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SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT) SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality. This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

sex | sex | gender | gender | identity | identity | homosexual | homosexual | transgender | transgender | lesbian | lesbian | third sex | third sex | drag | drag | stonewall | stonewall | queer | queer | masculinity | masculinity | femininity | femininity | sexuality | sexuality | medicalization | medicalization | marriage | marriage | feminism | feminism | queer theory | queer theory | trans | trans | genderqueer | genderqueer | essentialism | essentialism | women | women | gender studies | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT) 21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity. In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity.

Subjects

21H.153 | 21H.153 | 21G.069 | 21G.069 | WGS.237 | WGS.237 | racial and gender discourse | racial and gender discourse | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | Asian American masculinity | Asian American masculinity | Asian American feminisms | Asian American feminisms | feminism | feminism | ethnic nationalism | ethnic nationalism | gay and lesbian identity | gay and lesbian identity | class and labor issues | class and labor issues | domestic violence | domestic violence | interracial dating and marriage | interracial dating and marriage | multiracial identity | multiracial identity | SP.603J | SP.603J | SP.603 | SP.603

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT) SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in various media. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and consider how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality. This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in various media. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and consider how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

Sex | Sex | gender | gender | identity | identity | homosexual | homosexual | transgender | transgender | lesbian | lesbian | third sex | third sex | drag | drag | stonewall | stonewall | queer | queer | masculinity | masculinity | femininity | femininity | sexuality | sexuality | medicalization | medicalization | marriage | marriage | feminism | feminism | queer theory | queer theory | trans | trans | genderqueer | genderqueer | essentialism | essentialism | women | women | gender studies | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.301J Feminist Thought (MIT) WGS.301J Feminist Thought (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes theories of gender and politics, especially ideologies of gender and their construction. Also discussed are definitions of public and private spheres, gender issues in citizenship, the development of the welfare state, experiences of war and revolution, class formation, and the politics of sexuality.Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research. This course analyzes theories of gender and politics, especially ideologies of gender and their construction. Also discussed are definitions of public and private spheres, gender issues in citizenship, the development of the welfare state, experiences of war and revolution, class formation, and the politics of sexuality.Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

WGS.301 | WGS.301 | 17.007 | 17.007 | 24.237 | 24.237 | feminism | feminism | feminist | feminist | sex | sex | gender | gender | oppression | oppression | Humanist approach | Humanist approach | Gynocentric approach | Gynocentric approach | Dominance approach | Dominance approach | social construction | social construction | liberal | liberal | subjection | subjection | female | female | politics | politics | pornography | pornography | lesbian | lesbian | Simone de Beauvoir | Simone de Beauvoir | Butler | Butler | domestic violence | domestic violence | prejudice | prejudice | queer theory | queer theory | masculinity | masculinity | epistemic injustice | epistemic injustice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.110 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT) WGS.110 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality. This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

sex | sex | gender | gender | identity | identity | homosexual | homosexual | transgender | transgender | lesbian | lesbian | third sex | third sex | drag | drag | stonewall | stonewall | queer | queer | masculinity | masculinity | femininity | femininity | sexuality | sexuality | medicalization | medicalization | marriage | marriage | feminism | feminism | queer theory | queer theory | trans | trans | genderqueer | genderqueer | essentialism | essentialism | women | women | gender studies | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.039J Gender and Japanese Popular Culture (MIT) 21G.039J Gender and Japanese Popular Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines relationships between identity and participation in Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities, and culture. It emphasizes contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power and value in global culture industries. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music, anime and feature films, video games, contemporary literature, and online communication. Students present analyses and develop a final project based on a particular aspect of gender and popular culture. This course examines relationships between identity and participation in Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities, and culture. It emphasizes contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power and value in global culture industries. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music, anime and feature films, video games, contemporary literature, and online communication. Students present analyses and develop a final project based on a particular aspect of gender and popular culture.

Subjects

gender | gender | Japan | Japan | culture | culture | Pecha Kucha | Pecha Kucha | media theory | media theory | manga | manga | inequality | inequality | economics | economics | robots | robots | technology | technology | anime | anime | anthropology | anthropology | queer | queer | transgender | transgender | hostess club | hostess club | feminist social theory | feminist social theory | gender traits | gender traits | fujoshi | fujoshi | women | women | Princess Jellyfish | Princess Jellyfish | Kuragehime | Kuragehime | convergence culture | convergence culture | participatory culture | participatory culture | capital | capital | debt | debt | power | power | slavery | slavery | sexism | sexism | Takarazuka | Takarazuka | host club | host club | masculinity | masculinity | seduction | seduction | Onnagata | Onnagata | Kabuki theater | Kabuki theater | idols | idols | virtual idol | virtual idol | games | games | Tokyo | Tokyo

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: Gender and Lyric -- Renaissance Men and Women Writing about Love (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: Gender and Lyric -- Renaissance Men and Women Writing about Love (MIT)

Description

The core of this seminar will be the great sequences of English love sonnets written by William Shakespeare, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and Mary Wroth. These poems cover an enormous amount of aesthetic and psychological ground: ranging from the utterly subjective to the entirely public or conventional, from licit to forbidden desires, they might also serve as a manual of experimentation with the resources of sound, rhythm, and figuration in poetry. Around these sequences, we will develop several other contexts, using both Renaissance texts and modern accounts: the Petrarchan literary tradition (poems by Francis Petrarch and Sir Thomas Wyatt); the social, political, and ethical uses of love poetry (seduction, getting famous, influencing policy, elevating morals, compensating for failure The core of this seminar will be the great sequences of English love sonnets written by William Shakespeare, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and Mary Wroth. These poems cover an enormous amount of aesthetic and psychological ground: ranging from the utterly subjective to the entirely public or conventional, from licit to forbidden desires, they might also serve as a manual of experimentation with the resources of sound, rhythm, and figuration in poetry. Around these sequences, we will develop several other contexts, using both Renaissance texts and modern accounts: the Petrarchan literary tradition (poems by Francis Petrarch and Sir Thomas Wyatt); the social, political, and ethical uses of love poetry (seduction, getting famous, influencing policy, elevating morals, compensating for failure

Subjects

English love sonnets | English love sonnets | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Philip Sidney | Philip Sidney | Edmund Spenser | Edmund Spenser | Mary Wroth | Mary Wroth | sound | sound | rhythm | rhythm | figuration | figuration | poetry | poetry | Petrarchan literary tradition | Petrarchan literary tradition | Francis Petrarch | Francis Petrarch | Sir Thomas Wyatt | Sir Thomas Wyatt | uses of love poetry | uses of love poetry | seduction | seduction | fame | fame | morals | morals | masculinity | masculinity | femininity | femininity | conduct manuals | conduct manuals | theories of gender and anatomy | theories of gender and anatomy | narrative poems | narrative poems | pornographic poems | pornographic poems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.110 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT) WGS.110 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality. This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

sex | sex | gender | gender | identity | identity | homosexual | homosexual | transgender | transgender | lesbian | lesbian | third sex | third sex | drag | drag | stonewall | stonewall | queer | queer | masculinity | masculinity | femininity | femininity | sexuality | sexuality | medicalization | medicalization | marriage | marriage | feminism | feminism | queer theory | queer theory | trans | trans | genderqueer | genderqueer | essentialism | essentialism | women | women | gender studies | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.840 At the Limit: Violence in Contemporary Representation (MIT) CMS.840 At the Limit: Violence in Contemporary Representation (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on novels and films from the last twenty-five years (nominally 1985–2010) marked by their relationship to extreme violence and transgression. Our texts will focus on serial killers, torture, rape, and brutality, but they also explore notions of American history, gender and sexuality, and reality television—sometimes, they delve into love or time or the redemptive role of art in late modernity. Our works are a motley assortment, with origins in the U.S., France, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Japan and South Korea. The broad global era marked by this period is one of acceleration, fragmentation, and late capitalism; however, we will also consider national specificities of violent representation, including particulars like the history of racism in the United States, This course focuses on novels and films from the last twenty-five years (nominally 1985–2010) marked by their relationship to extreme violence and transgression. Our texts will focus on serial killers, torture, rape, and brutality, but they also explore notions of American history, gender and sexuality, and reality television—sometimes, they delve into love or time or the redemptive role of art in late modernity. Our works are a motley assortment, with origins in the U.S., France, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Japan and South Korea. The broad global era marked by this period is one of acceleration, fragmentation, and late capitalism; however, we will also consider national specificities of violent representation, including particulars like the history of racism in the United States,

Subjects

violence | violence | serial | serial | killer | killer | psycho | psycho | masculinity | masculinity | white | white | sex | sex | rape | rape | assault | assault | underclass | underclass | boredom | boredom | repetition | repetition | America | America | Ellis | Ellis | Palahniuk | Palahniuk | fight | fight | club | club | Cooper | Cooper | frisk | frisk | Sontag | Sontag | pain | pain | ultraviolence | ultraviolence | squib | squib | metaphor | metaphor | Fargo | Fargo | Coen | Coen | Benjamin | Benjamin | commodities | commodities | blankness | blankness | beast | beast | Manson | Manson | portraits | portraits | signs | signs | Henry | Henry | Se7en | Se7en | Pitt | Pitt | Fincher | Fincher | desire | desire | fragmentation | fragmentation | television | television | TV | TV | reality | reality | culpability | culpability | Bazin | Bazin | Resevoir | Resevoir | Tarantino | Tarantino | postmodern | postmodern | gore | gore | cartoon | cartoon | humor | humor | Oldboy | Oldboy | Haneke | Haneke

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Manly Displays: Exhibitions and the Revival of the Olympic Games

Description

This article explores the shift from international exhibitions to the Modern Olympic Games as the preferred site for the public performance of manly character. As fin-de-siecle European and American societies increasingly grew concerned about the waning vitality of men and the individual's marginalization in a mechanized world, they sought out a new form of mass spectacle. National tensions grew that would eventually lead to WWI, and citizenry previously enraptured by the displays of state-directed competition at the international exhibitions were attracted to a venue in which the performance and effort of the individual was the central focus. The Games, particularly in the emergence of the marathon as the showcase event, became the preferred location for the performance of active masculi

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | modern Olympic Games | Pierre de Coubertin | masculinity | machismo | exhibitions | Athens 1896 | sports events | first Olympiad | World's Fair | Great Exhibition.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

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WGS.110 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

sex | gender | identity | homosexual | transgender | lesbian | third sex | drag | stonewall | queer | masculinity | femininity | sexuality | medicalization | marriage | feminism | queer theory | trans | genderqueer | essentialism | women | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.840 At the Limit: Violence in Contemporary Representation (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on novels and films from the last twenty-five years (nominally 1985–2010) marked by their relationship to extreme violence and transgression. Our texts will focus on serial killers, torture, rape, and brutality, but they also explore notions of American history, gender and sexuality, and reality television—sometimes, they delve into love or time or the redemptive role of art in late modernity. Our works are a motley assortment, with origins in the U.S., France, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Japan and South Korea. The broad global era marked by this period is one of acceleration, fragmentation, and late capitalism; however, we will also consider national specificities of violent representation, including particulars like the history of racism in the United States,

Subjects

violence | serial | killer | psycho | masculinity | white | sex | rape | assault | underclass | boredom | repetition | America | Ellis | Palahniuk | fight | club | Cooper | frisk | Sontag | pain | ultraviolence | squib | metaphor | Fargo | Coen | Benjamin | commodities | blankness | beast | Manson | portraits | signs | Henry | Se7en | Pitt | Fincher | desire | fragmentation | television | TV | reality | culpability | Bazin | Resevoir | Tarantino | postmodern | gore | cartoon | humor | Oldboy | Haneke

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

sex | gender | identity | homosexual | transgender | lesbian | third sex | drag | stonewall | queer | masculinity | femininity | sexuality | medicalization | marriage | feminism | queer theory | trans | genderqueer | essentialism | women | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.301J Feminist Thought (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes theories of gender and politics, especially ideologies of gender and their construction. Also discussed are definitions of public and private spheres, gender issues in citizenship, the development of the welfare state, experiences of war and revolution, class formation, and the politics of sexuality.Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

WGS.301 | 17.007 | 24.237 | feminism | feminist | sex | gender | oppression | Humanist approach | Gynocentric approach | Dominance approach | social construction | liberal | subjection | female | politics | pornography | lesbian | Simone de Beauvoir | Butler | domestic violence | prejudice | queer theory | masculinity | epistemic injustice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: Gender and Lyric -- Renaissance Men and Women Writing about Love (MIT)

Description

The core of this seminar will be the great sequences of English love sonnets written by William Shakespeare, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and Mary Wroth. These poems cover an enormous amount of aesthetic and psychological ground: ranging from the utterly subjective to the entirely public or conventional, from licit to forbidden desires, they might also serve as a manual of experimentation with the resources of sound, rhythm, and figuration in poetry. Around these sequences, we will develop several other contexts, using both Renaissance texts and modern accounts: the Petrarchan literary tradition (poems by Francis Petrarch and Sir Thomas Wyatt); the social, political, and ethical uses of love poetry (seduction, getting famous, influencing policy, elevating morals, compensating for failure

Subjects

English love sonnets | William Shakespeare | Philip Sidney | Edmund Spenser | Mary Wroth | sound | rhythm | figuration | poetry | Petrarchan literary tradition | Francis Petrarch | Sir Thomas Wyatt | uses of love poetry | seduction | fame | morals | masculinity | femininity | conduct manuals | theories of gender and anatomy | narrative poems | pornographic poems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in various media. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and consider how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

Sex | gender | identity | homosexual | transgender | lesbian | third sex | drag | stonewall | queer | masculinity | femininity | sexuality | medicalization | marriage | feminism | queer theory | trans | genderqueer | essentialism | women | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Pre-Raphaelite Online Resource: Learning Resources

Description

The Pre-Raphaelite Online Resource provides full record information and allows users to examine images in great detail. You can choose to browse the online collection, make simple searches or to interrogate the collection data using filtering tools. Learning resources have been created to support teaching and learning. They also demonstrate how the Pre-Raphaelite collection can be used by teachers and lecturers to create learning resources.

Subjects

illustration | wood engraving | edward burne-jones | pygmalion | gender | sexuality | androgyny | masculinity | femmes fatales | hair | virtuous women | ideal women | working women | desire | design | W000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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21G.039J Gender and Japanese Popular Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines relationships between identity and participation in Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities, and culture. It emphasizes contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power and value in global culture industries. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music, anime and feature films, video games, contemporary literature, and online communication. Students present analyses and develop a final project based on a particular aspect of gender and popular culture.

Subjects

gender | Japan | culture | Pecha Kucha | media theory | manga | inequality | economics | robots | technology | anime | anthropology | queer | transgender | hostess club | feminist social theory | gender traits | fujoshi | women | Princess Jellyfish | Kuragehime | convergence culture | participatory culture | capital | debt | power | slavery | sexism | Takarazuka | host club | masculinity | seduction | Onnagata | Kabuki theater | idols | virtual idol | games | Tokyo

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Manly Displays: Exhibitions and the Revival of the Olympic Games

Description

This article explores the shift from international exhibitions to the Modern Olympic Games as the preferred site for the public performance of manly character. As fin-de-siecle European and American societies increasingly grew concerned about the waning vitality of men and the individual's marginalization in a mechanized world, they sought out a new form of mass spectacle. National tensions grew that would eventually lead to WWI, and citizenry previously enraptured by the displays of state-directed competition at the international exhibitions were attracted to a venue in which the performance and effort of the individual was the central focus. The Games, particularly in the emergence of the marathon as the showcase event, became the preferred location for the performance of active masculi

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | modern Olympic Games | Pierre de Coubertin | masculinity | machismo | exhibitions | Athens 1896 | sports events | first Olympiad | World's Fair | Great Exhibition.

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Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

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21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity.

Subjects

21H.153 | 21G.069 | WGS.237 | racial and gender discourse | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | Asian American masculinity | Asian American feminisms | feminism | ethnic nationalism | gay and lesbian identity | class and labor issues | domestic violence | interracial dating and marriage | multiracial identity | SP.603J | SP.603

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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