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3.A08 Attraction and Repulsion: The Magic of Magnets (MIT) 3.A08 Attraction and Repulsion: The Magic of Magnets (MIT)

Description

This Freshman Advising Seminar surveys the many applications of magnets and magnetism. To the Chinese and Greeks of ancient times, the attractive and repulsive forces between magnets must have seemed magical indeed. Through the ages, miraculous curative powers have been attributed to magnets, and magnets have been used by illusionists to produce "magical" effects. Magnets guided ships in the Age of Exploration and generated the electrical industry in the 19th century. Today they store information and entertainment on disks and tapes, and produce sound in speakers, images on TV screens, rotation in motors, and levitation in high-speed trains. Students visit various MIT projects related to magnets (including superconducting electromagnets) and read about and discuss the history, legends, p This Freshman Advising Seminar surveys the many applications of magnets and magnetism. To the Chinese and Greeks of ancient times, the attractive and repulsive forces between magnets must have seemed magical indeed. Through the ages, miraculous curative powers have been attributed to magnets, and magnets have been used by illusionists to produce "magical" effects. Magnets guided ships in the Age of Exploration and generated the electrical industry in the 19th century. Today they store information and entertainment on disks and tapes, and produce sound in speakers, images on TV screens, rotation in motors, and levitation in high-speed trains. Students visit various MIT projects related to magnets (including superconducting electromagnets) and read about and discuss the history, legends, p

Subjects

magnetism | magnetism | electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | freshman seminar | freshman seminar | magnetic field | magnetic field | Mr. Magnet | Mr. Magnet | levitation | levitation | hard disk | hard disk | magnetoptic | magnetoptic | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | imaging | imaging | SQUID | SQUID | biomagnetism | biomagnetism | NMR | NMR

License

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8.512 Theory of Solids II (MIT) 8.512 Theory of Solids II (MIT)

Description

This is the second term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include linear response theory; the physics of disorder; superconductivity; the local moment and itinerant magnetism; the Kondo problem and Fermi liquid theory. This is the second term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include linear response theory; the physics of disorder; superconductivity; the local moment and itinerant magnetism; the Kondo problem and Fermi liquid theory.

Subjects

Linear response theory | Linear response theory | Fluctuation dissipation theorem | Fluctuation dissipation theorem | Scattering experiment | Scattering experiment | f-sum rule | f-sum rule | Physics of disorder | Physics of disorder | Kubo formula for conductivity | Kubo formula for conductivity | Conductance and sensitivity to boundary conditions | Conductance and sensitivity to boundary conditions | Scaling theory of localization | Scaling theory of localization | Mott variable range hopping | Mott variable range hopping | Superconductor | Superconductor | Transverse response | Transverse response | Landau diamagnetism | Landau diamagnetism | Microscopic derivation of London equation | Microscopic derivation of London equation | Effect of disorder | Effect of disorder | Quasiparticles and coherence factors | Quasiparticles and coherence factors | Tunneling and Josephson effect | Tunneling and Josephson effect | Magnetism | Magnetism | Local moment magnetism | Local moment magnetism | exchange interaction | exchange interaction | Ferro- and anti-ferro magnet and spin wave theory | Ferro- and anti-ferro magnet and spin wave theory | Band magnetism | Band magnetism | Stoner theory | Stoner theory | spin density wave | spin density wave | Local moment in metals | Local moment in metals | Friedel sum rule | Friedel sum rule | Friedel-Anderson model | Friedel-Anderson model | Kondo problem | Kondo problem | Fermi liquid theory | Fermi liquid theory | Electron Green?s function | Electron Green?s function

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8.512 Theory of Solids II (MIT) 8.512 Theory of Solids II (MIT)

Description

This is the second term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include linear response theory; the physics of disorder; superconductivity; the local moment and itinerant magnetism; the Kondo problem and Fermi liquid theory. This is the second term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include linear response theory; the physics of disorder; superconductivity; the local moment and itinerant magnetism; the Kondo problem and Fermi liquid theory.

Subjects

Linear response theory | Linear response theory | Fluctuation dissipation theorem | Fluctuation dissipation theorem | Scattering experiment | Scattering experiment | f-sum rule | f-sum rule | Physics of disorder | Physics of disorder | Kubo formula for conductivity | Kubo formula for conductivity | Conductance and sensitivity to boundary conditions | Conductance and sensitivity to boundary conditions | Scaling theory of localization | Scaling theory of localization | Mott variable range hopping | Mott variable range hopping | Superconductor | Superconductor | Transverse response | Transverse response | Landau diamagnetism | Landau diamagnetism | Microscopic derivation of London equation | Microscopic derivation of London equation | Effect of disorder | Effect of disorder | Quasiparticles and coherence factors | Quasiparticles and coherence factors | Tunneling and Josephson effect | Tunneling and Josephson effect | Magnetism | Magnetism | Local moment magnetism | Local moment magnetism | exchange interaction | exchange interaction | Ferro- and anti-ferro magnet and spin wave theory | Ferro- and anti-ferro magnet and spin wave theory | Band magnetism | Band magnetism | Stoner theory | Stoner theory | spin density wave | spin density wave | Local moment in metals | Local moment in metals | Friedel sum rule | Friedel sum rule | Friedel-Anderson model | Friedel-Anderson model | Kondo problem | Kondo problem | Fermi liquid theory | Fermi liquid theory | Electron Green?s function | Electron Green?s function

License

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Enhancing Physics Knowledge for Teaching – Magnetic materials

Description

In this session we are going to study some of the properties of magnetic materials.

Subjects

magnetism | paramagnetism | ferromagnetism | electromagnetism | diamagnetism | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT) 3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electron | electronic properties | electronic properties | magnetism | magnetism | magentic properties | magentic properties | structure | structure | crystal | crystal | lattice | lattice | energy | energy | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | phonon | quantum | quantum | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | radiation | radiation | battery | battery | fuel cell | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | polymer | polymer | glass | glass | corrosion | corrosion

License

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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT) 3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electron | electronic properties | electronic properties | magnetism | magnetism | magentic properties | magentic properties | structure | structure | crystal | crystal | lattice | lattice | energy | energy | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | phonon | quantum | quantum | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | radiation | radiation | battery | battery | fuel cell | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | polymer | polymer | glass | glass | corrosion | corrosion

License

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3.45 Magnetic Materials (MIT) 3.45 Magnetic Materials (MIT)

Description

This course will cover the following topics: Magnetostatics Origin of magnetism in materials Magnetic domains and domain walls Magnetic anisotropy Reversible and irreversible magnetization processes Hard and soft magnetic materials Magnetic recording Special topics include magnetism of thin films, surfaces and fine particles; transport in ferromagnets, magnetoresistive sensors, and amorphous magnetic materials. This course will cover the following topics: Magnetostatics Origin of magnetism in materials Magnetic domains and domain walls Magnetic anisotropy Reversible and irreversible magnetization processes Hard and soft magnetic materials Magnetic recording Special topics include magnetism of thin films, surfaces and fine particles; transport in ferromagnets, magnetoresistive sensors, and amorphous magnetic materials.

Subjects

Magnetostatics; magnetism; magnetic domains and domain walls; magnetic anisotropy; reversible and irreversible magnetization; hard and soft magnetic materials; magnetic recording; thin films; ferromagnets | Magnetostatics; magnetism; magnetic domains and domain walls; magnetic anisotropy; reversible and irreversible magnetization; hard and soft magnetic materials; magnetic recording; thin films; ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors; amorphous magnetic materials | magnetoresistive sensors; amorphous magnetic materials | Magnetostatics | Magnetostatics | magnetism | magnetism | magnetic domains and domain walls | magnetic domains and domain walls | magnetic anisotropy | magnetic anisotropy | reversible and irreversible magnetization | reversible and irreversible magnetization | hard and soft magnetic materials | hard and soft magnetic materials | magnetic recording | magnetic recording | thin films | thin films | ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors | ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors | amorphous magnetic materials | amorphous magnetic materials

License

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12.002 Physics and Chemistry of the Terrestrial Planets (MIT) 12.002 Physics and Chemistry of the Terrestrial Planets (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the structure, composition, and physical processes governing the terrestrial planets, including their formation and basic orbital properties. Topics include plate tectonics, earthquakes, seismic waves, rheology, impact cratering, gravity and magnetic fields, heat flux, thermal structure, mantle convection, deep interiors, planetary magnetism, and core dynamics. Suitable for majors and non-majors seeking general background in geophysics and planetary structure. This course introduces the structure, composition, and physical processes governing the terrestrial planets, including their formation and basic orbital properties. Topics include plate tectonics, earthquakes, seismic waves, rheology, impact cratering, gravity and magnetic fields, heat flux, thermal structure, mantle convection, deep interiors, planetary magnetism, and core dynamics. Suitable for majors and non-majors seeking general background in geophysics and planetary structure.

Subjects

Terrestrial Planets | Terrestrial Planets | Disk Accretion | Disk Accretion | Planetary Formation | Planetary Formation | Geochronology | Geochronology | Solar System | Solar System | Elastic stress and strain | Elastic stress and strain | Seismic Waves and wave equation | Seismic Waves and wave equation | Seismology | Seismology | Heat | Heat | Diffusion | Diffusion | Geomagnetism | Geomagnetism | Paleomagnetism | Paleomagnetism | Plate Tectonics | Plate Tectonics | Topography | Topography | Isostasy | Isostasy | Gravity Anomalies | Gravity Anomalies

License

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3.A08 Attraction and Repulsion: The Magic of Magnets (MIT)

Description

This Freshman Advising Seminar surveys the many applications of magnets and magnetism. To the Chinese and Greeks of ancient times, the attractive and repulsive forces between magnets must have seemed magical indeed. Through the ages, miraculous curative powers have been attributed to magnets, and magnets have been used by illusionists to produce "magical" effects. Magnets guided ships in the Age of Exploration and generated the electrical industry in the 19th century. Today they store information and entertainment on disks and tapes, and produce sound in speakers, images on TV screens, rotation in motors, and levitation in high-speed trains. Students visit various MIT projects related to magnets (including superconducting electromagnets) and read about and discuss the history, legends, p

Subjects

magnetism | electromagnetic | electromagnetism | freshman seminar | magnetic field | Mr. Magnet | levitation | hard disk | magnetoptic | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetism | imaging | SQUID | biomagnetism | NMR

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.512 Theory of Solids II (MIT)

Description

This is the second term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include linear response theory; the physics of disorder; superconductivity; the local moment and itinerant magnetism; the Kondo problem and Fermi liquid theory.

Subjects

Linear response theory | Fluctuation dissipation theorem | Scattering experiment | f-sum rule | Physics of disorder | Kubo formula for conductivity | Conductance and sensitivity to boundary conditions | Scaling theory of localization | Mott variable range hopping | Superconductor | Transverse response | Landau diamagnetism | Microscopic derivation of London equation | Effect of disorder | Quasiparticles and coherence factors | Tunneling and Josephson effect | Magnetism | Local moment magnetism | exchange interaction | Ferro- and anti-ferro magnet and spin wave theory | Band magnetism | Stoner theory | spin density wave | Local moment in metals | Friedel sum rule | Friedel-Anderson model | Kondo problem | Fermi liquid theory | Electron Green?s function

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.512 Theory of Solids II (MIT)

Description

This is the second term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include linear response theory; the physics of disorder; superconductivity; the local moment and itinerant magnetism; the Kondo problem and Fermi liquid theory.

Subjects

Linear response theory | Fluctuation dissipation theorem | Scattering experiment | f-sum rule | Physics of disorder | Kubo formula for conductivity | Conductance and sensitivity to boundary conditions | Scaling theory of localization | Mott variable range hopping | Superconductor | Transverse response | Landau diamagnetism | Microscopic derivation of London equation | Effect of disorder | Quasiparticles and coherence factors | Tunneling and Josephson effect | Magnetism | Local moment magnetism | exchange interaction | Ferro- and anti-ferro magnet and spin wave theory | Band magnetism | Stoner theory | spin density wave | Local moment in metals | Friedel sum rule | Friedel-Anderson model | Kondo problem | Fermi liquid theory | Electron Green?s function

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ásicos de Física ásicos de Física

Description

Curso puente de Física General entre Ciclos Formativos Preuniversitarios y el primer curso de los Grados de Ingeniería. Curso puente de Física General entre Ciclos Formativos Preuniversitarios y el primer curso de los Grados de Ingeniería.

Subjects

Fisica Aplicada | Fisica Aplicada | electricidad | electricidad | incertidumbres | incertidumbres | Fisica Teorica | Fisica Teorica | magnetismo | magnetismo | Cursos Cero | Cursos Cero | curso cero | curso cero | 2011 | 2011 | ísica General | ísica General | ánica | ánica

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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8.251 String Theory for Undergraduates (MIT) 8.251 String Theory for Undergraduates (MIT)

Description

This course introduces string theory to undergraduate and is based upon Prof. Zwiebach's textbook entitled A First Course in String Theory. Since string theory is quantum mechanics of a relativistic string, the foundations of the subject can be explained to students exposed to both special relativity and basic quantum mechanics. This course develops the aspects of string theory and makes it accessible to students familiar with basic electromagnetism and statistical mechanics.Technical RequirementsSoftware to view the .tex files on this course site can be accessed via the Comprehensive TeX Archive Network (CTAN) and the TeX Users Group Web site. Postscript viewer software, such as Ghostscript/Ghostview, can be used to view the .ps files found on this course site. This course introduces string theory to undergraduate and is based upon Prof. Zwiebach's textbook entitled A First Course in String Theory. Since string theory is quantum mechanics of a relativistic string, the foundations of the subject can be explained to students exposed to both special relativity and basic quantum mechanics. This course develops the aspects of string theory and makes it accessible to students familiar with basic electromagnetism and statistical mechanics.Technical RequirementsSoftware to view the .tex files on this course site can be accessed via the Comprehensive TeX Archive Network (CTAN) and the TeX Users Group Web site. Postscript viewer software, such as Ghostscript/Ghostview, can be used to view the .ps files found on this course site.

Subjects

string theory | string theory | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | relativistic string | relativistic string | special relativity | special relativity | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | D-branes | D-branes | string thermodynamics | string thermodynamics | Light-cone | Light-cone | Tachyons | Tachyons | Kalb-Ramond fields | Kalb-Ramond fields | Lorentz invariance | Lorentz invariance | Born-Infeld electrodynamics | Born-Infeld electrodynamics | Hagedorn temperature | Hagedorn temperature | Riemann surfaces | Riemann surfaces | fermionic string theories | fermionic string theories

License

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8.231 Physics of Solids I (MIT) 8.231 Physics of Solids I (MIT)

Description

The topics covered in this course include:Periodic Structure and Symmetry of CrystalsDiffraction, Reciprocal LatticeChemical BondingLattice DynamicsPhononsThermal PropertiesFree Electron GasModel of MetalsBloch Theorem and Band StructureNearly Free Electron ApproximationTight Binding MethodFermi SurfaceSemiconductorsElectronsHolesImpuritiesOptical PropertiesExcitons andMagnetism The topics covered in this course include:Periodic Structure and Symmetry of CrystalsDiffraction, Reciprocal LatticeChemical BondingLattice DynamicsPhononsThermal PropertiesFree Electron GasModel of MetalsBloch Theorem and Band StructureNearly Free Electron ApproximationTight Binding MethodFermi SurfaceSemiconductorsElectronsHolesImpuritiesOptical PropertiesExcitons andMagnetism

Subjects

periodic structure and symmetry of crystals | periodic structure and symmetry of crystals | diffraction | diffraction | reciprocal lattice | reciprocal lattice | chemical bonding | chemical bonding | phonons | phonons | thermal properties | thermal properties | free electron gas | free electron gas | model of metals | model of metals | Bloch theorem and band structure | Bloch theorem and band structure | nearly free electron approximation | nearly free electron approximation | tight binding method | tight binding method | Fermi surface | Fermi surface | semiconductors | semiconductors | electrons | electrons | holes | holes | impurities | impurities | optical properties | optical properties | excitons | excitons | magnetism | magnetism

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Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT) Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance. This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | electrical conductivity | doping | doping | transistors | transistors | photodectors | photodectors | photovoltaics | photovoltaics | luminescence | luminescence | light emitting diodes | light emitting diodes | lasers | lasers | optical phenomena | optical phenomena | photonics | photonics | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance | magnetoresistance | electrical devices | electrical devices | optical devices | optical devices | magnetic devices | magnetic devices | materials | materials | device applications | device applications

License

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8.033 Relativity (MIT) 8.033 Relativity (MIT)

Description

Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay. Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay.

Subjects

Einstein's postulates | Einstein's postulates | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | Lorentz transformation | Lorentz transformation | relativistic effects and paradoxes | relativistic effects and paradoxes | Minkowski diagrams | Minkowski diagrams | invariants and four-vectors | invariants and four-vectors | momentum | energy and mass | momentum | energy and mass | particle collisions | particle collisions | Relativity and electricity | Relativity and electricity | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | General Relativity | General Relativity | principle of equivalence | principle of equivalence | the Schwarzchild metric | the Schwarzchild metric | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | gravitational red shift | particle trajectories | particle trajectories | light trajectories | light trajectories | invariants | invariants | four-vectors | four-vectors | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | mass | mass | relativistic effects | relativistic effects | paradoxes | paradoxes | electricity | electricity | time dilation | time dilation | length contraction | length contraction | clock synchronization | clock synchronization | Schwarzchild metric | Schwarzchild metric | geodesics | geodesics | Shaprio delay | Shaprio delay | relativistic kinematics | relativistic kinematics | relativistic dynamics | relativistic dynamics | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | hubble expansion | hubble expansion | universe | universe | equivalence principle | equivalence principle | curved space time | curved space time | Ether Theory | Ether Theory | constants | constants | speed of light | speed of light | c | c | graph | graph | pythagorem theorem | pythagorem theorem | triangle | triangle | arrows | arrows

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22.105 Electromagnetic Interactions (MIT) 22.105 Electromagnetic Interactions (MIT)

Description

Principles and applications of electromagnetism, starting from Maxwell's equations, with emphasis on phenomena important to nuclear engineering and radiation sciences. Solution methods for electrostatic and magnetostatic fields. Charged particle motion in those fields. Particle acceleration and focussing. Collisions with charged particles and with atoms. Electromagnetic waves, wave emission by accelerated particles, Bremsstrahlung. Compton scattering. Photoionization. Elementary applications to ranging, shielding, imaging, and radiation effects. Principles and applications of electromagnetism, starting from Maxwell's equations, with emphasis on phenomena important to nuclear engineering and radiation sciences. Solution methods for electrostatic and magnetostatic fields. Charged particle motion in those fields. Particle acceleration and focussing. Collisions with charged particles and with atoms. Electromagnetic waves, wave emission by accelerated particles, Bremsstrahlung. Compton scattering. Photoionization. Elementary applications to ranging, shielding, imaging, and radiation effects.

Subjects

electromagnetism | | electromagnetism | | Maxwell's equations | | Maxwell's equations | | electrostatic fields | | electrostatic fields | | magnetostatic fields | | magnetostatic fields | | Charged particle motion | | Charged particle motion | | Particle acceleration | | Particle acceleration | | Electromagnetic waves | | Electromagnetic waves | | Bremsstrahlung | | Bremsstrahlung | | Compton scattering | | Compton scattering | | Photoionization | Photoionization

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8.251 String Theory for Undergraduates (MIT) 8.251 String Theory for Undergraduates (MIT)

Description

Introduction to the main concepts of string theory to undergraduates. Since string theory is quantum mechanics of a relativistic string, the foundations of the subject can be explained to students exposed to both special relativity (8.033) and basic quantum mechanics (8.05). Subject develops the aspects of string theory and makes it accessible to students familiar with basic electromagnetism (8.02) and statistical mechanics (8.044). This includes the study of D-branes and string thermodynamics. Introduction to the main concepts of string theory to undergraduates. Since string theory is quantum mechanics of a relativistic string, the foundations of the subject can be explained to students exposed to both special relativity (8.033) and basic quantum mechanics (8.05). Subject develops the aspects of string theory and makes it accessible to students familiar with basic electromagnetism (8.02) and statistical mechanics (8.044). This includes the study of D-branes and string thermodynamics.

Subjects

string theory | string theory | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | relativistic string | relativistic string | special relativity | special relativity | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | D-branes | D-branes | string thermodynamics | string thermodynamics | Light-cone | Light-cone | Tachyons | Tachyons | Kalb-Ramond fields | Kalb-Ramond fields | Lorentz invariance | Lorentz invariance | Born-Infeld electrodynamics | Born-Infeld electrodynamics | Hagedorn temperature | Hagedorn temperature | Riemann surfaces | Riemann surfaces | fermionic string theories | fermionic string theories | nuclear reactions | nuclear reactions

License

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3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science (MIT) 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science (MIT)

Description

This subject describes the fundamentals of bonding, energetics, and structure that underpin materials science. From electrons to silicon to DNA: the role of electronic bonding in determining the energy, structure, and stability of materials. Quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms. Symmetry properties of molecules and solids. Structure of complex and disordered materials. Introduction to thermodynamic functions and laws governing equilibrium properties, relating macroscopic behavior to molecular models of materials. Develops basis for understanding a broad range of materials phenomena, from heat capacities, phase transformations, and multiphase equilibria to chemical reactions and magnetism. Fundamentals are taught using real-world examples such as engineered all This subject describes the fundamentals of bonding, energetics, and structure that underpin materials science. From electrons to silicon to DNA: the role of electronic bonding in determining the energy, structure, and stability of materials. Quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms. Symmetry properties of molecules and solids. Structure of complex and disordered materials. Introduction to thermodynamic functions and laws governing equilibrium properties, relating macroscopic behavior to molecular models of materials. Develops basis for understanding a broad range of materials phenomena, from heat capacities, phase transformations, and multiphase equilibria to chemical reactions and magnetism. Fundamentals are taught using real-world examples such as engineered all

Subjects

fundamentals of bonding | energetics | and structure | fundamentals of bonding | energetics | and structure | Quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms | Quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms | Symmetry properties of molecules and solids | Symmetry properties of molecules and solids | complex and disordered materials | complex and disordered materials | thermodynamic functions | thermodynamic functions | equilibrium properties | equilibrium properties | macroscopic behavior | macroscopic behavior | molecular models | molecular models | heat capacities | heat capacities | phase transformations | phase transformations | multiphase equilibria | multiphase equilibria | chemical reactions | chemical reactions | magnetism | magnetism | engineered alloys | engineered alloys | electronic and magnetic materials | electronic and magnetic materials | ionic and network solids | ionic and network solids | polymers | polymers | biomaterials | biomaterials | energetics | energetics | structure | structure | materials science | materials science | electrons | electrons | silicon | silicon | DNA | DNA | electronic bonding | electronic bonding | energy | energy | stability | stability | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | atoms | atoms | interactions | interactions | symmetry | symmetry | molecules | molecules | solids | solids | complex material | complex material | disorderd materials | disorderd materials | thermodynamic laws | thermodynamic laws | electronic materials | electronic materials | magnetic materials | magnetic materials | ionic solids | ionic solids | network solids | network solids | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | microstates | microstates | microscopic complexity | microscopic complexity | entropy | entropy

License

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8.02 Electricity and Magnetism: TEAL:Studio Physics Project (MIT) 8.02 Electricity and Magnetism: TEAL:Studio Physics Project (MIT)

Description

Introduction to electromagnetism and electrostatics: electric charge, Coulomb's law, electric structure of matter; conductors and dielectrics. Concepts of electrostatic field and potential, electrostatic energy. Electric currents, magnetic fields and Ampere's law. Magnetic materials. Time-varying fields and Faraday's law of induction. Basic electric circuits. Electromagnetic waves and Maxwell's equations.Staff Credits for TEAL Visualizations:Project Manager: Andrew McKinneyJava 3D Applets: Andrew McKinney, Philip Bailey, Pierre Poignant, Ying Cao, Ralph Rabat, Mikael Rechtsman3D Illustration/Animation: Mark BessetteShockWave Visualizations: Michael DanzigerVisualization Techniques R&D: Andreas Sundquist (DLIC), Mesrob Ohannessian (IDRAW)Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Introduction to electromagnetism and electrostatics: electric charge, Coulomb's law, electric structure of matter; conductors and dielectrics. Concepts of electrostatic field and potential, electrostatic energy. Electric currents, magnetic fields and Ampere's law. Magnetic materials. Time-varying fields and Faraday's law of induction. Basic electric circuits. Electromagnetic waves and Maxwell's equations.Staff Credits for TEAL Visualizations:Project Manager: Andrew McKinneyJava 3D Applets: Andrew McKinney, Philip Bailey, Pierre Poignant, Ying Cao, Ralph Rabat, Mikael Rechtsman3D Illustration/Animation: Mark BessetteShockWave Visualizations: Michael DanzigerVisualization Techniques R&D: Andreas Sundquist (DLIC), Mesrob Ohannessian (IDRAW)Technical RequirementsRealOne™

Subjects

dielectrics | dielectrics | conductors | conductors | electric structure of matter | electric structure of matter | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | electrostatics | electrostatics | electromagnetism | electromagnetism

License

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3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others. This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others.

Subjects

metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | bonding | bonding | structure | structure | energy band | energy band | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | optical detectors | sensors | sensors | thin films | thin films | biomaterials | biomaterials | cellular materials | cellular materials | magnetism | magnetism | polarity | polarity | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | plasticity | fracture | fracture | materials selection | materials selection

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Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT) Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. The class uses a device-motivated approach which emphasizes emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance. This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. The class uses a device-motivated approach which emphasizes emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | electrical conductivity | doping | doping | transistors | transistors | photodectors | photodectors | photovoltaics | photovoltaics | luminescence | luminescence | light emitting diodes | light emitting diodes | lasers | lasers | optical phenomena | optical phenomena | photonics | photonics | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance | magnetoresistance

License

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3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science (MIT) 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the fundamentals of structure, energetics, and bonding that underpin materials science. It is the introductory lecture class for sophomore students in Materials Science and Engineering, taken with 3.014 and 3.016 to create a unified introduction to the subject. Topics include: an introduction to thermodynamic functions and laws governing equilibrium properties, relating macroscopic behavior to atomistic and molecular models of materials; the role of electronic bonding in determining the energy, structure, and stability of materials; quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms; materials phenomena, such as heat capacities, phase transformations, and multiphase equilibria to chemical reactions and magnetism; symmetry properties of molecules and s This course focuses on the fundamentals of structure, energetics, and bonding that underpin materials science. It is the introductory lecture class for sophomore students in Materials Science and Engineering, taken with 3.014 and 3.016 to create a unified introduction to the subject. Topics include: an introduction to thermodynamic functions and laws governing equilibrium properties, relating macroscopic behavior to atomistic and molecular models of materials; the role of electronic bonding in determining the energy, structure, and stability of materials; quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms; materials phenomena, such as heat capacities, phase transformations, and multiphase equilibria to chemical reactions and magnetism; symmetry properties of molecules and s

Subjects

bonding | bonding | energetics | energetics | structure | structure | antibonding | antibonding | hydrogen | hydrogen | Quantum mechanics | Quantum mechanics | electron | electron | atom | atom | molecule | molecule | molecular dynamics | molecular dynamics | MD | MD | Symmetry properties | Symmetry properties | solid | solid | gas | gas | liquid | liquid | phase | phase | matter; molecular geometry | matter; molecular geometry | complex and disordered materials | complex and disordered materials | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | equilibrium property | equilibrium property | macroscopic behavior | macroscopic behavior | molecular model | molecular model | heat capacity | heat capacity | phase transformation | phase transformation | multiphase equilibria | multiphase equilibria | chemical reaction | chemical reaction | magnetism | magnetism | engineered alloy | engineered alloy | electronic and magnetic material | electronic and magnetic material | ionic solid | ionic solid | network solid | network solid | polymer | polymer | biomaterial | biomaterial | glass | glass | liquid crystal | liquid crystal | LCD | LCD | matter | matter | molecular geometry | molecular geometry

License

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6.635 Advanced Electromagnetism (MIT) 6.635 Advanced Electromagnetism (MIT)

Description

In 6.635, topics covered include: special relativity, electrodynamics of moving media, waves in dispersive media, microstrip integrated circuits, quantum optics, remote sensing, radiative transfer theory, scattering by rough surfaces, effective permittivities, random media, Green's functions for planarly layered media, integral equations in electromagnetics, method of moments, time domain method of moments, EM waves in periodic structures: photonic crystals and negative refraction. In 6.635, topics covered include: special relativity, electrodynamics of moving media, waves in dispersive media, microstrip integrated circuits, quantum optics, remote sensing, radiative transfer theory, scattering by rough surfaces, effective permittivities, random media, Green's functions for planarly layered media, integral equations in electromagnetics, method of moments, time domain method of moments, EM waves in periodic structures: photonic crystals and negative refraction.

Subjects

electromagnetism | electromagnetism | special relativity | special relativity | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | waves | waves | dispersive media | dispersive media | microstrip integrated circuits | microstrip integrated circuits | quantum optics | quantum optics | remote sensing | remote sensing | radiative transfer theory | radiative transfer theory | scattering | scattering | effective permittivities | effective permittivities | random media | random media | Green's functions | Green's functions | planarly layered media | planarly layered media | integral equations | integral equations | method of moments | method of moments | time domain method of moments | time domain method of moments | EM waves | EM waves | periodic structures | periodic structures | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | negative refraction | negative refraction

License

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8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism (MIT) 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism (MIT)

Description

This freshman-level course is the second semester of introductory physics. The focus is on electricity and magnetism. The subject is taught using the TEAL (Technology Enabled Active Learning) format which utilizes small group interaction and current technology. The TEAL/Studio Project at MIT is a new approach to physics education designed to help students develop much better intuition about, and conceptual models of, physical phenomena. Staff List Visualizations: Prof. John Belcher Instructors: Dr. Peter Dourmashkin Prof. Bruce Knuteson Prof. Gunther Roland Prof. Bolek Wyslouch Dr. Brian Wecht Prof. Eric Katsavounidis Prof. Robert Simcoe Prof. Joseph Formaggio Course Co-Administrators: Dr. Peter Dourmashkin Prof. Robert Redwine Technical Instructors: Andy Neely Matthew Strafuss Course This freshman-level course is the second semester of introductory physics. The focus is on electricity and magnetism. The subject is taught using the TEAL (Technology Enabled Active Learning) format which utilizes small group interaction and current technology. The TEAL/Studio Project at MIT is a new approach to physics education designed to help students develop much better intuition about, and conceptual models of, physical phenomena. Staff List Visualizations: Prof. John Belcher Instructors: Dr. Peter Dourmashkin Prof. Bruce Knuteson Prof. Gunther Roland Prof. Bolek Wyslouch Dr. Brian Wecht Prof. Eric Katsavounidis Prof. Robert Simcoe Prof. Joseph Formaggio Course Co-Administrators: Dr. Peter Dourmashkin Prof. Robert Redwine Technical Instructors: Andy Neely Matthew Strafuss Course

Subjects

electromagnetism | electromagnetism | electrostatics | electrostatics | electric charge | electric charge | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | electric structure of matter | electric structure of matter | conductors | conductors | dielectrics | dielectrics | electrostatic field | electrostatic field | potential | potential | electrostatic energy | electrostatic energy | Electric currents | Electric currents | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | Ampere's law | Ampere's law | Magnetic materials | Magnetic materials | Time-varying fields | Time-varying fields | Faraday's law of induction | Faraday's law of induction | electric circuits | electric circuits | Electromagnetic waves | Electromagnetic waves | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations

License

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