Searching for material culture : 9 results found | RSS Feed for this search

Everyday aesthetics in forced displacement

Description

In this Anthropology Departmental Seminar, Sandra Dudley (University of Leicester) looks at 'material culture and Karenni forced migrants in a Thai-Burma border camp'. 10 February 2012. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

burma | material culture | anthropology | society | migration | thailand | borders | burma | material culture | anthropology | society | migration | thailand | borders

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | mysogyny | mysogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | political | political | aesthetic | aesthetic | musical | musical | corporeal | corporeal | visual | visual | spoken word | spoken word | literary | literary | American cultural imagery | American cultural imagery | African American | African American | cultural practices | cultural practices | material culture | material culture | performance studio | performance studio | hip hop style | hip hop style | rapping | rapping | break | break | breaking | breaking | beats | beats | dj | dj | dee jay | dee jay | turntables | turntables | mic | mic | mc | mc | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | sex | sex | feminist | feminist | electronica | electronica | mediated performance | mediated performance | anarchy | anarchy | commodity fetishism | commodity fetishism | globalization | globalization | whiteness | whiteness | realness | realness | journalism | journalism | criticism | criticism | autobiography | autobiography | black | black

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Furnishings and Domestic Culture in early Modern England

Description

A seminar presentation on doctoral research, employing probate inventories for the Oxfordshire market town of Thame in the 17th century. A presentation of doctoral research to the Archaeology and Local History seminar series at Kellogg College in November 2011, outlining theoretical and methodological approaches to the interpretation of probate inventories and other contemporary evidence in order to describe the experience of essentially non-elite daily life in the early modern period, and the changes in domestic culture which indicate wider shifts in modes of consumption and social relationships. The research also aimed to develop a better understanding of the operation of domestic culture; an interrelationship of material, social and conceptual elements. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

material culture | domestic culture | england | furnishings | probate inventories | early modern | Oxfordshire | material culture | domestic culture | england | furnishings | probate inventories | early modern | Oxfordshire

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT) 3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091. This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | materials of nature | objects of material culture | objects of material culture | glass | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | metals | Mesoamerica | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | materials development | ancient glass | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | rubber processing | materials processing | materials processing | materials engineering | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | pre-modern technology | ceramics | ceramics | fibers | fibers | ideology | ideology | values | values | anthropology | anthropology | archaeology | archaeology | history | history | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | objects of material culture | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | materials processing | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | ceramics | fibers | ideology | values | anthropology | archaeology | history | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Podcasting the Ancient World

Description

The website hosts a range of podcasts to enhance the learning experience of students. Two areas were chosen: Classical Archaeology and Egyptology. The materials were designed to support teaching in two areas. The first year (level 1) introductory module to Greek Archaeology and the second, the second and third years (combined) module (levels 2and 3) on Images of Power in the Greek and Roman Worlds. The project will help to develop students' personal reflection on material culture and archaeological sites. This site is still under development.

Subjects

podcast | podcasts | podcasting | classical archaeology | archaeology | egyptology | reflection | material culture | archaeological sites | Historical and Philosophical studies | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Historical Methodology: The Art and Craft of the Historian

Description

Historical Methodology will introduce the student to historical research methods and familiarize the student with the tools and techniques that historians use to study the past. The student will learn about the process of modern historical inquiry and gain a better understanding of the diverse resources that historians use to conduct research. The first four units will focus on research methodology and examine how and why historians conduct research on the past. Later units will examine how different historical resources can be used for historical research. By the end of the course, the student will understand how to conduct research on past events and be familiar with the variety of physical and electronic resources available for historical research. This free course may be completed

Subjects

history | research | primary resources | secondary resources | thesis | quantitative | qualitative | historiography | libraries | archives | electronic | oral history | material culture | cultural analysis | careers | dissemination | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Dance | Rap | Black | visual culture | Music | African | American | history | literature | sexuality | mysogyny | feminism | performance | electronic music | activism | politics | consumerism | race | artist | political | aesthetic | musical | corporeal | visual | spoken word | literary | American cultural imagery | African American | cultural practices | material culture | performance studio | hip hop style | rapping | break | breaking | beats | dj | dee jay | turntables | mic | mc | graffiti | fashion | sex | feminist | electronica | mediated performance | anarchy | commodity fetishism | globalization | whiteness | realness | journalism | criticism | autobiography | black

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | objects of material culture | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | materials processing | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | ceramics | fibers | ideology | values | anthropology | archaeology | history | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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