Array ( [:term] => literature [:results] => 692 [:ip] => 54.166.130.22 [:time] => 1493284727 ) Search results

Searching for literature : 692 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Description

The presentations focus on the importance of disappearance as much as appearance, presence as well as absence, and growth in the guise of degeneration, arguing from difference perspectives for the importance of malaise or corrosion as a subject of study. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Tonga | Decay | enchantment | american literature | riots | attrition | second language loss | Irish literature | Tonga | Decay | enchantment | american literature | riots | attrition | second language loss | Irish literature

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129171/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

s Chivalric Romance as a Source of Italian Epic Theory

Description

Professor Daniel Javitch (Emeritus Prof. Comparative Literature, New York University) gives a talk for the Keble College ASC Creativity lecture series on 28th May 2013. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | Ariosto | keble college | romance | Italian literature | chivarly | italian | literature | Ariosto | keble college | romance | Italian literature | chivarly | italian

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129166/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21G.022J International Women's Voices (MIT) 21G.022J International Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom

Subjects

21G.022 | 21G.022 | WGS.141 | WGS.141 | Women | Women | International | International | Global | Global | Contemporary literature | Contemporary literature | Writers | Writers | Asia | Asia | Africa | Africa | Middle east | Middle east | Latin america | Latin america | North america | North america | Non-western | Non-western | Gender roles | Gender roles | Culture | Culture | Heritage | Heritage | Female | Female | History | History | Colonialism | Colonialism | Religion | Religion | Nationalism | Nationalism | Socialization | Socialization | Language | Language | Patriarchal | Patriarchal | Sex | Sex | Marriage | Marriage | Politics | Politics | Love | Love | Work | Work | Identity | Identity | Fiction | Fiction | literature | literature | SP.461J | SP.461J | WMN.461J | WMN.461J | SP.461 | SP.461 | WMN.461 | WMN.461

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Description

The presentations focus on the importance of disappearance as much as appearance, presence as well as absence, and growth in the guise of degeneration, arguing from difference perspectives for the importance of malaise or corrosion as a subject of study. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Tonga | Decay | enchantment | american literature | riots | attrition | second language loss | Irish literature | Tonga | Decay | enchantment | american literature | riots | attrition | second language loss | Irish literature

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129171/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.001X Foundations of World Culture I: World Civilizations and Texts (MIT) 21L.001X Foundations of World Culture I: World Civilizations and Texts (MIT)

Description

This course aims to introduce students to the rich diversity of human culture from antiquity to the early 17th century. In this course, we will explore human culture in its myriad expressions, focusing on the study of literary, religious and philosophical texts as ways of narrating, symbolizing, and commenting on all aspects of human social and material life. We will work comparatively, reading texts from various cultures: Mesopotamian, Greek, Judeo-Christian, Chinese, Indian, and Muslim. Throughout the semester, we will be asking questions like: How have different cultures imagined themselves? What are the rules that they draw up for human behavior? How do they represent the role of the individual in society? How do they imagine 'universal' concepts like love, family, duty? How have the This course aims to introduce students to the rich diversity of human culture from antiquity to the early 17th century. In this course, we will explore human culture in its myriad expressions, focusing on the study of literary, religious and philosophical texts as ways of narrating, symbolizing, and commenting on all aspects of human social and material life. We will work comparatively, reading texts from various cultures: Mesopotamian, Greek, Judeo-Christian, Chinese, Indian, and Muslim. Throughout the semester, we will be asking questions like: How have different cultures imagined themselves? What are the rules that they draw up for human behavior? How do they represent the role of the individual in society? How do they imagine 'universal' concepts like love, family, duty? How have the

Subjects

philosophy | philosophy | religion | religion | human society | human society | international classical literature | international classical literature | great books | great books | classics | classics | world literature | world literature

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.705 Major Authors: Rewriting Genesis: "Paradise Lost" and Twentieth-Century Fantasy (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: Rewriting Genesis: "Paradise Lost" and Twentieth-Century Fantasy (MIT)

Description

What does the Genesis story of creation and temptation tell us about gender, about heterosexuality, and about the origins of evil? What is the nature of God, and how can we account for that nature in a cosmos where evil exists? When is rebellion justified, and when is authority legitimate? These are some of the key questions that engaged the poet John Milton, and that continue to engage readers of his work. What does the Genesis story of creation and temptation tell us about gender, about heterosexuality, and about the origins of evil? What is the nature of God, and how can we account for that nature in a cosmos where evil exists? When is rebellion justified, and when is authority legitimate? These are some of the key questions that engaged the poet John Milton, and that continue to engage readers of his work.

Subjects

Genesis | Genesis | Paradise Lost | Paradise Lost | Renaissance literature | Renaissance literature | medieval literature | medieval literature | poetry | poetry | epic poetry | epic poetry | religious poetry | religious poetry | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary analysis | literary analysis | Philip Pullman | Philip Pullman | The Golden Compass | The Golden Compass | His Dark Materials | His Dark Materials | William Blake | William Blake | Biblical analysis | Biblical analysis | Bible | Bible | seminar course | seminar course | discussion | discussion | Twentieth-Centry Fantasy | Twentieth-Centry Fantasy | Rewriting Genesis | Rewriting Genesis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

News from nowhere, or, An epoch of rest : being some chapters from a utopian romance News from nowhere, or, An epoch of rest : being some chapters from a utopian romance

Description

ebook version of News from nowhere, or, An epoch of rest : being some chapters from a utopian romance ebook version of News from nowhere, or, An epoch of rest : being some chapters from a utopian romance

Subjects

kind | kind | Fiction -- Great Britain -- 19th century | Fiction -- Great Britain -- 19th century | Fantasy literature -- Great Britain -- 19th century | Fantasy literature -- Great Britain -- 19th century | Utopian literature -- Great Britain -- 19th century | Utopian literature -- Great Britain -- 19th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://www.ota.ox.ac.uk/catalogue/epubfeed.rss

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT) 11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT)

Description

This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as

Subjects

understandings of the city | understandings of the city | social science literature and the field of urban design | social science literature and the field of urban design | literature on the history and theory of the city | literature on the history and theory of the city | larger territorial settings | larger territorial settings | nature | character | and functioning of cities | nature | character | and functioning of cities | lives of inhabitants | lives of inhabitants | theory and practice of design visions for the city | theory and practice of design visions for the city | utopian | utopian | utopian and realized form | utopian and realized form | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | future prospects of cities | future prospects of cities | territory | territory | cities | cities | context | context | local | local | national | national | global | global | urban settings | urban settings | city design | city design | social justice | social justice | politics of change | politics of change | urban design | urban design | history | history | theory | theory | territorial settings | territorial settings | urbanites | urbanites | city dwellers | city dwellers | inhabitants | inhabitants | nestedness | nestedness | regional | regional | imperial | imperial | politics | politics | sociology | sociology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.705 Major Authors: John Milton (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: John Milton (MIT)

Description

In 1667, John Milton published what he intended both as the crowning achievement of a poetic career and a justification of God's ways to man: an epic poem which retold and reimagined the Biblical story of creation, temptation, and original sin. Even in a hostile political climate, Paradise Lost was almost immediately recognized as a classic, and one fate of a classic is to be rewritten, both by admirers and by antagonists. In this seminar, we will read Paradise Lost alongside works of 20th century fantasy and science fiction which rethink both Milton's text and its source. Students should come to the seminar having read Paradise Lost straight through at least once; this can be accomplished by taking the IAP subject, Reading Paradise Lost (21L.995), or independently. Twentieth century au In 1667, John Milton published what he intended both as the crowning achievement of a poetic career and a justification of God's ways to man: an epic poem which retold and reimagined the Biblical story of creation, temptation, and original sin. Even in a hostile political climate, Paradise Lost was almost immediately recognized as a classic, and one fate of a classic is to be rewritten, both by admirers and by antagonists. In this seminar, we will read Paradise Lost alongside works of 20th century fantasy and science fiction which rethink both Milton's text and its source. Students should come to the seminar having read Paradise Lost straight through at least once; this can be accomplished by taking the IAP subject, Reading Paradise Lost (21L.995), or independently. Twentieth century au

Subjects

John Milton | John Milton | Paradise Lost | Paradise Lost | Renaissance literature | Renaissance literature | medieval literature | medieval literature | poetry | poetry | epic poetry | epic poetry | religious poetry | religious poetry | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary analysis | literary analysis | Philip Pullman | Philip Pullman | The Golden Compass | The Golden Compass | His Dark Materials | His Dark Materials | William Blake | William Blake | Biblical analysis | Biblical analysis | Bible | Bible | Genesis | Genesis | seminar course | seminar course | discussion | discussion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature appreciation | literature analysis | literature analysis | political theory | political theory | oratory | oratory | autobiography | autobiography | poetry | poetry | science fiction | science fiction | war | war | Renaissance | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Cort?s | Sahag?n | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Voltaire | Blake | Blake | Williams | Williams | Civil War | Civil War | abolition | abolition | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Lincoln | Lincoln | Lowell | Lowell | Walcott | Walcott | Ondaatje | Ondaatje | O.S. Card | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Description

Lecture eight in the Approaching Shakespeare series asks the question that structures Richard II: does the play suggest Henry Bolingbroke's overthrow of the king was justified? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Richard II | language | english literature | literary criticism | drama | literature | shakespeare | #greatwriters | Richard II | language | english literature | literary criticism | drama | literature | shakespeare | #greatwriters

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129168/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The life and death of King Richard the Second. (eBook)

Description

ePub version of text The life and death of King Richard the Second. / Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Richard II | language | english literature | literary criticism | drama | literature | shakespeare | epub | Richard II | language | english literature | literary criticism | drama | literature | shakespeare | epub

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129168/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

What is Comparative Literature?

Description

Dr Catherine Brown gives a special lecture on Comparative Literature. It reflects on the nature of comparison per se, and its position in the history and present practice of the subject of comparative literature.

Subjects

literature | great writers | comparative literature | #greatwriters | ukoer | literature | great writers | comparative literature | #greatwriters

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://rss.oucs.ox.ac.uk/engfac/lao-audio/rss20.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT) 21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT)

Description

This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic. This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic.

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Contemporary literature | Irish literature | Irish literature | Fiction | Fiction | Drama | Drama | Poetry | Poetry | Joyce | Joyce | Yeats | Yeats | Bolger | Bolger | Beckett | Beckett | O'Brien | O'Brien | Trevor | Trevor | Lavin | Lavin | McGahern | McGahern | Dorcey | Dorcey | Doyle | Doyle | Berkeley | Berkeley | Friel | Friel | Heaney | Heaney | Crotty | Crotty | Boland | Boland | Dhomhnaill | Dhomhnaill | Meehan | Meehan | Carr | Carr

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Adapting Greek Tragedy Adapting Greek Tragedy

Description

Fiona Macintosh talks with distinguished playwright Frank McGuinness about his work in adapting Greek tragedies for modern theatre, particularly Antigone and The Medea. Fiona Macintosh talks with distinguished playwright Frank McGuinness about his work in adapting Greek tragedies for modern theatre, particularly Antigone and The Medea.

Subjects

literature | literature | Euripides | Euripides | theatre | theatre | Medea | Medea | Antigone | Antigone | tragedy | tragedy | adaptation | adaptation | classics | classics | Sophocles | Sophocles | Bag Lady | Bag Lady | literature | Euripides | theatre | Medea | Antigone | tragedy | adaptation | classics | Sophocles | Bag Lady | 2009-11-24 | literature | Euripides | theatre | Medea | Antigone | tragedy | adaptation | classics | Sophocles | Bag Lady | 2009-11-24

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129065/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature appreciation | literature analysis | literature analysis | political theory | political theory | oratory | oratory | autobiography | autobiography | poetry | poetry | science fiction | science fiction | war | war | Renaissance | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Cort?s | Sahag?n | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Voltaire | Blake | Blake | Williams | Williams | Civil War | Civil War | abolition | abolition | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Lincoln | Lincoln | Lowell | Lowell | Walcott | Walcott | Ondaatje | Ondaatje | O.S. Card | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.422 Tragedy (MIT) 21L.422 Tragedy (MIT)

Description

"Tragedy" is a name originally applied to a particular kind of dramatic art and subsequently to other literary forms; it has also been applied to particular events, often implying thereby a particular view of life. Throughout the history of Western literature it has sustained this double reference. Uniquely and insistently, the realm of the tragic encompasses both literature and life.Through careful, critical reading of literary texts, this subject will examine three aspects of the tragic experience:    the scapegoatthe tragic herothe ethical crisisThese aspects of the tragic will be pursued in readings that range in the reference of their materials from the warfare of the ancient world to the experience of the modern extermination camps. "Tragedy" is a name originally applied to a particular kind of dramatic art and subsequently to other literary forms; it has also been applied to particular events, often implying thereby a particular view of life. Throughout the history of Western literature it has sustained this double reference. Uniquely and insistently, the realm of the tragic encompasses both literature and life.Through careful, critical reading of literary texts, this subject will examine three aspects of the tragic experience:    the scapegoatthe tragic herothe ethical crisisThese aspects of the tragic will be pursued in readings that range in the reference of their materials from the warfare of the ancient world to the experience of the modern extermination camps.

Subjects

literature | literature | tragedy | tragedy | western literature | western literature | critcal thought | critcal thought | ethics | ethics | ancient history | ancient history | modern | modern | war | war | sophocles | sophocles | euripides | euripides | plato | plato | shakespeare | shakespeare | balzac | balzac | melville | melville | conrad | conrad | ibsen | ibsen | fitzgerals | fitzgerals | dinesen | dinesen | camus | camus | literary theory | literary theory | nietzsche | nietzsche | coppolla | coppolla | power | power | scapegoat | scapegoat | hero | hero

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Utopia Utopia

Description

ebook version of Utopia ebook version of Utopia

Subjects

kind | kind | Fiction -- England -- 16th century | Fiction -- England -- 16th century | Fantasy literature -- England -- 16th century | Fantasy literature -- England -- 16th century | Utopian literature -- England -- 16th century | Utopian literature -- England -- 16th century | Essays -- England -- 16th century | Essays -- England -- 16th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://www.ota.ox.ac.uk/catalogue/epubfeed.rss

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21G.022J International Women's Voices (MIT) 21G.022J International Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom

Subjects

21G.022 | 21G.022 | WGS.141 | WGS.141 | Women | Women | International | International | Global | Global | Contemporary literature | Contemporary literature | Writers | Writers | Asia | Asia | Africa | Africa | Middle east | Middle east | Latin america | Latin america | North america | North america | Non-western | Non-western | Gender roles | Gender roles | Culture | Culture | Heritage | Heritage | Female | Female | History | History | Colonialism | Colonialism | Religion | Religion | Nationalism | Nationalism | Socialization | Socialization | Language | Language | Patriarchal | Patriarchal | Sex | Sex | Marriage | Marriage | Politics | Politics | Love | Love | Work | Work | Identity | Identity | Fiction | Fiction | literature | literature | SP.461J | SP.461J | WMN.461J | WMN.461J | SP.461 | SP.461 | WMN.461 | WMN.461

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

s Literature

Description

Dr Carolyne Larrington, Supernumerary Fellow and Tutor in English, St John's College, gives a talk to accompany the exhibition 'Magical Books: From The Middle Ages to Middle Earth'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | bodleian | norse | s literature | middle earth | myths | #greatwriters | s literature | middle earth | myths | #greatwriters | 2013-10-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129096/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

DH Lawrence 5. The Alps

Description

Catherine Brown gives the fifth lecture in the DH Lawrence series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

mountains | literature | nature | DH Lawrence | great writers | #greatwriters | mountains | literature | nature | DH Lawrence | great writers | #greatwriters

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129247/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

DH Lawrence 6. Birds, Beasts and Children

Description

Catherine Brown gives the sixth lecture in the DH Lawrence series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

DH Lawrence | sons and lovers | literature | women in love | #greatwriters | DH Lawrence | sons and lovers | literature | women in love | #greatwriters

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129247/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Old English in Context Lecture 1 - Historical texts

Description

Lecture by Dr S. D. Lee, Faculty of English, Oxford University - placing Old English literature in its historical and social context. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | england | medieval | old english | #greatwriters | english | anglo-saxon | literature | england | medieval | old english | #greatwriters | english | anglo-saxon | 2008-01-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/128978/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

DH Lawrence 7. Reception History

Description

Catherine Brown gives the Seventh and final lecture in the DH Lawrence series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | lawrence | great writers | sons and lovers | obscenity trial | women in love | #greatwriters | feminism | literature | lawrence | great writers | sons and lovers | obscenity trial | women in love | #greatwriters | feminism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129247/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Old English in Context Lecture 2 - Society

Description

Lecture delivered by Dr Stuart D Lee, 24/1/08, English Faculty, University of Oxford on Anglo-Saxon society in relation to the literature. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | england | medieval | old english | #greatwriters | english | anglo-saxon | literature | england | medieval | old english | #greatwriters | english | anglo-saxon | 2008-01-24

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/128978/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata