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6.092 Introduction to Software Engineering in Java (MIT) 6.092 Introduction to Software Engineering in Java (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to Java™ programming and software engineering. It is designed for those who have little or no programming experience in Java and covers concepts useful to 6.005. The focus is on developing high quality, working software that solves real problems. Students will learn the fundamentals of Java, and how to use 3rd party libraries to get more done with less work. Each session includes one hour of lecture and one hour of assisted lab work. Short labs are assigned with each lecture.This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This course is an introduction to Java™ programming and software engineering. It is designed for those who have little or no programming experience in Java and covers concepts useful to 6.005. The focus is on developing high quality, working software that solves real problems. Students will learn the fundamentals of Java, and how to use 3rd party libraries to get more done with less work. Each session includes one hour of lecture and one hour of assisted lab work. Short labs are assigned with each lecture.This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

java; software engineering; programming; introductory programming; object oriented programming; software design; methods; conditionals; loops; arrays; objects; classes; inheritance; abstraction; design; exceptions; eclipse; testing; unit testing; debugging; programming style | java; software engineering; programming; introductory programming; object oriented programming; software design; methods; conditionals; loops; arrays; objects; classes; inheritance; abstraction; design; exceptions; eclipse; testing; unit testing; debugging; programming style | java | java | software engineering | software engineering | programming | programming | introductory programming | introductory programming | object oriented programming | object oriented programming | software design | software design | methods | methods | conditionals | conditionals | loops | loops | arrays | arrays | objects | objects | classes | classes | inheritance | inheritance | abstraction | abstraction | design | design | exceptions | exceptions | eclipse | eclipse | testing | testing | unit testing | unit testing | debugging | debugging | programming style | programming style

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of the following macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are public debt and international economic issues. This course also introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies. This course provides an overview of the following macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are public debt and international economic issues. This course also introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | economics | economics | output | output | employment | employment | determination | determination | unemployment | unemployment | interest rates | interest rates | Federal Reserve | Federal Reserve | inflation | inflation | monetary policy | monetary policy | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | public debt | public debt | international economics | international economics | goods market | goods market | market | market | financial markets | financial markets | open economy | open economy | exchange rate | exchange rate | labor market | labor market | phillips curve | phillips curve | growth | growth | Solow's model | Solow's model | MACROECONOMICS | MACROECONOMICS | ECONOMICS | ECONOMICS | OUTPUT | OUTPUT | Macroeconomics | Macroeconomics | EMPLOYMENT | EMPLOYMENT | DETERMINATION | DETERMINATION | UNEMPLOYMENT | UNEMPLOYMENT | INTEREST RATES | INTEREST RATES | FEDERAL RESERVE | FEDERAL RESERVE | INFLATION | INFLATION | MONETARY POLICY | MONETARY POLICY | FISCAL POLICY | FISCAL POLICY | PUBLIC DEBT | PUBLIC DEBT | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS | GOODS MARKET | GOODS MARKET | MARKET | MARKET | FINANCIAL MARKETS | FINANCIAL MARKETS | OPEN ECONOMY | OPEN ECONOMY | EXCHANGE RATE | EXCHANGE RATE | LABOR MARKET | LABOR MARKET | PHILLIPS CURVE | PHILLIPS CURVE | GROWTH | GROWTH | SOLOW'S MODEL | SOLOW'S MODEL | Economics | Economics | Output | Output | Employment | Employment | Determination | Determination | Unemployment | Unemployment | Interest Rates | Interest Rates | Inflation | Inflation | Monetary Policy | Monetary Policy | Fiscal Policy | Fiscal Policy | Public Debt | Public Debt | International Economics | International Economics | Goods Market | Goods Market | Market | Market | Financial Markets | Financial Markets | Open Economy | Open Economy | Exchange Rate | Exchange Rate | Labor Market | Labor Market | Phillips Curve | Phillips Curve | Growth | Growth | Solow's Model | Solow's Model

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Professor James Meade with Phillips Machine, 1996

Description

Professor of Commerce at LSE 1947-1957, received the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (jointly) in 1977 Extracts from ?The Phillips Machine Project? by Nicholas Bar, LSE Magazine, June 1988, No75, p.3 A.W. H. ?Bill? Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve. Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally, and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine. Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s, he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback, where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles. He reached London in 1938 via the Trans-Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war. He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp, where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners. Back in Britain he took the BSc (Econ) 1946-49, special subject sociology. He developed a great interest in economics?and like many of his generation, became very caught up with Keynesian theory. Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going. With Walter Newlyn (an undergraduate contemporary, later Professor of Economics at Leeds University) to help with the economic theory, he fell back on his engineering training. He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water, and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes. With a grant of £100 (obtained with Newlyn?s help) he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon ?living on air? as James Meade was later to put it, working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model. In the machine he constructed, the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes, with outflows representing savings, taxes and imports, and inflows representing investment, government spending and exports. The model had three tanks representing the stock of money, one for transaction balances and one for foreign-held sterling balances. The whole system determined the level of income, the rate of interest, imports, exports and the exchange to an accuracy (astonishing at the time) of +two per cent. The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy. The machine, in the jargon, was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS-LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure. It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which, with the enthusiastic support of James Meade (then Professor of Commerce at the School), Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins? seminar in November 1949. Those attending gazed in wonder at this large (7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep) ?thing? in the middle of the room. Phillips, chain smoking, paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl, in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard. Then he switched the machine on. And it worked! According to Lord Robbins? recollections, ?there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving?Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them??Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950, Lecturer 1951, Reader 1954, and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 (the year his Phillips Curve paper was published). He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and, having suffered a major stroke, retired to Auckland in 1970, where he died five years later aged 60, mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons.? IMAGELIBRARY/724 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

Subjects

lse | londonschoolofeconomics | lselibrary | awphillips | phillips | phillipsmachine | phillipshydraulicmachine | moniacmachine | jamesmeade

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Unveiling of the restored Phillips Machine, 29th June 1989

Description

Left to right: The team that restored the Phillips Machine, Colin Carter (a professional engineer), Professor James Meade, Professor Walter Newlyn (University of Leeds, LSE Alumnus), Dr Nicholas Barr, Reza Moghadam (Research Assistant, LSE Student) Extracts from ?The Phillips Machine Project? by Nicholas Bar, LSE Magazine, June 1988, No75, p.3 A.W. H. ?Bill? Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve. Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally, and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine. Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s, he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback, where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles. He reached London in 1938 via the Trans-Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war. He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp, where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners. Back in Britain he took the BSc (Econ) 1946-49, special subject sociology. He developed a great interest in economics?and like many of his generation, became very caught up with Keynesian theory. Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going. With Walter Newlyn (an undergraduate contemporary, later Professor of Economics at Leeds University) to help with the economic theory, he fell back on his engineering training. He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water, and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes. With a grant of £100 (obtained with Newlyn?s help) he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon ?living on air? as James Meade was later to put it, working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model. In the machine he constructed, the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes, with outflows representing savings, taxes and imports, and inflows representing investment, government spending and exports. The model had three tanks representing the stock of money, one for transaction balances and one for foreign-held sterling balances. The whole system determined the level of income, the rate of interest, imports, exports and the exchange to an accuracy (astonishing at the time) of +two per cent. The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy. The machine, in the jargon, was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS-LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure. It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which, with the enthusiastic support of James Meade (then Professor of Commerce at the School), Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins? seminar in November 1949. Those attending gazed in wonder at this large (7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep) ?thing? in the middle of the room. Phillips, chain smoking, paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl, in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard. Then he switched the machine on. And it worked! According to Lord Robbins? recollections, ?there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving?Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them??Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950, Lecturer 1951, Reader 1954, and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 (the year his Phillips Curve paper was published). He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and, having suffered a major stroke, retired to Auckland in 1970, where he died five years later aged 60, mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons.? IMAGELIBRARY/401 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

Subjects

lse | londonschoolofeconomics | lselibrary | aroundtheschool1980s | 1980s | awphillips | phillips | moniacmachine | phillipsmachine | phillipshydraulicmachine

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Professor James Meade, 1993

Description

With restored Phillips Machine Extracts from ?The Phillips Machine Project? by Nicholas Bar, LSE Magazine, June 1988, No75, p.3 A.W. H. ?Bill? Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve. Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally, and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine. Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s, he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback, where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles. He reached London in 1938 via the Trans-Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war. He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp, where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners. Back in Britain he took the BSc (Econ) 1946-49, special subject sociology. He developed a great interest in economics?and like many of his generation, became very caught up with Keynesian theory. Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going. With Walter Newlyn (an undergraduate contemporary, later Professor of Economics at Leeds University) to help with the economic theory, he fell back on his engineering training. He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water, and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes. With a grant of £100 (obtained with Newlyn?s help) he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon ?living on air? as James Meade was later to put it, working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model. In the machine he constructed, the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes, with outflows representing savings, taxes and imports, and inflows representing investment, government spending and exports. The model had three tanks representing the stock of money, one for transaction balances and one for foreign-held sterling balances. The whole system determined the level of income, the rate of interest, imports, exports and the exchange to an accuracy (astonishing at the time) of +two per cent. The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy. The machine, in the jargon, was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS-LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure. It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which, with the enthusiastic support of James Meade (then Professor of Commerce at the School), Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins? seminar in November 1949. Those attending gazed in wonder at this large (7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep) ?thing? in the middle of the room. Phillips, chain smoking, paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl, in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard. Then he switched the machine on. And it worked! According to Lord Robbins? recollections, ?there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving?Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them??Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950, Lecturer 1951, Reader 1954, and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 (the year his Phillips Curve paper was published). He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and, having suffered a major stroke, retired to Auckland in 1970, where he died five years later aged 60, mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons.? IMAGELIBRARY/282 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

Subjects

awphillips | phillips | phillipshydraulicmachine | phillipsmachine | moniacmachine | jamesmeade

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Professor A.W.H (Bill) Phillips with Phillips Machine c1958-67

Description

Extracts from ?The Phillips Machine Project? by Nicholas Bar, LSE Magazine, June 1988, No75, p.3 A.W. H. ?Bill? Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve. Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally, and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine. Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s, he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback, where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles. He reached London in 1938 via the Trans-Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war. He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp, where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners. Back in Britain he took the BSc (Econ) 1946-49, special subject sociology. He developed a great interest in economics?and like many of his generation, became very caught up with Keynesian theory. Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going. With Walter Newlyn (an undergraduate contemporary, later Professor of Economics at Leeds University) to help with the economic theory, he fell back on his engineering training. He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water, and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes. With a grant of £100 (obtained with Newlyn?s help) he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon ?living on air? as James Meade was later to put it, working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model. In the machine he constructed, the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes, with outflows representing savings, taxes and imports, and inflows representing investment, government spending and exports. The model had three tanks representing the stock of money, one for transaction balances and one for foreign-held sterling balances. The whole system determined the level of income, the rate of interest, imports, exports and the exchange to an accuracy (astonishing at the time) of +two per cent. The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy. The machine, in the jargon, was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS-LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure. It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which, with the enthusiastic support of James Meade (then Professor of Commerce at the School), Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins? seminar in November 1949. Those attending gazed in wonder at this large (7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep) ?thing? in the middle of the room. Phillips, chain smoking, paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl, in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard. Then he switched the machine on. And it worked! According to Lord Robbins? recollections, ?there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving?Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them??Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950, Lecturer 1951, Reader 1954, and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 (the year his Phillips Curve paper was published). He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and, having suffered a major stroke, retired to Auckland in 1970, where he died five years later aged 60, mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons.? Reference: IMAGELIBRARY/6 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

Subjects

lselibrary | lse | londonschoolofeconomics | awphillips | phillips | phillipshydraulicmachine | phillipsmachine | moniacmachine

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Illustrated page from The Queenslander, December 2, 1922 Illustrated page from The Queenslander, December 2, 1922

Description

Subjects

eclipse | eclipse | queensland | queensland | solareclipse | solareclipse | statelibraryofqueensland | statelibraryofqueensland | sydneyobservatory | sydneyobservatory | slq | slq | thequeenslander | thequeenslander | goodiwindi | goodiwindi

License

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Eclipse project QF-106 and C-141A takeoff on first tethered flight December 20, 1997 Eclipse project QF-106 and C-141A takeoff on first tethered flight December 20, 1997

Description

Subjects

armstrong | armstrong | afrc | afrc | nasaarmstrong | nasaarmstrong | aviationaerospacespaceflightnationalaeronauticsandspaceadministrationnasatowplaneeclipseprojectprojecteclipseaircraftairplaneaf612775612775lockheedlockheedc141starlifterlockheedc141lockheedstarlifterc141starlifterstarlif | aviationaerospacespaceflightnationalaeronauticsandspaceadministrationnasatowplaneeclipseprojectprojecteclipseaircraftairplaneaf612775612775lockheedlockheedc141starlifterlockheedc141lockheedstarlifterc141starlifterstarlif

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Professor A.W.H (Bill) Phillips

Description

Extracts from ?The Phillips Machine Project? by Nicholas Bar, LSE Magazine, June 1988, No75, p.3 A.W. H. ?Bill? Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve. Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally, and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine. Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s, he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback, where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles. He reached London in 1938 via the Trans-Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war. He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp, where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners. Back in Britain he took the BSc (Econ) 1946-49, special subject sociology. He developed a great interest in economics?and like many of his generation, became very caught up with Keynesian theory. Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going. With Walter Newlyn (an undergraduate contemporary, later Professor of Economics at Leeds University) to help with the economic theory, he fell back on his engineering training. He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water, and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes. With a grant of £100 (obtained with Newlyn?s help) he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon ?living on air? as James Meade was later to put it, working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model. In the machine he constructed, the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes, with outflows representing savings, taxes and imports, and inflows representing investment, government spending and exports. The model had three tanks representing the stock of money, one for transaction balances and one for foreign-held sterling balances. The whole system determined the level of income, the rate of interest, imports, exports and the exchange to an accuracy (astonishing at the time) of +two per cent. The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy. The machine, in the jargon, was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS-LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure. It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which, with the enthusiastic support of James Meade (then Professor of Commerce at the School), Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins? seminar in November 1949. Those attending gazed in wonder at this large (7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep) ?thing? in the middle of the room. Phillips, chain smoking, paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl, in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard. Then he switched the machine on. And it worked! According to Lord Robbins? recollections, ?there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving?Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them??Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950, Lecturer 1951, Reader 1954, and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 (the year his Phillips Curve paper was published). He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and, having suffered a major stroke, retired to Auckland in 1970, where he died five years later aged 60, mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons.? IMAGELIBRARY/244 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

Subjects

lse | londonschoolofeconomics | lselibrary | formallseportraits | awphillips | albanphillips | phillips

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4.125 Architecture Studio: Building in Landscapes (MIT) 4.125 Architecture Studio: Building in Landscapes (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. 4.125 is the third undergraduate design studio. This subject introduces skills needed to build within a landscape establishing continuities between the built and natural world. Students learn to build appropriately through analysis of landscape and climate for a chosen site, and to conceptualize design decisions through drawings and models. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. 4.125 is the third undergraduate design studio. This subject introduces skills needed to build within a landscape establishing continuities between the built and natural world. Students learn to build appropriately through analysis of landscape and climate for a chosen site, and to conceptualize design decisions through drawings and models.

Subjects

landscape | landscape | design | design | studio | studio | quarry | quarry | video | video | clips | clips | natural world | natural world | nature | nature

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ón en C/C++ y Aplicaciones Matemáticas (2011) ón en C/C++ y Aplicaciones Matemáticas (2011)

Description

Esta asignatura es obligatoria para el perfil "Matemáticas para la Empresa" y optativa para el itinerario "Introducción a la Investigación". El objetivo es iniciar al alumno en las técnicas básicas de programación en C y en C++ incluido el manejo de librerías de contenido matemático. La asignatura tiene un perfil eminentemente práctico, basado en la idea de que la mejor manera de aprender a programar es programando. Por ello, se impartirá en la microaula en sesiones de 2 horas. En cada sesión, se expondrán una serie de conceptos y los alumnos reailizarán prácticas de ordenador relativas a los mismos. Esta asignatura es obligatoria para el perfil "Matemáticas para la Empresa" y optativa para el itinerario "Introducción a la Investigación". El objetivo es iniciar al alumno en las técnicas básicas de programación en C y en C++ incluido el manejo de librerías de contenido matemático. La asignatura tiene un perfil eminentemente práctico, basado en la idea de que la mejor manera de aprender a programar es programando. Por ello, se impartirá en la microaula en sesiones de 2 horas. En cada sesión, se expondrán una serie de conceptos y los alumnos reailizarán prácticas de ordenador relativas a los mismos.

Subjects

C | C | eclipse | eclipse | CDT | CDT | ón | ón | áticos | áticos | ías matemáticas | ías matemáticas | GSL | GSL

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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6.251J Introduction to Mathematical Programming (MIT) 6.251J Introduction to Mathematical Programming (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to linear optimization and its extensions emphasizing the underlying mathematical structures, geometrical ideas, algorithms and solutions of practical problems. The topics covered include: formulations, the geometry of linear optimization, duality theory, the simplex method, sensitivity analysis, robust optimization, large scale optimization network flows, solving problems with an exponential number of constraints and the ellipsoid method, interior point methods, semidefinite optimization, solving real world problems problems with computer software, discrete optimization formulations and algorithms. This course is an introduction to linear optimization and its extensions emphasizing the underlying mathematical structures, geometrical ideas, algorithms and solutions of practical problems. The topics covered include: formulations, the geometry of linear optimization, duality theory, the simplex method, sensitivity analysis, robust optimization, large scale optimization network flows, solving problems with an exponential number of constraints and the ellipsoid method, interior point methods, semidefinite optimization, solving real world problems problems with computer software, discrete optimization formulations and algorithms.

Subjects

Formulations | Formulations | Simplex method | Simplex method | Duality theory | Duality theory | Sensitivity analysis | Sensitivity analysis | Robust optimization | Robust optimization | Large scale optimization | Large scale optimization | Network flows | Network flows | The Ellipsoid method | The Ellipsoid method | Interior point methods | Interior point methods | Semidefinite optimization | Semidefinite optimization | Discrete optimization | Discrete optimization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.005 Elements of Software Construction (MIT) 6.005 Elements of Software Construction (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles and techniques of software development that have greatest impact on practice. Topics include capturing the essence of a problem by recognizing and inventing suitable abstractions; key paradigms, including state machines, functional programming, and object-oriented programming; use of design patterns to bridge gap between models and code; the role of interfaces and specification in achieving modularity and decoupling; reasoning about code using invariants; testing, test-case generation and coverage; and essentials of programming with objects, functions, and abstract types. The course includes exercises in modeling, design, implementation and reasoning. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles and techniques of software development that have greatest impact on practice. Topics include capturing the essence of a problem by recognizing and inventing suitable abstractions; key paradigms, including state machines, functional programming, and object-oriented programming; use of design patterns to bridge gap between models and code; the role of interfaces and specification in achieving modularity and decoupling; reasoning about code using invariants; testing, test-case generation and coverage; and essentials of programming with objects, functions, and abstract types. The course includes exercises in modeling, design, implementation and reasoning.

Subjects

software development | software development | java programming | java programming | java | java | invariants | invariants | decoupling | decoupling | data abstraction | data abstraction | state machine | state machine | module dependency | module dependency | object model | object model | model view controller | model view controller | mvc | mvc | client server | client server | eclipse | eclipse | junit | junit | subversion | subversion | swing | swing | design | design | implement | implement | midi player | midi player | sat solver | sat solver | photo organizer | photo organizer | testing | testing | coverage | coverage | event based programming | event based programming | concurrency | concurrency

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS-102 STS-102

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Subjects

2001 | 2001 | iss | iss | missionpatch | missionpatch | march8 | march8 | march21 | march21 | johnphillips | johnphillips | yurilonchakov | yurilonchakov | sts102 | sts102 | scottparazynski | scottparazynski | chrishadfield | chrishadfield | kentrominger | kentrominger | jeffreyashby | jeffreyashby | umbertoguidone | umbertoguidone

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Triple Jupiter Eclipse Triple Jupiter Eclipse

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Subjects

2004 | 2004 | eclipse | eclipse | shadows | shadows | planet | planet | jupiter | jupiter | hubble | hubble

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F.A. Cup Trophy

Description

Photograph of Reggie Dixon in pantomime at the Empire Theatre Sunderland. He is holding a trophy. The trophy is the F.A. Cup won by Sunderland Football team. Courtesy of Sunderland Echo/All rights reserved Reference:TWCMS: K3567

Subjects

reggiedixon | empiretheatre | sunderland | facup | football | trophy | sunderlandfootballteam | pantomime | twam | tyneandwear | tyneandweararchivesandmuseums | northeast | blackandwhitephotos | oldphotographs | trophies | facuptrophy | celebrateneengland | blackwhitephotos | theatre | makeup | lipstick | glitter | shine | surreal | showbusiness | costume | socialhistory | creative | artistic | northeastofengland | unitedkingdom | blackandwhitephotograph | digitalimage | archives | documentation | woman | lips | face | facialexpression | entertainment | sport | hat | dress | ribbon | engraving | eyes | neutralbackground | glove | intricate | design | wrinkles | funny | amusing | unusual | ashbrooke | england | engaging | industry | performance | stagepresence | artform | communication | fabric | crease | grain | wig | curls | darkness | suggestive | laughter | artanddesign | abstract | man | portrait | selfexpression

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Teesmouth 1970

Description

The foreground of this image shows the Philips Imperial Petroleum Refinery with the ICI North Tees Works behind. To the left are the Monsanto Works and Seal Sands. The North Gare Sands can be seen, upper right, and Hartlepool in the distance, upper left. Reference: TWAS: DT.TUR.7.16 (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk. To purchase a hi-res copy please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk quoting the title and reference number

Subjects

aerialviews | aerialphotographs | tyneandwear | teesmouthseal | sandsicinorth | tees | worksphilips | imperial | petroleum | refinerymonsanto | worksnorth | gare | sandshartlepoolmuseumtwamtyne | wear | archives | museums | city | view | river | turner | blackwhitephotos | aerialphotograph | digitalimage | documentation | blackandwhitephotograph | land | chimney | teesmouth | 1970 | shelloil | philipsimperialpetroleumrefinery | icinorthteesworks | monsantoworks | sealsands | northgaresands | hartlepool | grain | blur | landscape | industrialheritage | industry | cowpenbewley | northeastofengland | unitedkingdom | aerialview | glimpse | interesting | unusual | compelling | water | sand | passage | buildings | cylinder | roof | wall | landmark | road | vessel | maritimeheritage | daylight | bank | line | block | ground | smoke | sky | shadow

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No known copyright restrictions

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Setting up a telescope in preparation for an eclipse, Stanthorpe, 1922

Description

Subjects

eclipse | september | trenchcoat | telescope | queensland | astronomy | 1922 | solareclipse | statelibraryofqueensland | stanthorpe | slq

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Solar eclipse taken from Sandgate, Brisbane

Description

Subjects

eclipse | brisbane | queensland | 1922 | sandgate | solareclipse | statelibraryofqueensland | slq | jlunn

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Observatory erected at Goondiwindi to view the eclipse in September 1922

Description

Subjects

eclipse | observatory | queensland | 1922 | solareclipse | statelibraryofqueensland | astrograph | slq | goodiwindi

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Geological Structures

Description

www.hostwebsite.com/rockdef/

Subjects

ellipsoid | ellipse | geology | rock deformation | geological structure | earth science | ukescc | ukoer | geesoer | stress | strain | vectors | body forces | surface forces | fold | folding | fault | faulting | shear | shearing | shear zone | crenulation | conjugate faults | mohr circle | flinn diagram | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Ellen Leavy alias Burns, arrested for stealing clothes Ellen Leavy alias Burns, arrested for stealing clothes

Description

Subjects

woman | woman | blur | blur | eye | eye | face | face | hat | hat | drunk | drunk | mouth | mouth | hair | hair | nose | nose | interesting | interesting | sad | sad | arm | arm | skin | skin | head | head | daughter | daughter | grain | grain | lips | lips | blouse | blouse | criminal | criminal | crime | crime | blanket | blanket | ear | ear | mysterious | mysterious | mugshot | mugshot | lonely | lonely | unusual | unusual | shoulders | shoulders | robbery | robbery | theft | theft | policestation | policestation | crease | crease | wrinkle | wrinkle | arrested | arrested | stealing | stealing | prisoner | prisoner | fascinating | fascinating | digitalimage | digitalimage | backlane | backlane | withdrawn | withdrawn | charged | charged | prosecutor | prosecutor | draper | draper | northshields | northshields | imprisoned | imprisoned | prisontime | prisontime | remand | remand | northtyneside | northtyneside | socialhistory | socialhistory | shopdoor | shopdoor | accomplice | accomplice | courtcase | courtcase | blackandwhitephotograph | blackandwhitephotograph | policereport | policereport | noresponse | noresponse | savillestreet | savillestreet | neutralbackground | neutralbackground | childsdress | childsdress | newspaperreport | newspaperreport | northshieldspolicecourt | northshieldspolicecourt | criminalfacesofnorthshieldsthewomen | criminalfacesofnorthshieldsthewomen | northshieldspolicestation | northshieldspolicestation | 5march1906 | 5march1906 | inspectorthornton | inspectorthornton | pcgraham | pcgraham | rosesparrow | rosesparrow | 6s11d | 6s11d | 8barringtonlane | 8barringtonlane | missmahogg | missmahogg | ellenleavyaliasburns | ellenleavyaliasburns | sibthorpestreet | sibthorpestreet | mrthosheslop | mrthosheslop | no96bedfordstreet | no96bedfordstreet | parkstreetsouthshields | parkstreetsouthshields | 13s8d | 13s8d | sevenblouses | sevenblouses

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Art in Renaissance Venice Art in Renaissance Venice

Description

This free course, Art in Renaissance Venice, considers the art of Renaissance Venice and how such art was determined in many ways by the city's geographical location and ethnically diverse population. Studying Venice and its art offers a challenge to the conventional notion of Renaissance art as an entirely Italian phenomenon. First published on Fri, 15 Jan 2016 as Art in Renaissance Venice. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Art in Renaissance Venice, considers the art of Renaissance Venice and how such art was determined in many ways by the city's geographical location and ethnically diverse population. Studying Venice and its art offers a challenge to the conventional notion of Renaissance art as an entirely Italian phenomenon. First published on Fri, 15 Jan 2016 as Art in Renaissance Venice. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Visual Art | Visual Art | Venice | Venice | renaissance | renaissance | Gothic | Gothic | habits | habits | Norbert Elias | Norbert Elias | free trade | free trade | Bob Phillips | Bob Phillips | AA315_1 | AA315_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Waiting for the Solar Eclipse Waiting for the Solar Eclipse

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Subjects

dog | dog | galway | galway | cogalway | cogalway | h | h | bobs | bobs | solareclipse | solareclipse | connaught | connaught | crofton | crofton | nationallibraryofireland | nationallibraryofireland | dillonfamily | dillonfamily | katiedillon | katiedillon | lukegeralddillon | lukegeralddillon | peopleidentified | peopleidentified | robertedwarddillon | robertedwarddillon | augustacarolinedillon | augustacarolinedillon | baronessclonbrock | baronessclonbrock | bobsthedog | bobsthedog | dateestablished | dateestablished | edithaugustadillon | edithaugustadillon | theclonbrockphotographiccollection | theclonbrockphotographiccollection | baronclonbrock | baronclonbrock | 28thmay1900 | 28thmay1900 | 4thlordclonbrock | 4thlordclonbrock | dogsnamediscovered | dogsnamediscovered | ethellouisadillon | ethellouisadillon | 5thbaronclonbrock | 5thbaronclonbrock | edwardhenrychurchillcrofton | edwardhenrychurchillcrofton | 3rdbaroncroftonofmote | 3rdbaroncroftonofmote | 4thbaronclonbrock | 4thbaronclonbrock | maycrofton | maycrofton

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Sousa (LOC) Sousa (LOC)

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Subjects

libraryofcongress | libraryofcongress | johnphilipsousa | johnphilipsousa

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