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6.867 Machine Learning (MIT) 6.867 Machine Learning (MIT)

Description

6.867 is an introductory course on machine learning which gives an overview of many concepts, techniques, and algorithms in machine learning, beginning with topics such as classification and linear regression and ending up with more recent topics such as boosting, support vector machines, hidden Markov models, and Bayesian networks. The course will give the student the basic ideas and intuition behind modern machine learning methods as well as a bit more formal understanding of how, why, and when they work. The underlying theme in the course is statistical inference as it provides the foundation for most of the methods covered. 6.867 is an introductory course on machine learning which gives an overview of many concepts, techniques, and algorithms in machine learning, beginning with topics such as classification and linear regression and ending up with more recent topics such as boosting, support vector machines, hidden Markov models, and Bayesian networks. The course will give the student the basic ideas and intuition behind modern machine learning methods as well as a bit more formal understanding of how, why, and when they work. The underlying theme in the course is statistical inference as it provides the foundation for most of the methods covered.

Subjects

machine learning algorithms | machine learning algorithms | statistical inference | statistical inference | representation | representation | generalization | generalization | model selection | model selection | linear/additive models | linear/additive models | active learning | active learning | boosting | boosting | support vector machines | support vector machines | hidden Markov models | hidden Markov models | Bayesian networks | Bayesian networks | classification | classification | linear regression | linear regression | modern machine learning methods | modern machine learning methods

License

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16.410 Principles of Autonomy and Decision Making (MIT) 16.410 Principles of Autonomy and Decision Making (MIT)

Description

This course surveys a variety of reasoning, optimization, and decision-making methodologies for creating highly autonomous systems and decision support aids. The focus is on principles, algorithms, and their applications, taken from the disciplines of artificial intelligence and operations research. Reasoning paradigms include logic and deduction, heuristic and constraint-based search, model-based reasoning, planning and execution, reasoning under uncertainty, and machine learning. Optimization paradigms include linear, integer and dynamic programming. Decision-making paradigms include decision theoretic planning, and Markov decision processes. This course is offered both to undergraduate (16.410) students as a professional area undergraduate subject, in the field of aerospace information This course surveys a variety of reasoning, optimization, and decision-making methodologies for creating highly autonomous systems and decision support aids. The focus is on principles, algorithms, and their applications, taken from the disciplines of artificial intelligence and operations research. Reasoning paradigms include logic and deduction, heuristic and constraint-based search, model-based reasoning, planning and execution, reasoning under uncertainty, and machine learning. Optimization paradigms include linear, integer and dynamic programming. Decision-making paradigms include decision theoretic planning, and Markov decision processes. This course is offered both to undergraduate (16.410) students as a professional area undergraduate subject, in the field of aerospace information

Subjects

autonomy | autonomy | decision | decision | decision-making | decision-making | reasoning | reasoning | optimization | optimization | autonomous | autonomous | autonomous systems | autonomous systems | decision support | decision support | algorithms | algorithms | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | a.i. | a.i. | operations | operations | operations research | operations research | logic | logic | deduction | deduction | heuristic search | heuristic search | constraint-based search | constraint-based search | model-based reasoning | model-based reasoning | planning | planning | execution | execution | uncertainty | uncertainty | machine learning | machine learning | linear programming | linear programming | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | integer programming | integer programming | network optimization | network optimization | decision analysis | decision analysis | decision theoretic planning | decision theoretic planning | Markov decision process | Markov decision process | scheme | scheme | propositional logic | propositional logic | constraints | constraints | Markov processes | Markov processes | computational performance | computational performance | satisfaction | satisfaction | learning algorithms | learning algorithms | system state | system state | state | state | search treees | search treees | plan spaces | plan spaces | model theory | model theory | decision trees | decision trees | function approximators | function approximators | optimization algorithms | optimization algorithms | limitations | limitations | tradeoffs | tradeoffs | search and reasoning | search and reasoning | game tree search | game tree search | local stochastic search | local stochastic search | stochastic | stochastic | genetic algorithms | genetic algorithms | constraint satisfaction | constraint satisfaction | propositional inference | propositional inference | rule-based systems | rule-based systems | rule-based | rule-based | model-based diagnosis | model-based diagnosis | neural nets | neural nets | reinforcement learning | reinforcement learning | web-based | web-based | search trees | search trees

License

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6.867 Machine Learning (MIT) 6.867 Machine Learning (MIT)

Description

6.867 is an introductory course on machine learning which provides an overview of many techniques and algorithms in machine learning, beginning with topics such as simple perceptrons and ending up with more recent topics such as boosting, support vector machines, hidden Markov models, and Bayesian networks. The course gives the student the basic ideas and intuition behind modern machine learning methods as well as a bit more formal understanding of how and why they work. The underlying theme in the course is statistical inference as this provides the foundation for most of the methods covered.  6.867 is an introductory course on machine learning which provides an overview of many techniques and algorithms in machine learning, beginning with topics such as simple perceptrons and ending up with more recent topics such as boosting, support vector machines, hidden Markov models, and Bayesian networks. The course gives the student the basic ideas and intuition behind modern machine learning methods as well as a bit more formal understanding of how and why they work. The underlying theme in the course is statistical inference as this provides the foundation for most of the methods covered. 

Subjects

machine learning | machine learning | perceptrons | perceptrons | boosting | boosting | support vector machines | support vector machines | Markov | Markov | hidden Markov models | hidden Markov models | HMM | HMM | Bayesian networks | Bayesian networks | statistical inference | statistical inference | regression | regression | clustering | clustering | bias | bias | variance | variance | regularization | regularization | Generalized Linear Models | Generalized Linear Models | neural networks | neural networks | Support Vector Machine | Support Vector Machine | SVM | SVM | mixture models | mixture models | kernel density estimation | kernel density estimation | gradient descent | gradient descent | quadratic programming | quadratic programming | EM algorithm | EM algorithm | orward-backward algorithm | orward-backward algorithm | junction tree algorithm | junction tree algorithm | Gibbs sampling | Gibbs sampling

License

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18.465 Topics in Statistics: Statistical Learning Theory (MIT) 18.465 Topics in Statistics: Statistical Learning Theory (MIT)

Description

The main goal of this course is to study the generalization ability of a number of popular machine learning algorithms such as boosting, support vector machines and neural networks. Topics include Vapnik-Chervonenkis theory, concentration inequalities in product spaces, and other elements of empirical process theory. The main goal of this course is to study the generalization ability of a number of popular machine learning algorithms such as boosting, support vector machines and neural networks. Topics include Vapnik-Chervonenkis theory, concentration inequalities in product spaces, and other elements of empirical process theory.

Subjects

machine learning algorithms | machine learning algorithms | boosting | boosting | support | support | support vector machines | support vector machines | neural networks | neural networks | Vapnik- Chervonenkis theory | Vapnik- Chervonenkis theory | concentration inequalities in product spaces | concentration inequalities in product spaces | empirical process theory | empirical process theory

License

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16.410 Principles of Autonomy and Decision Making (MIT) 16.410 Principles of Autonomy and Decision Making (MIT)

Description

This course surveys a variety of reasoning, optimization, and decision-making methodologies for creating highly autonomous systems and decision support aids. The focus is on principles, algorithms, and their applications, taken from the disciplines of artificial intelligence and operations research. Reasoning paradigms include logic and deduction, heuristic and constraint-based search, model-based reasoning, planning and execution, reasoning under uncertainty, and machine learning. Optimization paradigms include linear, integer and dynamic programming. Decision-making paradigms include decision theoretic planning, and Markov decision processes. This course is offered both to undergraduate (16.410) students as a professional area undergraduate subject, in the field of aerospace information This course surveys a variety of reasoning, optimization, and decision-making methodologies for creating highly autonomous systems and decision support aids. The focus is on principles, algorithms, and their applications, taken from the disciplines of artificial intelligence and operations research. Reasoning paradigms include logic and deduction, heuristic and constraint-based search, model-based reasoning, planning and execution, reasoning under uncertainty, and machine learning. Optimization paradigms include linear, integer and dynamic programming. Decision-making paradigms include decision theoretic planning, and Markov decision processes. This course is offered both to undergraduate (16.410) students as a professional area undergraduate subject, in the field of aerospace information

Subjects

autonomy | autonomy | decision | decision | decision-making | decision-making | reasoning | reasoning | optimization | optimization | autonomous | autonomous | autonomous systems | autonomous systems | decision support | decision support | algorithms | algorithms | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | a.i. | a.i. | operations | operations | operations research | operations research | logic | logic | deduction | deduction | heuristic search | heuristic search | constraint-based search | constraint-based search | model-based reasoning | model-based reasoning | planning | planning | execution | execution | uncertainty | uncertainty | machine learning | machine learning | linear programming | linear programming | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | integer programming | integer programming | network optimization | network optimization | decision analysis | decision analysis | decision theoretic planning | decision theoretic planning | Markov decision process | Markov decision process | scheme | scheme | propositional logic | propositional logic | constraints | constraints | Markov processes | Markov processes | computational performance | computational performance | satisfaction | satisfaction | learning algorithms | learning algorithms | system state | system state | state | state | search treees | search treees | plan spaces | plan spaces | model theory | model theory | decision trees | decision trees | function approximators | function approximators | optimization algorithms | optimization algorithms | limitations | limitations | tradeoffs | tradeoffs | search and reasoning | search and reasoning | game tree search | game tree search | local stochastic search | local stochastic search | stochastic | stochastic | genetic algorithms | genetic algorithms | constraint satisfaction | constraint satisfaction | propositional inference | propositional inference | rule-based systems | rule-based systems | rule-based | rule-based | model-based diagnosis | model-based diagnosis | neural nets | neural nets | reinforcement learning | reinforcement learning | web-based | web-based | search trees | search trees

License

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HST.512 Genomic Medicine (MIT) HST.512 Genomic Medicine (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course reviews the key genomic technologies and computational approaches that are driving advances in prognostics, diagnostics, and treatment. Throughout the semester, emphasis will return to issues surrounding the context of genomics in medicine including: what does a physician need to know? what sorts of questions will s/he likely encounter from patients? how should s/he respond? Lecturers will guide the student through real world patient-doctor interactions. Outcome considerations and socioeconomic implications of personalized medicine are also discussed. The first part of the course introduces key basic concepts of molecular biology, computational biology, and genomics. Continuing in the informatics applications portion of the course, lec Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course reviews the key genomic technologies and computational approaches that are driving advances in prognostics, diagnostics, and treatment. Throughout the semester, emphasis will return to issues surrounding the context of genomics in medicine including: what does a physician need to know? what sorts of questions will s/he likely encounter from patients? how should s/he respond? Lecturers will guide the student through real world patient-doctor interactions. Outcome considerations and socioeconomic implications of personalized medicine are also discussed. The first part of the course introduces key basic concepts of molecular biology, computational biology, and genomics. Continuing in the informatics applications portion of the course, lec

Subjects

genomics | genomics | genomic medicine | genomic medicine | genetics | genetics | genomic measurement | genomic measurement | microarray | microarray | informatics | informatics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | computational biology | computational biology | machine learning | machine learning | pharmacogenomics | pharmacogenomics | complex traits | complex traits | individual pharmacology | individual pharmacology | cancer diagnostics | cancer diagnostics | genetic disease | genetic disease | biomedical | biomedical | genomes | genomes | bioethics | bioethics | integrative genomics | integrative genomics | genomic technologies | genomic technologies

License

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6.047 Computational Biology: Genomes, Networks, Evolution (MIT) 6.047 Computational Biology: Genomes, Networks, Evolution (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the algorithmic and machine learning foundations of computational biology, combining theory with practice. We study the principles of algorithm design for biological datasets, and analyze influential problems and techniques. We use these to analyze real datasets from large-scale studies in genomics and proteomics. The topics covered include: Genomes: biological sequence analysis, hidden Markov models, gene finding, RNA folding, sequence alignment, genome assembly Networks: gene expression analysis, regulatory motifs, graph algorithms, scale-free networks, network motifs, network evolution Evolution: comparative genomics, phylogenetics, genome duplication, genome rearrangements, evolutionary theory, rapid evolution This course focuses on the algorithmic and machine learning foundations of computational biology, combining theory with practice. We study the principles of algorithm design for biological datasets, and analyze influential problems and techniques. We use these to analyze real datasets from large-scale studies in genomics and proteomics. The topics covered include: Genomes: biological sequence analysis, hidden Markov models, gene finding, RNA folding, sequence alignment, genome assembly Networks: gene expression analysis, regulatory motifs, graph algorithms, scale-free networks, network motifs, network evolution Evolution: comparative genomics, phylogenetics, genome duplication, genome rearrangements, evolutionary theory, rapid evolution

Subjects

computational biology | computational biology | algorithms | algorithms | machine learning | machine learning | biology | biology | biological datasets | biological datasets | genomics | genomics | proteomics | proteomics | genomes | genomes | sequence analysis | sequence analysis | sequence alignment | sequence alignment | genome assembly | genome assembly | network motifs | network motifs | network evolution | network evolution | graph algorithms | graph algorithms | phylogenetics | phylogenetics | comparative genomics | comparative genomics | python | python | probability | probability | statistics | statistics | entropy | entropy | information | information

License

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6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT) 6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject. This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.

Subjects

NLP | NLP | voice processing | voice processing | voice response | voice response | speech recognition | speech recognition | linguistics | linguistics | translation | translation | machine learning | machine learning | speech processing | speech processing | parsing | parsing | syntax | syntax | language model | language model | dialogue | dialogue | comprehension | comprehension | understanding | understanding | lexicon | lexicon | lexical | lexical | text processing | text processing | speech generation | speech generation

License

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6.096 Algorithms for Computational Biology (MIT) 6.096 Algorithms for Computational Biology (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to undergraduates and addresses several algorithmic challenges in computational biology. The principles of algorithmic design for biological datasets are studied and existing algorithms analyzed for application to real datasets. Topics covered include: biological sequence analysis, gene identification, regulatory motif discovery, genome assembly, genome duplication and rearrangements, evolutionary theory, clustering algorithms, and scale-free networks. This course is offered to undergraduates and addresses several algorithmic challenges in computational biology. The principles of algorithmic design for biological datasets are studied and existing algorithms analyzed for application to real datasets. Topics covered include: biological sequence analysis, gene identification, regulatory motif discovery, genome assembly, genome duplication and rearrangements, evolutionary theory, clustering algorithms, and scale-free networks.

Subjects

biological sequence analysis | biological sequence analysis | gene finding | gene finding | motif discovery | motif discovery | RNA folding | RNA folding | global and local sequence alignment | global and local sequence alignment | genome assembly | genome assembly | comparative genomics | comparative genomics | genome duplication | genome duplication | genome rearrangements | genome rearrangements | evolutionary theory | evolutionary theory | gene expression | gene expression | clustering algorithms | clustering algorithms | scale-free networks | scale-free networks | machine learning applications | machine learning applications

License

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6.092 Bioinformatics and Proteomics (MIT) 6.092 Bioinformatics and Proteomics (MIT)

Description

This interdisciplinary course provides a hands-on approach to students in the topics of bioinformatics and proteomics. Lectures and labs cover sequence analysis, microarray expression analysis, Bayesian methods, control theory, scale-free networks, and biotechnology applications. Designed for those with a computational and/or engineering background, it will include current real-world examples, actual implementations, and engineering design issues. Where applicable, engineering issues from signal processing, network theory, machine learning, robotics and other domains will be expounded upon. This interdisciplinary course provides a hands-on approach to students in the topics of bioinformatics and proteomics. Lectures and labs cover sequence analysis, microarray expression analysis, Bayesian methods, control theory, scale-free networks, and biotechnology applications. Designed for those with a computational and/or engineering background, it will include current real-world examples, actual implementations, and engineering design issues. Where applicable, engineering issues from signal processing, network theory, machine learning, robotics and other domains will be expounded upon.

Subjects

bioinformatics | bioinformatics | proteomics | proteomics | sequence analysis | sequence analysis | microarray expression analysis | microarray expression analysis | Bayesian methods | Bayesian methods | control theory | control theory | scale-free networks | scale-free networks | biotechnology applications | biotechnology applications | real-world examples | real-world examples | actual implementations | actual implementations | engineering design issues | engineering design issues | signal processing | signal processing | network theory | network theory | machine learning | machine learning | robotics | robotics

License

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6.892 Computational Models of Discourse (MIT) 6.892 Computational Models of Discourse (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate level introduction to automatic discourse processing. The emphasis will be on methods and models that have applicability to natural language and speech processing. The class will cover the following topics: discourse structure, models of coherence and cohesion, plan recognition algorithms, and text segmentation. We will study symbolic as well as machine learning methods for discourse analysis. We will also discuss the use of these methods in a variety of applications ranging from dialogue systems to automatic essay writing. This subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject. This course is a graduate level introduction to automatic discourse processing. The emphasis will be on methods and models that have applicability to natural language and speech processing. The class will cover the following topics: discourse structure, models of coherence and cohesion, plan recognition algorithms, and text segmentation. We will study symbolic as well as machine learning methods for discourse analysis. We will also discuss the use of these methods in a variety of applications ranging from dialogue systems to automatic essay writing. This subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.

Subjects

automatic discourse processing | automatic discourse processing | natural language | natural language | speech processing | speech processing | discourse structure | discourse structure | models of coherence and cohesion | models of coherence and cohesion | plan recognition algorithms | plan recognition algorithms | text segmentation | text segmentation | symbolic learning | symbolic learning | machine learning | machine learning | discourse analysis | discourse analysis | dialogue systems | dialogue systems | automatic essay writing | automatic essay writing

License

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9.66J Computational Cognitive Science (MIT) 9.66J Computational Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to computational theories of human cognition. Drawing on formal models from classic and contemporary artificial intelligence, students will explore fundamental issues in human knowledge representation, inductive learning and reasoning. What are the forms that our knowledge of the world takes? What are the inductive principles that allow us to acquire new knowledge from the interaction of prior knowledge with observed data? What kinds of data must be available to human learners, and what kinds of innate knowledge (if any) must they have? This course is an introduction to computational theories of human cognition. Drawing on formal models from classic and contemporary artificial intelligence, students will explore fundamental issues in human knowledge representation, inductive learning and reasoning. What are the forms that our knowledge of the world takes? What are the inductive principles that allow us to acquire new knowledge from the interaction of prior knowledge with observed data? What kinds of data must be available to human learners, and what kinds of innate knowledge (if any) must they have?

Subjects

computational theory | computational theory | human cognition | human cognition | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | human knowledge representation | human knowledge representation | inductive learning | inductive learning | inductive reasoning | inductive reasoning | innate knowledge | innate knowledge | machine learning | machine learning | cognitive science | cognitive science | computational cognitive science | computational cognitive science | 9.66 | 9.66 | 6.804 | 6.804

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15.097 Prediction: Machine Learning and Statistics (MIT) 15.097 Prediction: Machine Learning and Statistics (MIT)

Description

Prediction is at the heart of almost every scientific discipline, and the study of generalization (that is, prediction) from data is the central topic of machine learning and statistics, and more generally, data mining. Machine learning and statistical methods are used throughout the scientific world for their use in handling the "information overload" that characterizes our current digital age. Machine learning developed from the artificial intelligence community, mainly within the last 30 years, at the same time that statistics has made major advances due to the availability of modern computing. However, parts of these two fields aim at the same goal, that is, of prediction from data. This course provides a selection of the most important topics from both of these subjects. Prediction is at the heart of almost every scientific discipline, and the study of generalization (that is, prediction) from data is the central topic of machine learning and statistics, and more generally, data mining. Machine learning and statistical methods are used throughout the scientific world for their use in handling the "information overload" that characterizes our current digital age. Machine learning developed from the artificial intelligence community, mainly within the last 30 years, at the same time that statistics has made major advances due to the availability of modern computing. However, parts of these two fields aim at the same goal, that is, of prediction from data. This course provides a selection of the most important topics from both of these subjects.

Subjects

prediction | prediction | machine learning | machine learning | statistics | statistics | data mining | data mining | algorithms | algorithms | statistical learning theory | statistical learning theory | Bayesian analysis | Bayesian analysis | top 10 algorithms | top 10 algorithms | support vector machines | support vector machines | boosting | boosting

License

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16.410 Principles of Autonomy and Decision Making (MIT) 16.410 Principles of Autonomy and Decision Making (MIT)

Description

This course surveys a variety of reasoning, optimization and decision making methodologies for creating highly autonomous systems and decision support aids. The focus is on principles, algorithms, and their application, taken from the disciplines of artificial intelligence and operations research. Reasoning paradigms include logic and deduction, heuristic and constraint-based search, model-based reasoning, planning and execution, and machine learning. Optimization paradigms include linear programming, integer programming, and dynamic programming. Decision-making paradigms include decision theoretic planning, and Markov decision processes. This course surveys a variety of reasoning, optimization and decision making methodologies for creating highly autonomous systems and decision support aids. The focus is on principles, algorithms, and their application, taken from the disciplines of artificial intelligence and operations research. Reasoning paradigms include logic and deduction, heuristic and constraint-based search, model-based reasoning, planning and execution, and machine learning. Optimization paradigms include linear programming, integer programming, and dynamic programming. Decision-making paradigms include decision theoretic planning, and Markov decision processes.

Subjects

state space search | state space search | constraints | constraints | planning | planning | model based reasoning | model based reasoning | global path planning | global path planning | mathematical programming | mathematical programming | hidden markov models | hidden markov models | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | machine learning | machine learning | game theory | game theory

License

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18.465 Topics in Statistics: Statistical Learning Theory (MIT) 18.465 Topics in Statistics: Statistical Learning Theory (MIT)

Description

The main goal of this course is to study the generalization ability of a number of popular machine learning algorithms such as boosting, support vector machines and neural networks. Topics include Vapnik-Chervonenkis theory, concentration inequalities in product spaces, and other elements of empirical process theory. The main goal of this course is to study the generalization ability of a number of popular machine learning algorithms such as boosting, support vector machines and neural networks. Topics include Vapnik-Chervonenkis theory, concentration inequalities in product spaces, and other elements of empirical process theory.

Subjects

machine learning algorithms | machine learning algorithms | boosting | boosting | support | support | support vector machines | support vector machines | neural networks | neural networks | Vapnik- Chervonenkis theory | Vapnik- Chervonenkis theory | concentration inequalities in product spaces | concentration inequalities in product spaces | empirical process theory | empirical process theory

License

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HST.951J Medical Decision Support (MIT) HST.951J Medical Decision Support (MIT)

Description

This course presents the main concepts of decision analysis, artificial intelligence, and predictive model construction and evaluation in the specific context of medical applications. The advantages and disadvantages of using these methods in real-world systems are emphasized, while students gain hands-on experience with application specific methods. The technical focus of the course includes decision analysis, knowledge-based systems (qualitative and quantitative), learning systems (including logistic regression, classification trees, neural networks), and techniques to evaluate the performance of such systems. This course presents the main concepts of decision analysis, artificial intelligence, and predictive model construction and evaluation in the specific context of medical applications. The advantages and disadvantages of using these methods in real-world systems are emphasized, while students gain hands-on experience with application specific methods. The technical focus of the course includes decision analysis, knowledge-based systems (qualitative and quantitative), learning systems (including logistic regression, classification trees, neural networks), and techniques to evaluate the performance of such systems.

Subjects

HST.951 | HST.951 | 6.873 | 6.873 | decision analysis | decision analysis | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | predictive model construction | predictive model construction | evaluation | evaluation | medical software | medical software | decision support | decision support | knowledge-based systems | knowledge-based systems | learning systems | learning systems | logistic regression | logistic regression | classification trees | classification trees | neural networks | neural networks | rough sets | rough sets | computer-based diagnosis | computer-based diagnosis | planning monitoring | planning monitoring | therapeutic interventions | therapeutic interventions | machine learning methods | machine learning methods

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HST.951J Medical Decision Support (MIT) HST.951J Medical Decision Support (MIT)

Description

This course presents the main concepts of decision analysis, artificial intelligence and predictive model construction and evaluation in the specific context of medical applications. It emphasizes the advantages and disadvantages of using these methods in real-world systems and provides hands-on experience. Its technical focus is on decision support, knowledge-based systems (qualitative and quantitative), learning systems (including logistic regression, classification trees, neural networks, rough sets), and techniques to evaluate the performance of such systems. It reviews computer-based diagnosis, planning and monitoring of therapeutic interventions. It also discusses implemented medical applications and the software tools used in their construction. Students produce a final project usin This course presents the main concepts of decision analysis, artificial intelligence and predictive model construction and evaluation in the specific context of medical applications. It emphasizes the advantages and disadvantages of using these methods in real-world systems and provides hands-on experience. Its technical focus is on decision support, knowledge-based systems (qualitative and quantitative), learning systems (including logistic regression, classification trees, neural networks, rough sets), and techniques to evaluate the performance of such systems. It reviews computer-based diagnosis, planning and monitoring of therapeutic interventions. It also discusses implemented medical applications and the software tools used in their construction. Students produce a final project usin

Subjects

decision analysis | decision analysis | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | predictive model construction | predictive model construction | evaluation | evaluation | medical software | medical software | decision support | decision support | knowledge-based systems | knowledge-based systems | learning systems | learning systems | logistic regression | logistic regression | classification trees | classification trees | neural networks | neural networks | rough sets | rough sets | computer-based diagnosis | computer-based diagnosis | planning monitoring | planning monitoring | therapeutic interventions | therapeutic interventions | machine learning methods | machine learning methods | HST.951 | HST.951 | 6.873 | 6.873

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.867 Machine Learning (MIT)

Description

6.867 is an introductory course on machine learning which gives an overview of many concepts, techniques, and algorithms in machine learning, beginning with topics such as classification and linear regression and ending up with more recent topics such as boosting, support vector machines, hidden Markov models, and Bayesian networks. The course will give the student the basic ideas and intuition behind modern machine learning methods as well as a bit more formal understanding of how, why, and when they work. The underlying theme in the course is statistical inference as it provides the foundation for most of the methods covered.

Subjects

machine learning algorithms | statistical inference | representation | generalization | model selection | linear/additive models | active learning | boosting | support vector machines | hidden Markov models | Bayesian networks | classification | linear regression | modern machine learning methods

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.S66 Indistinguishable From... Magic as Interface, Technology, and Tradition (MIT) MAS.S66 Indistinguishable From... Magic as Interface, Technology, and Tradition (MIT)

Description

With a focus on the creation of functional prototypes and practicing real magical crafts, this class combines theatrical illusion, game design, sleight of hand, machine learning, camouflage, and neuroscience to explore how ideas from ancient magic and modern stage illusion can inform cutting edge technology. With a focus on the creation of functional prototypes and practicing real magical crafts, this class combines theatrical illusion, game design, sleight of hand, machine learning, camouflage, and neuroscience to explore how ideas from ancient magic and modern stage illusion can inform cutting edge technology.

Subjects

magic | magic | technology | technology | illusion | illusion | ritual | ritual | performance | performance | design | design | interface | interface | game design | game design | machine learning | machine learning | neuroscience | neuroscience | tricks | tricks | design exercise | design exercise | deception | deception | bots | bots | user experience | user experience

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.047 Computational Biology (MIT) 6.047 Computational Biology (MIT)

Description

This course covers the algorithmic and machine learning foundations of computational biology combining theory with practice. We cover both foundational topics in computational biology, and current research frontiers. We study fundamental techniques, recent advances in the field, and work directly with current large-scale biological datasets. This course covers the algorithmic and machine learning foundations of computational biology combining theory with practice. We cover both foundational topics in computational biology, and current research frontiers. We study fundamental techniques, recent advances in the field, and work directly with current large-scale biological datasets.

Subjects

Genomes | Genomes | Networks | Networks | Evolution | Evolution | computational biology | computational biology | genomics | genomics | comparative genomics | comparative genomics | epigenomics | epigenomics | functional genomics | motifs | functional genomics | motifs | phylogenomics | phylogenomics | personal genomics | personal genomics | algorithms | algorithms | machine learning | machine learning | biology | biology | biological datasets | biological datasets | proteomics | proteomics | sequence analysis | sequence analysis | sequence alignment | sequence alignment | genome assembly | genome assembly | network motifs | network motifs | network evolution | network evolution | graph algorithms | graph algorithms | phylogenetics | phylogenetics | python | python | probability | probability | statistics | statistics | entropy | entropy | information | information

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.867 Machine Learning (MIT)

Description

6.867 is an introductory course on machine learning which gives an overview of many concepts, techniques, and algorithms in machine learning, beginning with topics such as classification and linear regression and ending up with more recent topics such as boosting, support vector machines, hidden Markov models, and Bayesian networks. The course will give the student the basic ideas and intuition behind modern machine learning methods as well as a bit more formal understanding of how, why, and when they work. The underlying theme in the course is statistical inference as it provides the foundation for most of the methods covered.

Subjects

machine learning algorithms | statistical inference | representation | generalization | model selection | linear/additive models | active learning | boosting | support vector machines | hidden Markov models | Bayesian networks | classification | linear regression | modern machine learning methods

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Machine Learning I Machine Learning I

Description

The main goals of this course are: to introduce the basic concepts of Machine Learning and Big Data Machine Learning; to describe the main areas, techniques, and processes in Machine Learning; to introduce some of the main tools in (Big Data) Machine Learning The main goals of this course are: to introduce the basic concepts of Machine Learning and Big Data Machine Learning; to describe the main areas, techniques, and processes in Machine Learning; to introduce some of the main tools in (Big Data) Machine Learning

Subjects

Nearest neighbours | Nearest neighbours | Models for regression | Models for regression | MLLIB | MLLIB | Gradient Boosting | Gradient Boosting | Bagging | Bagging | Hyper-parameter optimization | Hyper-parameter optimization | Pyspark | Pyspark | Large scale machine learning | Large scale machine learning | Boosting | Boosting | Spark | Spark | 2016 | 2016 | Random Forests | Random Forests | Machine learning | Machine learning | Decision / regression trees and rules | Decision / regression trees and rules | Feature selection | Feature selection | Model evaluation | Model evaluation | Feature transformation | Feature transformation | ML | ML | Basic pipeline | Basic pipeline | Models for classification | Models for classification | MapReduce | MapReduce | C. Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial | C. Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial | Dimensionality reduction | Dimensionality reduction

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.

Subjects

NLP | voice processing | voice response | speech recognition | linguistics | translation | machine learning | speech processing | parsing | syntax | language model | dialogue | comprehension | understanding | lexicon | lexical | text processing | speech generation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.951J Medical Decision Support (MIT)

Description

This course presents the main concepts of decision analysis, artificial intelligence and predictive model construction and evaluation in the specific context of medical applications. It emphasizes the advantages and disadvantages of using these methods in real-world systems and provides hands-on experience. Its technical focus is on decision support, knowledge-based systems (qualitative and quantitative), learning systems (including logistic regression, classification trees, neural networks, rough sets), and techniques to evaluate the performance of such systems. It reviews computer-based diagnosis, planning and monitoring of therapeutic interventions. It also discusses implemented medical applications and the software tools used in their construction. Students produce a final project usin

Subjects

decision analysis | artificial intelligence | predictive model construction | evaluation | medical software | decision support | knowledge-based systems | learning systems | logistic regression | classification trees | neural networks | rough sets | computer-based diagnosis | planning monitoring | therapeutic interventions | machine learning methods | HST.951 | 6.873

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Artificial Intelligence

Description

This course includes materials on AI programming, logic, search, game playing, machine learning, natural language understanding, and robotics, which will introduce the student to AI methods, tools, and techniques, their application to computational problems, and their contribution to understanding intelligence. The material is introductory; the readings cite many resources outside those assigned in this course, and students are encouraged to explore these resources to pursue topics of interest. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Computer Science 405)

Subjects

ai | logic | machine learning | heuristics | computing | natural language | semantics | robotics | Computer science | I100

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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