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3.45 Magnetic Materials (MIT) 3.45 Magnetic Materials (MIT)

Description

This course will cover the following topics: Magnetostatics Origin of magnetism in materials Magnetic domains and domain walls Magnetic anisotropy Reversible and irreversible magnetization processes Hard and soft magnetic materials Magnetic recording Special topics include magnetism of thin films, surfaces and fine particles; transport in ferromagnets, magnetoresistive sensors, and amorphous magnetic materials. This course will cover the following topics: Magnetostatics Origin of magnetism in materials Magnetic domains and domain walls Magnetic anisotropy Reversible and irreversible magnetization processes Hard and soft magnetic materials Magnetic recording Special topics include magnetism of thin films, surfaces and fine particles; transport in ferromagnets, magnetoresistive sensors, and amorphous magnetic materials.

Subjects

Magnetostatics; magnetism; magnetic domains and domain walls; magnetic anisotropy; reversible and irreversible magnetization; hard and soft magnetic materials; magnetic recording; thin films; ferromagnets | Magnetostatics; magnetism; magnetic domains and domain walls; magnetic anisotropy; reversible and irreversible magnetization; hard and soft magnetic materials; magnetic recording; thin films; ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors; amorphous magnetic materials | magnetoresistive sensors; amorphous magnetic materials | Magnetostatics | Magnetostatics | magnetism | magnetism | magnetic domains and domain walls | magnetic domains and domain walls | magnetic anisotropy | magnetic anisotropy | reversible and irreversible magnetization | reversible and irreversible magnetization | hard and soft magnetic materials | hard and soft magnetic materials | magnetic recording | magnetic recording | thin films | thin films | ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors | ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors | amorphous magnetic materials | amorphous magnetic materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT) 6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgments The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen and Matthew Pegler for transcribing into LaTeX the homework problems, homework solutions, and Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgments The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen and Matthew Pegler for transcribing into LaTeX the homework problems, homework solutions, and

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | electromagnetic field | forces | forces | motion | motion | electric | electric | magnetic | magnetic | quasistatic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | dielectric | conduction | conduction | magnetization | magnetization | boundary value problems | boundary value problems | force densities | force densities | stress tensors | stress tensors | polarization | polarization | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | equations of motion | equations of motion | energy conservation | energy conservation | synchronous | synchronous | induction | induction | commutator machines | commutator machines | sensors | sensors | transducers | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena | charge transport phenomena

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.45 Magnetic Materials (MIT)

Description

This course will cover the following topics: Magnetostatics Origin of magnetism in materials Magnetic domains and domain walls Magnetic anisotropy Reversible and irreversible magnetization processes Hard and soft magnetic materials Magnetic recording Special topics include magnetism of thin films, surfaces and fine particles; transport in ferromagnets, magnetoresistive sensors, and amorphous magnetic materials.

Subjects

Magnetostatics; magnetism; magnetic domains and domain walls; magnetic anisotropy; reversible and irreversible magnetization; hard and soft magnetic materials; magnetic recording; thin films; ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors; amorphous magnetic materials | Magnetostatics | magnetism | magnetic domains and domain walls | magnetic anisotropy | reversible and irreversible magnetization | hard and soft magnetic materials | magnetic recording | thin films | ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors | amorphous magnetic materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.024 Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.024 Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course describes how electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials originate from their electronic and molecular structure and how these properties can be designed for particular applications. It offers experimental exploration of the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials through hands-on experimentation and practical materials examples. This course describes how electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials originate from their electronic and molecular structure and how these properties can be designed for particular applications. It offers experimental exploration of the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials through hands-on experimentation and practical materials examples.

Subjects

electronic properites | electronic properites | optical properties | optical properties | magnetic properties | magnetic properties | materials | materials | Hamilton approach | Hamilton approach | Schrödinger’s Equation | Schrödinger’s Equation | mechanics | mechanics | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | spectral decomposition | spectral decomposition | symmetries | symmetries | angular momentum | angular momentum | periodic potentials | periodic potentials | band diagrams | band diagrams | Fermi | Fermi | Fermi-Dirac | Fermi-Dirac | p-n junction | p-n junction | light emitting diodes | light emitting diodes | wave optics | wave optics | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves | magnetization | magnetization | semiconductor devices | semiconductor devices | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | photonic bands | photonic bands

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT) 9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

We are now at an unprecedented point in the field of neuroscience: We can watch the human brain in action as it sees, thinks, decides, reads, and remembers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the only method that enables us to monitor local neural activity in the normal human brain in a noninvasive fashion and with good spatial resolution. A large number of far-reaching and fundamental questions about the human mind and brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of this technology. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information including object recognition, mental imagery, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, and visual memory. The goals of this course are to help We are now at an unprecedented point in the field of neuroscience: We can watch the human brain in action as it sees, thinks, decides, reads, and remembers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the only method that enables us to monitor local neural activity in the normal human brain in a noninvasive fashion and with good spatial resolution. A large number of far-reaching and fundamental questions about the human mind and brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of this technology. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information including object recognition, mental imagery, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, and visual memory. The goals of this course are to help

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | neural activity | human | human | brain | brain | noninvasive | noninvasive | resolution | resolution | high-level vision | high-level vision | object recognition | object recognition | visual attention | visual attention | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visually guided action | visual memory | visual memory | voxelwise analysis | voxelwise analysis | conjugate mirroring | conjugate mirroring | interleaved stimulus presentation | interleaved stimulus presentation | magnetization following excitation | magnetization following excitation | active voxels | active voxels | scanner drift | scanner drift | trial sorting | trial sorting | collinear factors | collinear factors | different model factors | different model factors | mock scanner | mock scanner | scanner session | scanner session | visual stimulation task | visual stimulation task | hemoglobin signal | hemoglobin signal | labeling plane | labeling plane | nearby voxels | nearby voxels | shimming coils | shimming coils | bias field estimation | bias field estimation | conscious encoding | conscious encoding | spiral imaging | spiral imaging | functional resolution | functional resolution | hemodynamic activity | hemodynamic activity | direct cortical stimulation | direct cortical stimulation | physiological noise | physiological noise | refractory effects | refractory effects | independent statistical tests. | independent statistical tests.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT) 6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. 6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | electromagnetic field | forces | forces | motion | motion | electric | electric | magnetic | magnetic | quasistatic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | dielectric | conduction | conduction | magnetization | magnetization | boundary value problems | boundary value problems | force densities | force densities | stress tensors | stress tensors | polarization | polarization | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | equations of motion | equations of motion | energy conservation | energy conservation | synchronous | synchronous | induction | induction | commutator machines | commutator machines | sensors | sensors | transducers | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena | charge transport phenomena

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT) 6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgement The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen for transcribing into LaTeX selected homework problems, homework solutions, and exams. 6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgement The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen for transcribing into LaTeX selected homework problems, homework solutions, and exams.

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | electromagnetic field | forces | forces | motion | motion | electric | electric | magnetic | magnetic | quasistatic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | dielectric | conduction | conduction | magnetization | magnetization | boundary value problems | boundary value problems | force densities | force densities | stress tensors | stress tensors | polarization | polarization | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | equations of motion | equations of motion | energy conservation | energy conservation | synchronous | synchronous | induction | induction | commutator machines | commutator machines | sensors | sensors | transducers | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena | charge transport phenomena

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

This course examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgments The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen and Matthew Pegler for transcribing into LaTeX the homework problems, homework solutions, and exam solutions.

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | forces | motion | electric | magnetic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | conduction | magnetization | boundary value problems | force densities | stress tensors | polarization | thermodynamics | equations of motion | energy conservation | synchronous | induction | commutator machines | sensors | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

We are now at an unprecedented point in the field of neuroscience: We can watch the human brain in action as it sees, thinks, decides, reads, and remembers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the only method that enables us to monitor local neural activity in the normal human brain in a noninvasive fashion and with good spatial resolution. A large number of far-reaching and fundamental questions about the human mind and brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of this technology. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information including object recognition, mental imagery, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, and visual memory. The goals of this course are to help

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | human | brain | noninvasive | resolution | high-level vision | object recognition | visual attention | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visual memory | voxelwise analysis | conjugate mirroring | interleaved stimulus presentation | magnetization following excitation | active voxels | scanner drift | trial sorting | collinear factors | different model factors | mock scanner | scanner session | visual stimulation task | hemoglobin signal | labeling plane | nearby voxels | shimming coils | bias field estimation | conscious encoding | spiral imaging | functional resolution | hemodynamic activity | direct cortical stimulation | physiological noise | refractory effects | independent statistical tests.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.024 Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course describes how electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials originate from their electronic and molecular structure and how these properties can be designed for particular applications. It offers experimental exploration of the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials through hands-on experimentation and practical materials examples.

Subjects

electronic properites | optical properties | magnetic properties | materials | Hamilton approach | dinger?s Equation | mechanics | quantum mechanics | spectral decomposition | symmetries | angular momentum | periodic potentials | band diagrams | Fermi | Fermi-Dirac | p-n junction | light emitting diodes | wave optics | electromagnetic waves | magnetization | semiconductor devices | Maxwell's equations | photonic bands

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgement The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen for transcribing into LaTeX selected homework problems, homework solutions, and exams.

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | forces | motion | electric | magnetic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | conduction | magnetization | boundary value problems | force densities | stress tensors | polarization | thermodynamics | equations of motion | energy conservation | synchronous | induction | commutator machines | sensors | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgement The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen for transcribing into LaTeX selected homework problems, homework solutions, and exams.

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | forces | motion | electric | magnetic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | conduction | magnetization | boundary value problems | force densities | stress tensors | polarization | thermodynamics | equations of motion | energy conservation | synchronous | induction | commutator machines | sensors | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | forces | motion | electric | magnetic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | conduction | magnetization | boundary value problems | force densities | stress tensors | polarization | thermodynamics | equations of motion | energy conservation | synchronous | induction | commutator machines | sensors | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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