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CMS.998 New Media Literacies (MIT) CMS.998 New Media Literacies (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an in-depth look at literacy theory in media contexts, from its origins in ancient Greece to its functions and changes in the current age of digital media, participatory cultures, and technologized learning environments. Students will move quickly through traditional historical accounts of print literacies; the majority of the semester will focus on treating literacy as more than a functional skill (i.e., one's ability to read and write) and instead as a sophisticated set of meaning-making activities situated in specific social spaces. These new media literacies include the practices and concepts of: fan fiction writing, online social networking, videogaming, appropriation and remixing, transmedia navigation, multitasking, performance, distributed cognition, and coll This course serves as an in-depth look at literacy theory in media contexts, from its origins in ancient Greece to its functions and changes in the current age of digital media, participatory cultures, and technologized learning environments. Students will move quickly through traditional historical accounts of print literacies; the majority of the semester will focus on treating literacy as more than a functional skill (i.e., one's ability to read and write) and instead as a sophisticated set of meaning-making activities situated in specific social spaces. These new media literacies include the practices and concepts of: fan fiction writing, online social networking, videogaming, appropriation and remixing, transmedia navigation, multitasking, performance, distributed cognition, and coll

Subjects

new media | new media | literacy | literacy | web 2.0 | web 2.0 | comparative media | comparative media | western literacy | western literacy | social turn | social turn | media production | media production | media use | media use | media interpretation | media interpretation | literacy production | literacy production

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT) 21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert. This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | writing | science | science | technology | technology | communications | communications | medicine | medicine | public | public | public interest | public interest | science in the public interest | science in the public interest | education | education | literacy | literacy | science literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature | nature writing | nature writing | craft | craft | process | process | scientists | scientists | news | news | article | article | essay | essay | write | write | read | read | composition | composition | revise | revise | revision | revision | rewrite | rewrite | archive | archive | archival | archival | history | history | history of science | history of science | history of technology | history of technology | history of medicine | history of medicine | history of nature | history of nature | nature of history | nature of history | nature of technology | nature of technology | technological history | technological history | medical history | medical history | science of history | science of history | writing history | writing history | history of writing | history of writing | writing history of history of science | writing history of history of science | interview | interview | interviewing | interviewing | publish | publish | publishing | publishing | teaching writing | teaching writing | writing teaching | writing teaching | book | book | book review | book review | writing book review | writing book review | discussion | discussion | draft | draft | drafting | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Assignment Survival Kit (ASK)

Description

Assignment Survival Kit is a web-based tool aimed at providing round the clock support for students tackling their first assignment (an essay, a report, a poster or a portfolio). The student enters a start and finishing date and a stepped schedule, mapping out key stages in the completion of the work, is then created. The schedule gives a suggested timescale for activities undertaken in producing an assignment including planning, finding and evaluating materials, citing references and presentation. The software aims to help students adapt to study at tertiary level, encouraging them to take a different approach to their work and providing a single link to the wide range of study support resources available.

Subjects

information literacy | time management | academic skills | essay writing | ukoer | academic literacy | evaluate information | use information | digital literacy | find information | media literacy | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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CMS.998 New Media Literacies (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an in-depth look at literacy theory in media contexts, from its origins in ancient Greece to its functions and changes in the current age of digital media, participatory cultures, and technologized learning environments. Students will move quickly through traditional historical accounts of print literacies; the majority of the semester will focus on treating literacy as more than a functional skill (i.e., one's ability to read and write) and instead as a sophisticated set of meaning-making activities situated in specific social spaces. These new media literacies include the practices and concepts of: fan fiction writing, online social networking, videogaming, appropriation and remixing, transmedia navigation, multitasking, performance, distributed cognition, and coll

Subjects

new media | literacy | web 2.0 | comparative media | western literacy | social turn | media production | media use | media interpretation | literacy production

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | science | technology | communications | medicine | public | public interest | science in the public interest | education | literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature writing | craft | process | scientists | news | article | essay | write | read | composition | revise | revision | rewrite | archive | archival | history | history of science | history of technology | history of medicine | history of nature | nature of history | nature of technology | technological history | medical history | science of history | writing history | history of writing | writing history of history of science | interview | interviewing | publish | publishing | teaching writing | writing teaching | book | book review | writing book review | discussion | draft | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Media and National Development Policy (2)

Description

Authors:  Ibrahim Saleh This lecture material demonstrates the responsible use, ethics and safety issues in using electronic media. Clicked 6 times. Last clicked 06/05/2014 - 10:27. Teaching & Learning Context:  Part 2 of a series on the role of the media in national development. Click <a href="https://vula.uct.ac.za/access/content/group/37a3ac34-d159-4bcb-b555-9b6a2f851a1f/OER%20Content/Media%20and%20National%20Development%20Policy/Media%20and%20National%20Development%20Policy%20in%20SA%20-%203.pptx">here</a> for Part 3.

Subjects

Film and Media Studies | Humanities | Downloadable Documents | Lecture Notes | English | Post-secondary | congruence model | critical literacy | cultural literacy | electronic media | ethics | expectancy-valence model | ICTs | information literacy | Media Literacy

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/za/

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CMS.998 New Media Literacies (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an in-depth look at literacy theory in media contexts, from its origins in ancient Greece to its functions and changes in the current age of digital media, participatory cultures, and technologized learning environments. Students will move quickly through traditional historical accounts of print literacies; the majority of the semester will focus on treating literacy as more than a functional skill (i.e., one's ability to read and write) and instead as a sophisticated set of meaning-making activities situated in specific social spaces. These new media literacies include the practices and concepts of: fan fiction writing, online social networking, videogaming, appropriation and remixing, transmedia navigation, multitasking, performance, distributed cognition, and coll

Subjects

new media | literacy | web 2.0 | comparative media | western literacy | social turn | media production | media use | media interpretation | literacy production

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Communicating Science to the Public (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to writing about science (including medicine, technology, and engineering) for general readers. With a strong emphasis in background research, this course will help students build a foundation for strong science writing. Students will read works by accomplished science writers. Each assignment will focus on a different popular form, such as news articles, interviews, essays, and short features. 

Subjects

science writing | writing | science | technology | communications | medicine | public | public interest | education | literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | research

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | science | technology | communications | medicine | public | public interest | science in the public interest | education | literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature writing | craft | process | scientists | news | article | essay | write | read | composition | revise | revision | rewrite | archive | archival | history | history of science | history of technology | history of medicine | history of nature | nature of history | nature of technology | technological history | medical history | science of history | writing history | history of writing | writing history of history of science | interview | interviewing | publish | publishing | teaching writing | writing teaching | book | book review | writing book review | discussion | draft | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT) SP.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT)

Description

This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few. This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few.

Subjects

passing | passing | race | race | gender | gender | class | class | literacy | literacy | American literature | American literature | queer | queer | genderqueer | genderqueer | transgender | transgender | Nella Larsen | Nella Larsen | Michel Foucault | Michel Foucault | sexuality | sexuality | Judith Butler | Judith Butler | transsexual | transsexual | William Craft | William Craft | Ellen Craft | Ellen Craft | modernism | modernism | post-modernism | post-modernism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.418 From Print to Digital: Technologies of the Word, 1450-Present (MIT) 21H.418 From Print to Digital: Technologies of the Word, 1450-Present (MIT)

Description

There has been much discussion in recent years, on this campus and elsewhere, about the death of the book. Digitization and various forms of electronic media, some critics say, are rendering the printed text as obsolete as the writing quill. In this subject, we will examine the claims for and against the demise of the book, but we will also supplement these arguments with an historical perspective they lack: we will examine texts, printing technologies, and reading communities from roughly 1450 to the present. We will begin with the theoretical and historical overviews of Walter Ong and Elizabeth Eisenstein, after which we will study specific cases such as English chapbooks, Inkan knotted and dyed strings, late nineteenth-century recording devices, and newspapers online today. We will also There has been much discussion in recent years, on this campus and elsewhere, about the death of the book. Digitization and various forms of electronic media, some critics say, are rendering the printed text as obsolete as the writing quill. In this subject, we will examine the claims for and against the demise of the book, but we will also supplement these arguments with an historical perspective they lack: we will examine texts, printing technologies, and reading communities from roughly 1450 to the present. We will begin with the theoretical and historical overviews of Walter Ong and Elizabeth Eisenstein, after which we will study specific cases such as English chapbooks, Inkan knotted and dyed strings, late nineteenth-century recording devices, and newspapers online today. We will also

Subjects

digitization | digitization | digital | digital | printing | printing | text | text | reading community | reading community | newspaper | newspaper | online | online | library | library | Ong | Ong | Eisenstein | Eisenstein | orality | orality | literacy | literacy | chapbooks | chapbooks | typesetting | typesetting | technology | technology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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How to Write a Literature Review

Description

This interactive tutorial is aimed at those students involved in critical research and outlines the purpose of a literature review. At the end of the tutorial, students will demonstrate an understanding of how to write a literature review and engage in critical analysis. The tutorial contains quizzes and interactions and the user is given the opportunity to work through the content in a self paced manner.

Subjects

literature review | critical review | critcical analysis | analytical research | information literacy | critical review | critical analysis | analytical research | information literacy

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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Teaching students the writing process

Description

A poster and training handout resource for teachers. Presents the steps used in the English skill of writing and then describes how these are linked to Information literacy. Describes the the information literacy search cycle. Includes teaching activities that can be used to embed information literacy and English skills into vocational teaching at all levels

Subjects

Writing | Plagiarism | Information literacy | Library skills | Digital literacy | Reading | Referencing | Research | English | Planning | Teacher training | teaching | Further Education | Vocational education | Poster | training | Education

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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Rich and Poor in Britain in the Age of Dickens and Today

Description

A lecture exploring the differences and similarities between the rich and poor of Dickens' era and that of today. Alison Jackson, Jane Humphries, Helen Small and Paul Donovan bring forward their views in a panel discussion. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poor | charles dickens | economics | poverty | dickens | social | working class | literacy | poor | charles dickens | economics | poverty | dickens | social | working class | literacy | 2012-09-16

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Video demonstration of Word styles and tutorial sheet

Description

2.5 minute video demonstration showing why using styles (H1, H2 etc) increases efficiency and how to apply them to a document and how to modify the pre-set styles. Accompanied by text (html) Word 2003.

Subjects

bioscience it skills | word processing | microsoft word | styles | headings | h1 | h2 it skills | information literacy | jorumcomp10 | digital literacy | office efficiency | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Media and National Development Policy (4)

Description

Authors:  Ibrahim Saleh This lecture focuses on ethics and responsibility in media, with a focus on information literacy development and legacy in post-apartheid South Africa. Clicked 10 times. Last clicked 07/25/2014 - 16:09. Teaching & Learning Context:  Part 4 of the lecture series on the role of the media in national development policy. Click <a href="https://vula.uct.ac.za/access/content/group/37a3ac34-d159-4bcb-b555-9b6a2f851a1f/OER%20Content/Media%20and%20National%20Development%20Policy/Media%20and%20National%20Development%20Policy%20in%20SA%20-%205.pptx">here</a> for Part

Subjects

Film and Media Studies | Humanities | Downloadable Documents | Lecture Notes | English | Post-secondary | cultural literacy | ethics in media | information literacy | media responsibility

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/za/

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT)

Description

Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w

Subjects

drama | drama | forbidden plays | forbidden plays | Modern America | Modern America | decision alley | decision alley | drama strategies | drama strategies | drama skills | drama skills | purchasing institution | purchasing institution | drama activity | drama activity | drama activities | drama activities | writing opportunity | writing opportunity | last wolf | last wolf | learning medium | learning medium | literacy activities | literacy activities | writing opportunities | writing opportunities | foundation stage | foundation stage | assessment focus | assessment focus | two long lines | two long lines | dramatic activity | dramatic activity | action conventions | action conventions | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre | theatre | censorship | censorship | blacklist | blacklist | banned | banned | obscenity | obscenity | architecture | architecture | selective realism | selective realism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Using web 2.0 technologies to develop literacy, communication and research skills at Cardonald College

Description

An important element of the course is a series of workshops and activity days. On Friday all students can choose from a variety of optional subjects. These activities/subjects include photography, music and newsletter group amongst others.

Subjects

2010 | Cardonald College | case studies | information literacy skills | literacy skills | research skills | web2.0 | None

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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Lecture 21: Games as Teaching Tools Lecture 21: Games as Teaching Tools

Description

Description: A panel of game developers from the Education Arcade and Learning Games Network talk about their research, effectively connecting learning and games, engaging a target audience, defining and evaluating success, and common design pitfalls. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Konstantin Mitgutsch, Dan Roy, Scot OsterweilKeywords: education, target audience, accessibility, literacy, user feedback, evaluation, playtesting, prototyping, usability, math, science, language, puzzles, teaching, pedagogy, learningTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: A panel of game developers from the Education Arcade and Learning Games Network talk about their research, effectively connecting learning and games, engaging a target audience, defining and evaluating success, and common design pitfalls. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Konstantin Mitgutsch, Dan Roy, Scot OsterweilKeywords: education, target audience, accessibility, literacy, user feedback, evaluation, playtesting, prototyping, usability, math, science, language, puzzles, teaching, pedagogy, learningTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

education | education | target audience | target audience | accessibility | accessibility | literacy | literacy | user feedback | user feedback | evaluation | evaluation | playtesting | playtesting | prototyping | prototyping | usability | usability | math | math | science | science | language | language | puzzles | puzzles | teaching | teaching | pedagogy | pedagogy | learning | learning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.SP.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT) ES.SP.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT)

Description

This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few. This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few.

Subjects

passing | passing | race | race | gender | gender | class | class | literacy | literacy | American literature | American literature | queer | queer | genderqueer | genderqueer | transgender | transgender | Nella Larsen | Nella Larsen | Michel Foucault | Michel Foucault | sexuality | sexuality | Judith Butler | Judith Butler | transsexual | transsexual | William Craft | William Craft | Ellen Craft | Ellen Craft | modernism | modernism | post-modernism | post-modernism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.405 Media and Methods: Seeing and Expression (MIT) CMS.405 Media and Methods: Seeing and Expression (MIT)

Description

In this course students create digital visual images and analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives with an emphasis on art and design, examining visual experience in broad terms, and from the perspectives of both creators and viewers. The course addresses key topics such as: image making as a cognitive and perceptual practice, the production of visual significance and meaning, and the role of technology in creating and understanding digitally produced images. Students will be given design problems growing out of their reading and present solutions using technologies such as the Adobe Creative Suite and/or similar applications. In this course students create digital visual images and analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives with an emphasis on art and design, examining visual experience in broad terms, and from the perspectives of both creators and viewers. The course addresses key topics such as: image making as a cognitive and perceptual practice, the production of visual significance and meaning, and the role of technology in creating and understanding digitally produced images. Students will be given design problems growing out of their reading and present solutions using technologies such as the Adobe Creative Suite and/or similar applications.

Subjects

media | media | design | design | visual design | visual design | visual literacy | visual literacy | comics | comics | semiotics | semiotics | sequential art | sequential art | signs | signs | shapes | shapes | patterns | patterns | augury | augury | cognition | cognition | creativity | creativity | psychology | psychology | image | image | imago | imago | mimesis | mimesis | representation | representation | icon | icon | iconology | iconology | iconoclasm | iconoclasm | iconogasm | iconogasm | gestalt | gestalt | ideology | ideology | text | text | shahrazad | shahrazad | myth | myth | mythos | mythos | mythology | mythology | typography | typography | type | type | information design | information design | color | color | space | space | visual culture | visual culture | digital media | digital media

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.100 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT) CMS.100 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

This course offers an overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic impact of mediated communication on modern culture. Combines critical discussions with experiments working with different media. Media covered include radio, television, film, the printed word, and digital technologies. Topics include the nature and function of media, core media institutions, and media in transition. This course offers an overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic impact of mediated communication on modern culture. Combines critical discussions with experiments working with different media. Media covered include radio, television, film, the printed word, and digital technologies. Topics include the nature and function of media, core media institutions, and media in transition.

Subjects

mass communication | mass communication | mass film | mass film | television | television | video games | video games | recorded music | recorded music | digital media | digital media | multimedia | multimedia | media literacy | media literacy | social media | social media | media convergence | media convergence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT) CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT)

Description

Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp

Subjects

hacking | hacking | trolling | trolling | hacker | hacker | troll | troll | mass-murder | mass-murder | bully | bully | deviance | deviance | deviant | deviant | new media | new media | old media | old media | middle-aged media | middle-aged media | media | media | technology | technology | behavior | behavior | otaku | otaku | artifact | artifact | politics | politics | society | society | outsiders | outsiders | marihuana | marihuana | control | control | moral | moral | panic | panic | writing | writing | print | print | plato | plato | phaedrus | phaedrus | jowett | jowett | conciousness | conciousness | orality | orality | literacy | literacy | anxieties | anxieties | anxiety | anxiety | modernity | modernity | penny | penny | dreadful | dreadful | juvenile | juvenile | crime | crime | delinquency | delinquency | delinquent | delinquent | children | children | television | television | chip | chip | regulation | regulation | seduction | seduction | innocence | innocence | innocent | innocent | movies | movies | film | film | Marx | Marx | Engles | Engles | Jenkins | Jenkins | ruling | ruling | lass | lass | gender | gender | youth | youth | sex | sex | violence | violence | digital | digital | threat | threat | treat | treat | affect | affect | virus | virus | body | body | stupid | stupid | facebook | facebook | bookface | bookface | google | google | internet | internet | book | book | identity | identity | deception | deception | virtual | virtual | community | community | flesh | flesh | reddit | reddit | vigilante | vigilante | weirdness | weirdness | crackdown | crackdown | Sterling | Sterling | Doctorow | Doctorow | pornography | pornography | predator | predator | porn | porn | terror | terror | terrorism | terrorism | grief | grief | resistance | resistance | drama | drama | teen | teen | gossip | gossip | network | network | public | public | private | private | video | video | game | game | videogame | videogame | columbine | columbine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SMILE York St John

Description

Your online presence (digital footprint)

Subjects

information literacy | digital literacy | undergraduate | academic skills | academic | online | SMILE | blended learning | self study | study methods | HE

License

Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

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Info skills

Description

Info skills is an online resource which guides undergraduates through researching their first assignment, with emphasis on identifying, finding and evaluating, and referening information, through a variety of media.

Subjects

information literacy | online information literacy | info skills | information skills | finding information | evaluating information | referencing information | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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