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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT) 8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to physics of the solar system, stars, interstellar medium, the galaxy, and universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.Topics include: planets, planet formation; stars, the Sun, "normal" stars, star formation; stellar evolution, supernovae, compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), plusars, binary X-ray sources; star clusters, globular and open clusters; interstellar medium, gas, dust, magnetic fields, cosmic rays; distance ladder; galaxies, normal and active galaxies, jets; gravitational lensing; large scaling structure; Newtonian cosmology, dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe; cosmic microwave background radiation; big-bang nucleosynthesis Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to physics of the solar system, stars, interstellar medium, the galaxy, and universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.Topics include: planets, planet formation; stars, the Sun, "normal" stars, star formation; stellar evolution, supernovae, compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), plusars, binary X-ray sources; star clusters, globular and open clusters; interstellar medium, gas, dust, magnetic fields, cosmic rays; distance ladder; galaxies, normal and active galaxies, jets; gravitational lensing; large scaling structure; Newtonian cosmology, dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe; cosmic microwave background radiation; big-bang nucleosynthesis

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | solar system | stars | stars | interstellar medium | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Galaxy | the Universe | the Universe | planets | planets | planet formation | planet formation | star formation | star formation | stellar evolution | stellar evolution | supernovae | supernovae | compact objects | compact objects | white dwarfs | white dwarfs | neutron stars | neutron stars | black holes | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | star clusters | globular and open clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | binary X-ray sources | gas | gas | dust | dust | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | cosmic rays | galaxy | galaxy | universe | universe | astrophysics | astrophysics | Sun | Sun | supernova | supernova | globular clusters | globular clusters | open clusters | open clusters | jets | jets | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | dynamical expansion | thermal history | thermal history | normal galaxies | normal galaxies | active galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | Greek astronomy | physics | physics | Copernicus | Copernicus | Tycho | Tycho | Kepler | Kepler | Galileo | Galileo | classical mechanics | classical mechanics | circular orbits | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | electromagnetic radiation | matter | matter | telescopes | telescopes | detectors | detectors | 8.282 | 8.282 | 12.402 | 12.402

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT) 8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models. Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | solar system | stars | stars | interstellar medium | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Galaxy | the Universe | the Universe | planets | planets | planet formation | planet formation | star formation | star formation | stellar evolution | stellar evolution | supernovae | supernovae | compact objects | compact objects | white dwarfs | white dwarfs | neutron stars | neutron stars | black holes | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | star clusters | globular and open clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | binary X-ray sources | gas | gas | dust | dust | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | cosmic rays | galaxy | galaxy | universe | universe | astrophysics | astrophysics | Sun | Sun | supernova | supernova | globular clusters | globular clusters | open clusters | open clusters | jets | jets | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | dynamical expansion | thermal history | thermal history | normal galaxies | normal galaxies | active galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | Greek astronomy | physics | physics | Copernicus | Copernicus | Tycho | Tycho | Kepler | Kepler | Galileo | Galileo | classical mechanics | classical mechanics | circular orbits | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | electromagnetic radiation | matter | matter | telescopes | telescopes | detectors | detectors | 8.282 | 8.282 | 12.402 | 12.402 | plusars | plusars | galaxies | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | normal and active galaxies | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe

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22.611J Introduction to Plasma Physics I (MIT) 22.611J Introduction to Plasma Physics I (MIT)

Description

In this course, students will learn about plasmas, the fourth state of matter. The plasma state dominates the visible universe, and is of increasing economic importance. Plasmas behave in lots of interesting and sometimes unexpected ways. The course is intended only as a first plasma physics course, but includes critical concepts needed for a foundation for further study. A solid undergraduate background in classical physics, electromagnetic theory including Maxwell's equations, and mathematical familiarity with partial differential equations and complex analysis are prerequisites. The course introduces plasma phenomena relevant to energy generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion and to astrophysics, coulomb collisions and transport processes, motion of charged particles in magne In this course, students will learn about plasmas, the fourth state of matter. The plasma state dominates the visible universe, and is of increasing economic importance. Plasmas behave in lots of interesting and sometimes unexpected ways. The course is intended only as a first plasma physics course, but includes critical concepts needed for a foundation for further study. A solid undergraduate background in classical physics, electromagnetic theory including Maxwell's equations, and mathematical familiarity with partial differential equations and complex analysis are prerequisites. The course introduces plasma phenomena relevant to energy generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion and to astrophysics, coulomb collisions and transport processes, motion of charged particles in magne

Subjects

plasma phenomena | plasma phenomena | energy generation | energy generation | controlled thermonuclear fusion | controlled thermonuclear fusion | astrophysics | astrophysics | Coulomb collisions | Coulomb collisions | transport processes | transport processes | charged particles | charged particles | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | plasma confinement schemes | plasma confinement schemes | MHD models | MHD models | simple equilibrium | simple equilibrium | stability analysis | stability analysis | Two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | Two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | wave propagation | wave propagation | kinetic theory | kinetic theory | Vlasov plasma model | Vlasov plasma model | electron plasma waves | electron plasma waves | Landau damping | Landau damping | ion-acoustic waves | ion-acoustic waves | streaming instabilities | streaming instabilities | fourth state of matter | fourth state of matter | plasma state | plasma state | visible universe | visible universe | economics | economics | plasmas | plasmas | motion of charged particles | motion of charged particles | two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | Debye Shielding | Debye Shielding | collective effects | collective effects | charged particle motion | charged particle motion | EM Fields | EM Fields | cross-sections | cross-sections | relaxation | relaxation | fluid plasma descriptions | fluid plasma descriptions | MHD equilibrium | MHD equilibrium | MHD dynamics | MHD dynamics | dynamics in two-fluid plasmas | dynamics in two-fluid plasmas | cold plasma waves | cold plasma waves | magnetic field | magnetic field | microscopic to fluid plasma descriptions | microscopic to fluid plasma descriptions | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory.linear Landau growth | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory.linear Landau growth | kinetic description of waves | kinetic description of waves | instabilities | instabilities | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory | linear Landau growth | linear Landau growth | 22.611 | 22.611 | 6.651 | 6.651 | 8.613 | 8.613

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | stars | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Universe | planets | planet formation | star formation | stellar evolution | supernovae | compact objects | white dwarfs | neutron stars | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | galaxy | universe | astrophysics | Sun | supernova | globular clusters | open clusters | jets | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | thermal history | normal galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | physics | Copernicus | Tycho | Kepler | Galileo | classical mechanics | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | matter | telescopes | detectors | 8.282 | 12.402 | plusars | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to physics of the solar system, stars, interstellar medium, the galaxy, and universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.Topics include: planets, planet formation; stars, the Sun, "normal" stars, star formation; stellar evolution, supernovae, compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), plusars, binary X-ray sources; star clusters, globular and open clusters; interstellar medium, gas, dust, magnetic fields, cosmic rays; distance ladder; galaxies, normal and active galaxies, jets; gravitational lensing; large scaling structure; Newtonian cosmology, dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe; cosmic microwave background radiation; big-bang nucleosynthesis

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | stars | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Universe | planets | planet formation | star formation | stellar evolution | supernovae | compact objects | white dwarfs | neutron stars | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | galaxy | universe | astrophysics | Sun | supernova | globular clusters | open clusters | jets | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | thermal history | normal galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | physics | Copernicus | Tycho | Kepler | Galileo | classical mechanics | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | matter | telescopes | detectors | 8.282 | 12.402

License

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | stars | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Universe | planets | planet formation | star formation | stellar evolution | supernovae | compact objects | white dwarfs | neutron stars | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | galaxy | universe | astrophysics | Sun | supernova | globular clusters | open clusters | jets | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | thermal history | normal galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | physics | Copernicus | Tycho | Kepler | Galileo | classical mechanics | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | matter | telescopes | detectors | 8.282 | 12.402 | plusars | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe

License

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6.061 Introduction to Electric Power Systems (MIT) 6.061 Introduction to Electric Power Systems (MIT)

Description

This course is an introductory subject in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Electric power has become increasingly important as a way of transmitting and transforming energy in industrial, military and transportation uses. Examples of new uses for electric power include all manners of electric transportation systems (electric trains that run under catenary, diesel-electric railroad locomotion, 'maglev' medium and high speed tracked vehicles, electric transmission systems for ships, replacement of hydraulics in high performance actuators, aircraft launch and recovery systems, battery powered factory material transport systems, electric and hybrid electric cars and buses, even the 'more electric' airplane). The material in this subject w This course is an introductory subject in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Electric power has become increasingly important as a way of transmitting and transforming energy in industrial, military and transportation uses. Examples of new uses for electric power include all manners of electric transportation systems (electric trains that run under catenary, diesel-electric railroad locomotion, 'maglev' medium and high speed tracked vehicles, electric transmission systems for ships, replacement of hydraulics in high performance actuators, aircraft launch and recovery systems, battery powered factory material transport systems, electric and hybrid electric cars and buses, even the 'more electric' airplane). The material in this subject w

Subjects

electric power | electric power | electric power system | electric power system | electric circuits | electric circuits | electromechanical apparatus | electromechanical apparatus | magnetic field devices | magnetic field devices | transformation techniques | transformation techniques | magnetic circuits | magnetic circuits | lumped parameter electromechanics | lumped parameter electromechanics | linear electric machinery | linear electric machinery | rotating electric machinery | rotating electric machinery | synchronous machinery | synchronous machinery | induction machinery | induction machinery | dc machinery. | dc machinery. | mechanical energy conversion | mechanical energy conversion | energy | energy | new applications | new applications

License

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6.061 Introduction to Electric Power Systems (MIT) 6.061 Introduction to Electric Power Systems (MIT)

Description

This course is offered both to undergraduates (6.061) and graduates (6.979), where the graduate version has different problem sets and an additional term project. 6.061 / 6.979 is an introductory course in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Material encountered in the subject includes: Fundamentals of energy-handling electric circuits and electromechanical apparatus. Modeling of magnetic field devices and description of their behavior using appropriate models. Simplification of problems using transformation techniques. Power electric circuits, magnetic circuits, lumped parameter electromechanics, elements of linear and rotating electric machinery. Modeling of synchronous, induction and dc machinery. The course uses examples from current rese This course is offered both to undergraduates (6.061) and graduates (6.979), where the graduate version has different problem sets and an additional term project. 6.061 / 6.979 is an introductory course in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Material encountered in the subject includes: Fundamentals of energy-handling electric circuits and electromechanical apparatus. Modeling of magnetic field devices and description of their behavior using appropriate models. Simplification of problems using transformation techniques. Power electric circuits, magnetic circuits, lumped parameter electromechanics, elements of linear and rotating electric machinery. Modeling of synchronous, induction and dc machinery. The course uses examples from current rese

Subjects

electric power | electric power | electric power system | electric power system | electric circuits | electric circuits | electromechanical apparatus | electromechanical apparatus | magnetic field devices | magnetic field devices | transformation techniques | transformation techniques | magnetic circuits | magnetic circuits | lumped parameter electromechanics | lumped parameter electromechanics | linear electric machinery | linear electric machinery | rotating electric machinery | rotating electric machinery | synchronous machinery | synchronous machinery | induction machinery | induction machinery | dc machinery. | dc machinery. | mechanical energy conversion | mechanical energy conversion | energy | energy | new applications | new applications | dc machinery | dc machinery

License

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8.033 Relativity (MIT) 8.033 Relativity (MIT)

Description

Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay. Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay.

Subjects

Einstein's postulates | Einstein's postulates | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | Lorentz transformation | Lorentz transformation | relativistic effects and paradoxes | relativistic effects and paradoxes | Minkowski diagrams | Minkowski diagrams | invariants and four-vectors | invariants and four-vectors | momentum | energy and mass | momentum | energy and mass | particle collisions | particle collisions | Relativity and electricity | Relativity and electricity | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | General Relativity | General Relativity | principle of equivalence | principle of equivalence | the Schwarzchild metric | the Schwarzchild metric | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | gravitational red shift | particle trajectories | particle trajectories | light trajectories | light trajectories | invariants | invariants | four-vectors | four-vectors | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | mass | mass | relativistic effects | relativistic effects | paradoxes | paradoxes | electricity | electricity | time dilation | time dilation | length contraction | length contraction | clock synchronization | clock synchronization | Schwarzchild metric | Schwarzchild metric | geodesics | geodesics | Shaprio delay | Shaprio delay | relativistic kinematics | relativistic kinematics | relativistic dynamics | relativistic dynamics | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | hubble expansion | hubble expansion | universe | universe | equivalence principle | equivalence principle | curved space time | curved space time | Ether Theory | Ether Theory | constants | constants | speed of light | speed of light | c | c | graph | graph | pythagorem theorem | pythagorem theorem | triangle | triangle | arrows | arrows

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6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT) 6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. 6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | electromagnetic field | forces | forces | motion | motion | electric | electric | magnetic | magnetic | quasistatic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | dielectric | conduction | conduction | magnetization | magnetization | boundary value problems | boundary value problems | force densities | force densities | stress tensors | stress tensors | polarization | polarization | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | equations of motion | equations of motion | energy conservation | energy conservation | synchronous | synchronous | induction | induction | commutator machines | commutator machines | sensors | sensors | transducers | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena | charge transport phenomena

License

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6.763 Applied Superconductivity (MIT) 6.763 Applied Superconductivity (MIT)

Description

This course provides a phenomenological approach to superconductivity, with emphasis on superconducting electronics. Topics include: electrodynamics of superconductors, London's model, flux quantization, Josephson Junctions, superconducting quantum devices, equivalent circuits, high-speed superconducting electronics, and quantized circuits for quantum computing. The course also provides an overview of type II superconductors, critical magnetic fields, pinning, the critical state model, superconducting materials, and microscopic theory of superconductivity.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc. This course provides a phenomenological approach to superconductivity, with emphasis on superconducting electronics. Topics include: electrodynamics of superconductors, London's model, flux quantization, Josephson Junctions, superconducting quantum devices, equivalent circuits, high-speed superconducting electronics, and quantized circuits for quantum computing. The course also provides an overview of type II superconductors, critical magnetic fields, pinning, the critical state model, superconducting materials, and microscopic theory of superconductivity.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc.

Subjects

applied superconductivity | applied superconductivity | superconducting electronics | superconducting electronics | electrodynamics of superconductors | electrodynamics of superconductors | London's model | London's model | flux quantization | flux quantization | Josephson Junctions | Josephson Junctions | superconducting quantum devices | superconducting quantum devices | equivalent circuits | equivalent circuits | high-speed superconducting electronics | high-speed superconducting electronics | quantized circuits | quantized circuits | quantum computing | quantum computing | type II superconductors | type II superconductors | critical magnetic fields | critical magnetic fields | pinning | pinning | the critical state model | the critical state model | superconducting materials | superconducting materials | microscopic theory of superconductivity | microscopic theory of superconductivity | Electric conductivity | Electric conductivity

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8.07 Electromagnetism II (MIT) 8.07 Electromagnetism II (MIT)

Description

Survey of basic electromagnetic phenomena: electrostatics, magnetostatics, electromagnetic properties of matter. Time-dependent electromagnetic fields and Maxwell's equations. Electromagnetic waves, emission, absorption, and scattering of radiation. Relativistic electrodynamics and mechanics. Survey of basic electromagnetic phenomena: electrostatics, magnetostatics, electromagnetic properties of matter. Time-dependent electromagnetic fields and Maxwell's equations. Electromagnetic waves, emission, absorption, and scattering of radiation. Relativistic electrodynamics and mechanics.

Subjects

electromagnetic phenomena | electromagnetic phenomena | electrostatics | electrostatics | magnetostatics | magnetostatics | electromagnetic properties of matter | electromagnetic properties of matter | Time-dependent electromagnetic fields and Maxwell's equations | Time-dependent electromagnetic fields and Maxwell's equations | Electromagnetic waves | Electromagnetic waves | emission | emission | absorption | absorption | scattering of radiation | scattering of radiation | Relativistic electrodynamics | Relativistic electrodynamics | mechanics | mechanics

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8.06 Quantum Physics III (MIT) 8.06 Quantum Physics III (MIT)

Description

This course is a continuation of 8.05, Quantum Physics II. Content includes:Natural UnitsCharged particles in a magnetic fieldTime-independent perturbation theoryVariational and semi-classical methodsQuantum ComputingThe adiabatic approximation and Berry’s phaseScatteringTime-dependent perturbation theory This course is a continuation of 8.05, Quantum Physics II. Content includes:Natural UnitsCharged particles in a magnetic fieldTime-independent perturbation theoryVariational and semi-classical methodsQuantum ComputingThe adiabatic approximation and Berry’s phaseScatteringTime-dependent perturbation theory

Subjects

natural units | natural units | scales of microscopic phenomena | scales of microscopic phenomena | Time-independent approximation methods: degenerate and non-degenerate perturbation theory | Time-independent approximation methods: degenerate and non-degenerate perturbation theory | variational method | variational method | Born-Oppenheimer approximation | Born-Oppenheimer approximation | spin-orbit and relativistic corrections | spin-orbit and relativistic corrections | Zeeman and Stark effects | Zeeman and Stark effects | Charged particles in a magnetic field | Charged particles in a magnetic field | Landau levels | Landau levels | integer quantum hall effect | integer quantum hall effect | Scattering | Scattering | partial waves | partial waves | Born approximation | Born approximation | Time-dependent perturbation theory | Time-dependent perturbation theory | quantum physics | quantum physics

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RES.6-010 Electronic Feedback Systems (MIT) RES.6-010 Electronic Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Feedback control is an important technique that is used in many modern electronic and electromechanical systems. The successful inclusion of this technique improves performance, reliability, and cost effectiveness of many designs. In this series of lectures we introduce the analytical concepts that underlie classical feedback system design. The application of these concepts is illustrated by a variety of experiments and demonstration systems. The diversity of the demonstration systems reinforces the value of the analytic methods. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Feedback control is an important technique that is used in many modern electronic and electromechanical systems. The successful inclusion of this technique improves performance, reliability, and cost effectiveness of many designs. In this series of lectures we introduce the analytical concepts that underlie classical feedback system design. The application of these concepts is illustrated by a variety of experiments and demonstration systems. The diversity of the demonstration systems reinforces the value of the analytic methods.

Subjects

electronic feedback systems | electronic feedback systems | operational amplifiers | operational amplifiers | electromagnetic fields | electromagnetic fields | stability | stability | root locus | root locus | feedback compensation | feedback compensation | nonlinearities | nonlinearities | system dynamics | system dynamics

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6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT) 6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgments The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen and Matthew Pegler for transcribing into LaTeX the homework problems, homework solutions, and Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgments The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen and Matthew Pegler for transcribing into LaTeX the homework problems, homework solutions, and

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | electromagnetic field | forces | forces | motion | motion | electric | electric | magnetic | magnetic | quasistatic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | dielectric | conduction | conduction | magnetization | magnetization | boundary value problems | boundary value problems | force densities | force densities | stress tensors | stress tensors | polarization | polarization | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | equations of motion | equations of motion | energy conservation | energy conservation | synchronous | synchronous | induction | induction | commutator machines | commutator machines | sensors | sensors | transducers | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena | charge transport phenomena

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6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT) 6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless and optical communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals include quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided waves; resonance; acoustic analogs; and forces, power, and energy. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless and optical communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals include quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided waves; resonance; acoustic analogs; and forces, power, and energy.

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | electromagnetic fields | electromagnetic fields | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | devices and circuits | devices and circuits | static and quasistatic fields | static and quasistatic fields | electromagnetic forces | electromagnetic forces | actuators | actuators | sensors | sensors | TEM lines | TEM lines | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves | antennas | antennas | radiation | radiation | optical communications | optical communications | acoustics | acoustics

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3.A08 Attraction and Repulsion: The Magic of Magnets (MIT) 3.A08 Attraction and Repulsion: The Magic of Magnets (MIT)

Description

This Freshman Advising Seminar surveys the many applications of magnets and magnetism. To the Chinese and Greeks of ancient times, the attractive and repulsive forces between magnets must have seemed magical indeed. Through the ages, miraculous curative powers have been attributed to magnets, and magnets have been used by illusionists to produce "magical" effects. Magnets guided ships in the Age of Exploration and generated the electrical industry in the 19th century. Today they store information and entertainment on disks and tapes, and produce sound in speakers, images on TV screens, rotation in motors, and levitation in high-speed trains. Students visit various MIT projects related to magnets (including superconducting electromagnets) and read about and discuss the history, legends, p This Freshman Advising Seminar surveys the many applications of magnets and magnetism. To the Chinese and Greeks of ancient times, the attractive and repulsive forces between magnets must have seemed magical indeed. Through the ages, miraculous curative powers have been attributed to magnets, and magnets have been used by illusionists to produce "magical" effects. Magnets guided ships in the Age of Exploration and generated the electrical industry in the 19th century. Today they store information and entertainment on disks and tapes, and produce sound in speakers, images on TV screens, rotation in motors, and levitation in high-speed trains. Students visit various MIT projects related to magnets (including superconducting electromagnets) and read about and discuss the history, legends, p

Subjects

magnetism | magnetism | electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | freshman seminar | freshman seminar | magnetic field | magnetic field | Mr. Magnet | Mr. Magnet | levitation | levitation | hard disk | hard disk | magnetoptic | magnetoptic | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | imaging | imaging | SQUID | SQUID | biomagnetism | biomagnetism | NMR | NMR

License

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6.061 Introduction to Electric Power Systems (MIT) 6.061 Introduction to Electric Power Systems (MIT)

Description

This course is an introductory subject in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Electric power has become increasingly important as a way of transmitting and transforming energy in industrial, military and transportation uses. Electric power systems are also at the heart of alternative energy systems, including wind and solar electric, geothermal and small scale hydroelectric generation. This course is an introductory subject in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Electric power has become increasingly important as a way of transmitting and transforming energy in industrial, military and transportation uses. Electric power systems are also at the heart of alternative energy systems, including wind and solar electric, geothermal and small scale hydroelectric generation.

Subjects

electric power systems | electric power systems | energy conversion | energy conversion | electrical energy | electrical energy | mechanical energy | mechanical energy | electric transportation | electric transportation | alternative energy | alternative energy | electric circuits | electric circuits | magnetic field devices | magnetic field devices | lumped parameter electromechanics | lumped parameter electromechanics

License

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6.763 Applied Superconductivity (MIT) 6.763 Applied Superconductivity (MIT)

Description

This course provides a phenomenological approach to superconductivity, with emphasis on superconducting electronics. Topics include: electrodynamics of superconductors, London's model, flux quantization, Josephson Junctions, superconducting quantum devices, equivalent circuits, high-speed superconducting electronics, and quantized circuits for quantum computing. The course also provides an overview of type II superconductors, critical magnetic fields, pinning, the critical state model, superconducting materials, and microscopic theory of superconductivity. This course provides a phenomenological approach to superconductivity, with emphasis on superconducting electronics. Topics include: electrodynamics of superconductors, London's model, flux quantization, Josephson Junctions, superconducting quantum devices, equivalent circuits, high-speed superconducting electronics, and quantized circuits for quantum computing. The course also provides an overview of type II superconductors, critical magnetic fields, pinning, the critical state model, superconducting materials, and microscopic theory of superconductivity.

Subjects

applied superconductivity | applied superconductivity | superconducting electronics | superconducting electronics | electrodynamics of superconductors | electrodynamics of superconductors | London's model | London's model | flux quantization | flux quantization | Josephson Junctions | Josephson Junctions | superconducting quantum devices | superconducting quantum devices | equivalent circuits | equivalent circuits | high-speed superconducting electronics | high-speed superconducting electronics | quantized circuits | quantized circuits | quantum computing | quantum computing | type II superconductors | type II superconductors | critical magnetic fields | critical magnetic fields | pinning | pinning | the critical state model | the critical state model | superconducting materials | superconducting materials | microscopic theory of superconductivity | microscopic theory of superconductivity

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6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT) 6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgement The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen for transcribing into LaTeX selected homework problems, homework solutions, and exams. 6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgement The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen for transcribing into LaTeX selected homework problems, homework solutions, and exams.

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | electromagnetic field | forces | forces | motion | motion | electric | electric | magnetic | magnetic | quasistatic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | dielectric | conduction | conduction | magnetization | magnetization | boundary value problems | boundary value problems | force densities | force densities | stress tensors | stress tensors | polarization | polarization | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | equations of motion | equations of motion | energy conservation | energy conservation | synchronous | synchronous | induction | induction | commutator machines | commutator machines | sensors | sensors | transducers | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena | charge transport phenomena

License

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8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism (MIT) 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism (MIT)

Description

This freshman-level course is the second semester of introductory physics. The focus is on electricity and magnetism. The subject is taught using the TEAL (Technology Enabled Active Learning) format which utilizes small group interaction and current technology. The TEAL/Studio Project at MIT is a new approach to physics education designed to help students develop much better intuition about, and conceptual models of, physical phenomena. Staff List Visualizations: Prof. John Belcher Instructors: Dr. Peter Dourmashkin Prof. Bruce Knuteson Prof. Gunther Roland Prof. Bolek Wyslouch Dr. Brian Wecht Prof. Eric Katsavounidis Prof. Robert Simcoe Prof. Joseph Formaggio Course Co-Administrators: Dr. Peter Dourmashkin Prof. Robert Redwine Technical Instructors: Andy Neely Matthew Strafuss Course This freshman-level course is the second semester of introductory physics. The focus is on electricity and magnetism. The subject is taught using the TEAL (Technology Enabled Active Learning) format which utilizes small group interaction and current technology. The TEAL/Studio Project at MIT is a new approach to physics education designed to help students develop much better intuition about, and conceptual models of, physical phenomena. Staff List Visualizations: Prof. John Belcher Instructors: Dr. Peter Dourmashkin Prof. Bruce Knuteson Prof. Gunther Roland Prof. Bolek Wyslouch Dr. Brian Wecht Prof. Eric Katsavounidis Prof. Robert Simcoe Prof. Joseph Formaggio Course Co-Administrators: Dr. Peter Dourmashkin Prof. Robert Redwine Technical Instructors: Andy Neely Matthew Strafuss Course

Subjects

electromagnetism | electromagnetism | electrostatics | electrostatics | electric charge | electric charge | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | electric structure of matter | electric structure of matter | conductors | conductors | dielectrics | dielectrics | electrostatic field | electrostatic field | potential | potential | electrostatic energy | electrostatic energy | Electric currents | Electric currents | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | Ampere's law | Ampere's law | Magnetic materials | Magnetic materials | Time-varying fields | Time-varying fields | Faraday's law of induction | Faraday's law of induction | electric circuits | electric circuits | Electromagnetic waves | Electromagnetic waves | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations

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8.033 Relativity (MIT) 8.033 Relativity (MIT)

Description

This course, which concentrates on special relativity, is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include Einstein's postulates, the Lorentz transformation, relativistic effects and paradoxes, and applications involving electromagnetism and particle physics. This course also provides a brief introduction to some concepts of general relativity, including the principle of equivalence, the Schwartzschild metric and black holes, and the FRW metric and cosmology. This course, which concentrates on special relativity, is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include Einstein's postulates, the Lorentz transformation, relativistic effects and paradoxes, and applications involving electromagnetism and particle physics. This course also provides a brief introduction to some concepts of general relativity, including the principle of equivalence, the Schwartzschild metric and black holes, and the FRW metric and cosmology.

Subjects

relativity | relativity | special relativity | special relativity | Einstein's postulates | Einstein's postulates | simultaneity | simultaneity | time dilation | time dilation | length contraction | length contraction | clock synchronization | clock synchronization | Lorentz transformation | Lorentz transformation | relativistic effects | relativistic effects | Minkowski diagrams | Minkowski diagrams | relativistic invariants | relativistic invariants | four-vectors | four-vectors | relativitistic particle collisions | relativitistic particle collisions | relativity and electricity | relativity and electricity | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | general relativity | general relativity | Schwarzchild metric | Schwarzchild metric | gravitational | gravitational | red shift | red shift | light trajectories | light trajectories | geodesics | geodesics | Shapiro delay | Shapiro delay

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Magnetism with an Experimental Focus (MIT) Magnetism with an Experimental Focus (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to electromagnetism and electrostatics. Topics include: electric charge, Coulomb's law, electric structure of matter, conductors and dielectrics, concepts of electrostatic field and potential, electrostatic energy, electric currents, magnetic fields, Ampere's law, magnetic materials, time-varying fields, Faraday's law of induction, basic electric circuits, electromagnetic waves, and Maxwell's equations. The course has an experimental focus, and includes several experiments that are intended to illustrate the concepts being studied. Acknowledgements Prof. Roland wishes to acknowledge that the structure and content of this course owe much to the contributions of Prof. Ambrogio Fasoli. This course is an introduction to electromagnetism and electrostatics. Topics include: electric charge, Coulomb's law, electric structure of matter, conductors and dielectrics, concepts of electrostatic field and potential, electrostatic energy, electric currents, magnetic fields, Ampere's law, magnetic materials, time-varying fields, Faraday's law of induction, basic electric circuits, electromagnetic waves, and Maxwell's equations. The course has an experimental focus, and includes several experiments that are intended to illustrate the concepts being studied. Acknowledgements Prof. Roland wishes to acknowledge that the structure and content of this course owe much to the contributions of Prof. Ambrogio Fasoli.

Subjects

Electromagnetism | Electromagnetism | electrostatics | electrostatics | electric charge | electric charge | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | electric structure of matter | electric structure of matter | conductors | conductors | dielectrics | dielectrics | electrostatic field | electrostatic field | electrostatic potential | electrostatic potential | electrostatic energy | electrostatic energy | electric current | electric current | magnetic field | magnetic field | Ampere's law | Ampere's law | magnetic | magnetic | electric | electric | time-varying fields | time-varying fields | Faraday's law | Faraday's law | induction | induction | circuits | circuits | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | 8.02 | 8.02

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8.06 Quantum Physics III (MIT) 8.06 Quantum Physics III (MIT)

Description

Together, this course and its predecessor, 8.05: Quantum Physics II, cover quantum physics with applications drawn from modern physics. Topics in this course include units, time-independent approximation methods, the structure of one- and two-electron atoms, charged particles in a magnetic field, scattering, and time-dependent perturbation theory. In this second term, students are required to research and write a paper on a topic related to the content of 8.05 and 8.06. Together, this course and its predecessor, 8.05: Quantum Physics II, cover quantum physics with applications drawn from modern physics. Topics in this course include units, time-independent approximation methods, the structure of one- and two-electron atoms, charged particles in a magnetic field, scattering, and time-dependent perturbation theory. In this second term, students are required to research and write a paper on a topic related to the content of 8.05 and 8.06.

Subjects

natural units | natural units | scales of microscopic phenomena | scales of microscopic phenomena | Time-independent approximation methods: degenerate and non-degenerate perturbation theory | Time-independent approximation methods: degenerate and non-degenerate perturbation theory | variational method | variational method | Born-Oppenheimer approximation | Born-Oppenheimer approximation | spin-orbit and relativistic corrections | spin-orbit and relativistic corrections | Zeeman and Stark effects | Zeeman and Stark effects | Charged particles in a magnetic field | Charged particles in a magnetic field | Landau levels | Landau levels | integer quantum hall effect | integer quantum hall effect | Scattering | Scattering | partial waves | partial waves | Born approximation | Born approximation | Time-dependent perturbation theory | Time-dependent perturbation theory

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8.02T Electricity and Magnetism (MIT) 8.02T Electricity and Magnetism (MIT)

Description

This freshman-level course is the second semester of introductory physics. The focus is on electricity and magnetism. The subject is taught using the TEAL (Technology Enabled Active Learning) format which utilizes small group interaction and current technology. The TEAL/Studio Project at MIT is a new approach to physics education designed to help students develop much better intuition about, and conceptual models of, physical phenomena. Acknowledgements The TEAL project is supported by The Alex and Brit d'Arbeloff Fund for Excellence in MIT Education, MIT iCampus, the Davis Educational Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Class of 1960 Endowment for Innovation in Education, the Class of 1951 Fund for Excellence in Education, the Class of 1955 Fund for Excellence in Teaching, a This freshman-level course is the second semester of introductory physics. The focus is on electricity and magnetism. The subject is taught using the TEAL (Technology Enabled Active Learning) format which utilizes small group interaction and current technology. The TEAL/Studio Project at MIT is a new approach to physics education designed to help students develop much better intuition about, and conceptual models of, physical phenomena. Acknowledgements The TEAL project is supported by The Alex and Brit d'Arbeloff Fund for Excellence in MIT Education, MIT iCampus, the Davis Educational Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Class of 1960 Endowment for Innovation in Education, the Class of 1951 Fund for Excellence in Education, the Class of 1955 Fund for Excellence in Teaching, a

Subjects

electromagnetism | electromagnetism | electrostatics | electrostatics | electric charge | electric charge | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | electric structure of matter | electric structure of matter | conductors | conductors | dielectrics | dielectrics | electrostatic field | electrostatic field | potential | potential | electrostatic energy | electrostatic energy | Electric currents | Electric currents | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | Ampere's law | Ampere's law | Magnetic materials | Magnetic materials | Time-varying fields | Time-varying fields | Faraday's law of induction | Faraday's law of induction | electric circuits | electric circuits | Electromagnetic waves | Electromagnetic waves | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations

License

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