrase structure | phrase structure | argument | argument | syntactic expression | syntactic expression | passives | passives | unaccusativity | unaccusativity | relational grammar | relational grammar | lexical | lexical | functional | functional | case | case | licensing | licensing | null bubjects | null bubjects | control | control | head movement | head movement | nonconfigurationality | nonconfigurationality | double objects | double objects | psych verbs | psych verbs

License

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24.953 Argument Structure and Syntax (MIT) 24.953 Argument Structure and Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course is a detailed investigation of the major issues and problems in the study of lexical argument structure and how it determines syntactic structure. Its empirical scope  is along three dimensions: typology, lexical class, and theoretical framework. The range of linguistic types include English, Japanese, Navajo, and Warlpiri. Lexical classes include those of Levin's English Verb Classes and others producing emerging work on diverse languages. The theoretical emphasis of this course is on structural relations among elements of argument structure. This course is a detailed investigation of the major issues and problems in the study of lexical argument structure and how it determines syntactic structure. Its empirical scope  is along three dimensions: typology, lexical class, and theoretical framework. The range of linguistic types include English, Japanese, Navajo, and Warlpiri. Lexical classes include those of Levin's English Verb Classes and others producing emerging work on diverse languages. The theoretical emphasis of this course is on structural relations among elements of argument structure.

Subjects

lexical argument structure | lexical argument structure | syntactic structure | syntactic structure | typology | typology | lexical class | lexical class | theoretical framework | theoretical framework | linguistics | linguistics | English | English | Japaneses | Japaneses | Navajo | Navajo | Warlpiri | Warlpiri | Levin's English Verb Classes | Levin's English Verb Classes | diverse languages | diverse languages | theoretical emphasis | theoretical emphasis | argument structure | argument structure

License

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT) STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists, This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | computers | history | history | digital | digital | scientific instrument | scientific instrument | applied science | applied science | meteorology | meteorology | nuclear physics | nuclear physics | logic | logic | mathematics | mathematics | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | biochemistry | aerospace | aerospace | medicine | medicine | supercomputing | supercomputing | distributed computing | distributed computing | linguistics | linguistics | humanities | humanities | hypertext | hypertext

License

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