Searching for materials : 3587 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143

Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering

Description

In this subject, it is intended that students learn the basics of materials science, the classification of the various families of materials, their properties and applications, and the technology available for the improvement of their properties. In this subject, it is intended that students learn the basics of materials science, the classification of the various families of materials, their properties and applications, and the technology available for the improvement of their properties.

Subjects

materials science | materials science | ceramic materials | ceramic materials | mechanical properties | mechanical properties | families of materials | families of materials | phase diagrams | phase diagrams | materails science and engineering | materails science and engineering | a Mecnica | a Mecnica | functional properties | functional properties | a Metalrgica | a Metalrgica | composite materials | composite materials | structure of materials | structure of materials | a Elctrica | a Elctrica | metallic materials | metallic materials | 2010 | 2010 | polymeric materials | polymeric materials | bonding in solids | bonding in solids | a Electrnica Industrial y Automtica | a Electrnica Industrial y Automtica

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

Site sourced from

http://ocw.uc3m.es/ocwuniversia/rss_all

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science (MIT) 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science (MIT)

Description

This subject describes the fundamentals of bonding, energetics, and structure that underpin materials science. From electrons to silicon to DNA: the role of electronic bonding in determining the energy, structure, and stability of materials. Quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms. Symmetry properties of molecules and solids. Structure of complex and disordered materials. Introduction to thermodynamic functions and laws governing equilibrium properties, relating macroscopic behavior to molecular models of materials. Develops basis for understanding a broad range of materials phenomena, from heat capacities, phase transformations, and multiphase equilibria to chemical reactions and magnetism. Fundamentals are taught using real-world examples such as engineered all This subject describes the fundamentals of bonding, energetics, and structure that underpin materials science. From electrons to silicon to DNA: the role of electronic bonding in determining the energy, structure, and stability of materials. Quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms. Symmetry properties of molecules and solids. Structure of complex and disordered materials. Introduction to thermodynamic functions and laws governing equilibrium properties, relating macroscopic behavior to molecular models of materials. Develops basis for understanding a broad range of materials phenomena, from heat capacities, phase transformations, and multiphase equilibria to chemical reactions and magnetism. Fundamentals are taught using real-world examples such as engineered all

Subjects

fundamentals of bonding | energetics | and structure | fundamentals of bonding | energetics | and structure | Quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms | Quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms | Symmetry properties of molecules and solids | Symmetry properties of molecules and solids | complex and disordered materials | complex and disordered materials | thermodynamic functions | thermodynamic functions | equilibrium properties | equilibrium properties | macroscopic behavior | macroscopic behavior | molecular models | molecular models | heat capacities | heat capacities | phase transformations | phase transformations | multiphase equilibria | multiphase equilibria | chemical reactions | chemical reactions | magnetism | magnetism | engineered alloys | engineered alloys | electronic and magnetic materials | electronic and magnetic materials | ionic and network solids | ionic and network solids | polymers | polymers | biomaterials | biomaterials | energetics | energetics | structure | structure | materials science | materials science | electrons | electrons | silicon | silicon | DNA | DNA | electronic bonding | electronic bonding | energy | energy | stability | stability | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | atoms | atoms | interactions | interactions | symmetry | symmetry | molecules | molecules | solids | solids | complex material | complex material | disorderd materials | disorderd materials | thermodynamic laws | thermodynamic laws | electronic materials | electronic materials | magnetic materials | magnetic materials | ionic solids | ionic solids | network solids | network solids | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | microstates | microstates | microscopic complexity | microscopic complexity | entropy | entropy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers (MIT) 3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers (MIT)

Description

The class will cover mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials. The class uses examples from 3.012 to introduce mathematical concepts and materials-related problem solving skills. Topics include linear algebra and orthonormal basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, tensor operations, symmetry operations, calculus of several variables, introduction to complex analysis, ordinary and partial differential equations, theory of distributions, fourier analysis and random walks.Technical RequirementsMathematica® software is required to run the .nb files found on this course site. The class will cover mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials. The class uses examples from 3.012 to introduce mathematical concepts and materials-related problem solving skills. Topics include linear algebra and orthonormal basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, tensor operations, symmetry operations, calculus of several variables, introduction to complex analysis, ordinary and partial differential equations, theory of distributions, fourier analysis and random walks.Technical RequirementsMathematica® software is required to run the .nb files found on this course site.

Subjects

energetics | energetics | materials structure and symmetry: applied fields | materials structure and symmetry: applied fields | mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials | mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials | linear algebra | linear algebra | orthonormal basis | orthonormal basis | eigenvalues | eigenvalues | eigenvectors | eigenvectors | quadratic forms | quadratic forms | tensor operations | tensor operations | symmetry operations | symmetry operations | calculus | calculus | complex analysis | complex analysis | differential equations | differential equations | theory of distributions | theory of distributions | fourier analysis | fourier analysis | random walks | random walks | mathematical technicques | mathematical technicques | materials science | materials science | materials engineering | materials engineering | materials structure | materials structure | symmetry | symmetry | applied fields | applied fields | materials response | materials response | solids mechanics | solids mechanics | solids physics | solids physics | soft materials | soft materials | multi-variable calculus | multi-variable calculus | ordinary differential equations | ordinary differential equations | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | applied mathematics | applied mathematics | mathematical techniques | mathematical techniques

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings | 16.01 | 16.01 | 16.02 | 16.02 | 16.03 | 16.03 | 16.04 | 16.04

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT) 3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th

Subjects

Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | stress-strain relationships | stress-strain relationships | stress transformation | stress transformation | elasticity | elasticity | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | bubble raft models | bubble raft models | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | plasticity and fracture | plasticity and fracture | Case studies | Case studies | materials selection | materials selection | bicycle frames | bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants | stress shielding in biomedical implants | residual stresses in thin films | residual stresses in thin films | ancient materials | ancient materials | standard mechanical tests | standard mechanical tests | solid mechanics | solid mechanics | mechanical behavior of materials | mechanical behavior of materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.002 Mechanics and Materials II (MIT) 2.002 Mechanics and Materials II (MIT)

Description

This course provides Mechanical Engineering students with an awareness of various responses exhibited by solid engineering materials when subjected to mechanical and thermal loadings; an introduction to the physical mechanisms associated with design-limiting behavior of engineering materials, especially stiffness, strength, toughness, and durability; an understanding of basic mechanical properties of engineering materials, testing procedures used to quantify these properties, and ways in which these properties characterize material response; quantitative skills to deal with materials-limiting problems in engineering design; and a basis for materials selection in mechanical design. This course provides Mechanical Engineering students with an awareness of various responses exhibited by solid engineering materials when subjected to mechanical and thermal loadings; an introduction to the physical mechanisms associated with design-limiting behavior of engineering materials, especially stiffness, strength, toughness, and durability; an understanding of basic mechanical properties of engineering materials, testing procedures used to quantify these properties, and ways in which these properties characterize material response; quantitative skills to deal with materials-limiting problems in engineering design; and a basis for materials selection in mechanical design.

Subjects

beam bending | beam bending | buckling | buckling | vibration | vibration | polymers | polymers | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | strength | strength | ductility | ductility | stress | stress | stress concentration | stress concentration | sheet bending | sheet bending | heat treatment | heat treatment | fracture | fracture | plasticity | plasticity | creep | creep | fatigue | fatigue | solid materials | solid materials | mechanical loading | mechanical loading | thermal loading | thermal loading | design-limiting behavior | design-limiting behavior | stiffness | stiffness | toughness | toughness | durability | durability | engineering materials | engineering materials | materials-limiting problem | materials-limiting problem | materials selection | materials selection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT) 3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091. This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | materials of nature | objects of material culture | objects of material culture | glass | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | metals | Mesoamerica | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | materials development | ancient glass | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | rubber processing | materials processing | materials processing | materials engineering | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | pre-modern technology | ceramics | ceramics | fibers | fibers | ideology | ideology | values | values | anthropology | anthropology | archaeology | archaeology | history | history | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.45 Magnetic Materials (MIT) 3.45 Magnetic Materials (MIT)

Description

This course will cover the following topics: Magnetostatics Origin of magnetism in materials Magnetic domains and domain walls Magnetic anisotropy Reversible and irreversible magnetization processes Hard and soft magnetic materials Magnetic recording Special topics include magnetism of thin films, surfaces and fine particles; transport in ferromagnets, magnetoresistive sensors, and amorphous magnetic materials. This course will cover the following topics: Magnetostatics Origin of magnetism in materials Magnetic domains and domain walls Magnetic anisotropy Reversible and irreversible magnetization processes Hard and soft magnetic materials Magnetic recording Special topics include magnetism of thin films, surfaces and fine particles; transport in ferromagnets, magnetoresistive sensors, and amorphous magnetic materials.

Subjects

Magnetostatics; magnetism; magnetic domains and domain walls; magnetic anisotropy; reversible and irreversible magnetization; hard and soft magnetic materials; magnetic recording; thin films; ferromagnets | Magnetostatics; magnetism; magnetic domains and domain walls; magnetic anisotropy; reversible and irreversible magnetization; hard and soft magnetic materials; magnetic recording; thin films; ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors; amorphous magnetic materials | magnetoresistive sensors; amorphous magnetic materials | Magnetostatics | Magnetostatics | magnetism | magnetism | magnetic domains and domain walls | magnetic domains and domain walls | magnetic anisotropy | magnetic anisotropy | reversible and irreversible magnetization | reversible and irreversible magnetization | hard and soft magnetic materials | hard and soft magnetic materials | magnetic recording | magnetic recording | thin films | thin films | ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors | ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors | amorphous magnetic materials | amorphous magnetic materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science (MIT)

Description

This subject describes the fundamentals of bonding, energetics, and structure that underpin materials science. From electrons to silicon to DNA: the role of electronic bonding in determining the energy, structure, and stability of materials. Quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms. Symmetry properties of molecules and solids. Structure of complex and disordered materials. Introduction to thermodynamic functions and laws governing equilibrium properties, relating macroscopic behavior to molecular models of materials. Develops basis for understanding a broad range of materials phenomena, from heat capacities, phase transformations, and multiphase equilibria to chemical reactions and magnetism. Fundamentals are taught using real-world examples such as engineered all

Subjects

fundamentals of bonding | energetics | and structure | Quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms | Symmetry properties of molecules and solids | complex and disordered materials | thermodynamic functions | equilibrium properties | macroscopic behavior | molecular models | heat capacities | phase transformations | multiphase equilibria | chemical reactions | magnetism | engineered alloys | electronic and magnetic materials | ionic and network solids | polymers | biomaterials | energetics | structure | materials science | electrons | silicon | DNA | electronic bonding | energy | stability | quantum mechanics | atoms | interactions | symmetry | molecules | solids | complex material | disorderd materials | thermodynamic laws | electronic materials | magnetic materials | ionic solids | network solids | statistical mechanics | microstates | microscopic complexity | entropy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers (MIT)

Description

The class will cover mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials. The class uses examples from 3.012 to introduce mathematical concepts and materials-related problem solving skills. Topics include linear algebra and orthonormal basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, tensor operations, symmetry operations, calculus of several variables, introduction to complex analysis, ordinary and partial differential equations, theory of distributions, fourier analysis and random walks.Technical RequirementsMathematica® software is required to run the .nb files found on this course site.

Subjects

energetics | materials structure and symmetry: applied fields | mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials | linear algebra | orthonormal basis | eigenvalues | eigenvectors | quadratic forms | tensor operations | symmetry operations | calculus | complex analysis | differential equations | theory of distributions | fourier analysis | random walks | mathematical technicques | materials science | materials engineering | materials structure | symmetry | applied fields | materials response | solids mechanics | solids physics | soft materials | multi-variable calculus | ordinary differential equations | partial differential equations | applied mathematics | mathematical techniques

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others. This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others.

Subjects

metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | bonding | bonding | structure | structure | energy band | energy band | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | optical detectors | sensors | sensors | thin films | thin films | biomaterials | biomaterials | cellular materials | cellular materials | magnetism | magnetism | polarity | polarity | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | plasticity | fracture | fracture | materials selection | materials selection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th

Subjects

Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | stress-strain relationships | stress transformation | elasticity | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | bubble raft models | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | plasticity and fracture | Case studies | materials selection | bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants | residual stresses in thin films | ancient materials | standard mechanical tests | solid mechanics | mechanical behavior of materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified Engineering | aerospace | CDIO | C-D-I-O | conceive | design | implement | operate | team | team-based | discipline | materials | structures | materials and structures | computers | programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | propulsion | signals | systems | signals and systems | systems problems | fundamentals | technical communication | graphical communication | communication | reading | research | experimentation | personal response system | prs | active learning | First law | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | work | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | energy exchange | processes | heat engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | flows | path-dependence | path-independence | reversibility | irreversibility | state | thermodynamic state | performance | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | cycles | thermal pressures | temperatures | linear static networks | loop method | node method | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | state methods | state concepts | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | sources | voltages | currents | Thevinin | Norton | initial value problems | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | transfer function | ada | ada programming | programming language | software systems | programming style | computer architecture | program language evolution | classification | numerical computation | number representation systems | assembly | SimpleSIM | RISC | CISC | operating systems | single user | multitasking | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | recursive | execution time | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | mach | reynolds | conservation | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | continuity | inviscid | steady flow | simple bodies | airfoils | wings | channels | aerodynamics | forces | moments | equilibrium | freebody diagram | free-body | free body | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | support reactions | reactions | static determinance | determinate systems | truss analysis | trusses | method of joints | method of sections | statically indeterminate | three great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | stress | extensional stress | shear stress | notation | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | mohr | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | strain | extensional strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | compatibility | strain transformation | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | classes of materials | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | atomic packing | crystals | crystal structures | polymers | estimate of moduli | moduli | composites | composite materials | modulus limited design | material selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | orthotropy | measurements | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | models | engineering systems | experiments | investigations | experimental error | design evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | effects of engineering | social context | engineering drawings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.342 Cell-material Crosstalk: Engineering Cell-Instructive Biomaterials (MIT) 7.342 Cell-material Crosstalk: Engineering Cell-Instructive Biomaterials (MIT)

Description

Biomaterials are substances that have been designed to direct the course of any therapeutic or diagnostic procedure by controlling interactions with biological systems. A large toolbox of non-biological materials has been engineered to study cell behavior at the cell-material interface. In this course, we will examine how this interface can be leveraged to study cellular systems and generate novel therapeutics. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong int Biomaterials are substances that have been designed to direct the course of any therapeutic or diagnostic procedure by controlling interactions with biological systems. A large toolbox of non-biological materials has been engineered to study cell behavior at the cell-material interface. In this course, we will examine how this interface can be leveraged to study cellular systems and generate novel therapeutics. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong int

Subjects

Biomaterials | Biomaterials | cell-material interface | cell-material interface | biology | biology | engineering | engineering | cell behavior | cell behavior | substrate materials | substrate materials | biological processes | biological processes | nonbiological materials | nonbiological materials | Mechanobiology | Mechanobiology | Biomimetic signaling | Biomimetic signaling | Nanoparticles | Nanoparticles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files

Subjects

Unified | Unified Engineering | aerospace | CDIO | C-D-I-O | conceive | design | implement | operate | team | team-based | discipline | materials | structures | materials and structures | computers | programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | propulsion | signals | systems | signals and systems | systems problems | fundamentals | technical communication | graphical communication | communication | reading | research | experimentation | personal response system | prs | active learning | First law | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | work | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | energy exchange | processes | heat engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | flows | path-dependence | path-independence | reversibility | irreversibility | state | thermodynamic state | performance | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | cycles | thermal pressures | temperatures | linear static networks | loop method | node method | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | state methods | state concepts | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | sources | voltages | currents | Thevinin | Norton | initial value problems | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | transfer function | ada | ada programming | programming language | software systems | programming style | computer architecture | program language evolution | classification | numerical computation | number representation systems | assembly | SimpleSIM | RISC | CISC | operating systems | single user | multitasking | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | recursive | execution time | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | mach | reynolds | conservation | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | continuity | inviscid | steady flow | simple bodies | airfoils | wings | channels | aerodynamics | forces | moments | equilibrium | freebody diagram | free-body | free body | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | support reactions | reactions | static determinance | determinate systems | truss analysis | trusses | method of joints | method of sections | statically indeterminate | three great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | stress | extensional stress | shear stress | notation | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | mohr | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | strain | extensional strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | compatibility | strain transformation | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | classes of materials | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | atomic packing | crystals | crystal structures | polymers | estimate of moduli | moduli | composites | composite materials | modulus limited design | material selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | orthotropy | measurements | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | models | engineering systems | experiments | investigations | experimental error | design evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | effects of engineering | social context | engineering drawings | 16.01 | 16.02 | 16.03 | 16.04

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified Engineering | aerospace | CDIO | C-D-I-O | conceive | design | implement | operate | team | team-based | discipline | materials | structures | materials and structures | computers | programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | propulsion | signals | systems | signals and systems | systems problems | fundamentals | technical communication | graphical communication | communication | reading | research | experimentation | personal response system | prs | active learning | First law | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | work | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | energy exchange | processes | heat engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | flows | path-dependence | path-independence | reversibility | irreversibility | state | thermodynamic state | performance | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | cycles | thermal pressures | temperatures | linear static networks | loop method | node method | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | state methods | state concepts | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | sources | voltages | currents | Thevinin | Norton | initial value problems | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | transfer function | ada | ada programming | programming language | software systems | programming style | computer architecture | program language evolution | classification | numerical computation | number representation systems | assembly | SimpleSIM | RISC | CISC | operating systems | single user | multitasking | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | recursive | execution time | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | mach | reynolds | conservation | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | continuity | inviscid | steady flow | simple bodies | airfoils | wings | channels | aerodynamics | forces | moments | equilibrium | freebody diagram | free-body | free body | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | support reactions | reactions | static determinance | determinate systems | truss analysis | trusses | method of joints | method of sections | statically indeterminate | three great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | stress | extensional stress | shear stress | notation | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | mohr | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | strain | extensional strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | compatibility | strain transformation | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | classes of materials | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | atomic packing | crystals | crystal structures | polymers | estimate of moduli | moduli | composites | composite materials | modulus limited design | material selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | orthotropy | measurements | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | models | engineering systems | experiments | investigations | experimental error | design evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | effects of engineering | social context | engineering drawings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th

Subjects

Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | stress-strain relationships | stress transformation | elasticity | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | bubble raft models | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | plasticity and fracture | Case studies | materials selection | bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants | residual stresses in thin films | ancient materials | standard mechanical tests | solid mechanics | mechanical behavior of materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.22 Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.22 Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course explores the phenomenology of mechanical behavior of materials at the macroscopic level and the relationship of mechanical behavior to material structure and mechanisms of deformation and failure. Topics covered include elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, creep, fracture, and fatigue. Case studies and examples are drawn from structural and functional applications that include a variety of material classes: metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, composites, and cellular materials. This course explores the phenomenology of mechanical behavior of materials at the macroscopic level and the relationship of mechanical behavior to material structure and mechanisms of deformation and failure. Topics covered include elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, creep, fracture, and fatigue. Case studies and examples are drawn from structural and functional applications that include a variety of material classes: metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, composites, and cellular materials.

Subjects

metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | bonding | bonding | structure | structure | energy band | energy band | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | optical detectors | sensors | sensors | thin films | thin films | biomaterials | biomaterials | cellular materials | cellular materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

Electrical, optical, magnetic, and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and polymers. Discussion of roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band, and microstructure), and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties. Case studies drawn from a variety of applications including semiconductor diodes, optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites, and cellular materials. Electrical, optical, magnetic, and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and polymers. Discussion of roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band, and microstructure), and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties. Case studies drawn from a variety of applications including semiconductor diodes, optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites, and cellular materials.

Subjects

metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | bonding | bonding | energy band | energy band | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | optical detectors | sensors | sensors | thin films | thin films | biomaterials | biomaterials | cellular materials | cellular materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT) Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance. This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | electrical conductivity | doping | doping | transistors | transistors | photodectors | photodectors | photovoltaics | photovoltaics | luminescence | luminescence | light emitting diodes | light emitting diodes | lasers | lasers | optical phenomena | optical phenomena | photonics | photonics | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance | magnetoresistance | electrical devices | electrical devices | optical devices | optical devices | magnetic devices | magnetic devices | materials | materials | device applications | device applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

BE.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (MIT) BE.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (MIT)

Description

Bioengineering at MIT is represented by the diverse curricula offered by most Departments in the School of Engineering. This course samples the wide variety of bioengineering options for students who plan to major in one of the undergraduate Engineering degree programs. The beginning lectures describe the science basis for bioengineering with particular emphasis on molecular cell biology and systems biology. Bioengineering faculty will then describe the bioengineering options in a particular engineering course as well as the type of research conducted by faculty in the department.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .rm, .mp3. Bioengineering at MIT is represented by the diverse curricula offered by most Departments in the School of Engineering. This course samples the wide variety of bioengineering options for students who plan to major in one of the undergraduate Engineering degree programs. The beginning lectures describe the science basis for bioengineering with particular emphasis on molecular cell biology and systems biology. Bioengineering faculty will then describe the bioengineering options in a particular engineering course as well as the type of research conducted by faculty in the department.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .rm, .mp3.

Subjects

biological engineering | biological engineering | bioengineering | bioengineering | biomems | biomems | biomaterials | biomaterials | biomechanical engineering | biomechanical engineering | biology | biology | engineering | engineering | bioprocessing | bioprocessing | biological materials | biological materials | biological engineers | biological engineers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

BE.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (MIT) BE.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (MIT)

Description

Designed as a freshmen seminar course, faculty from various School of Engineering departments describe the bioengineering research and educational opportunities specific to and offered by their departments. Background lectures by the BE.010J staff introduce students to the fundamental scientific basis for bioengineering. Specially produced videos provide additional background information that is supplemented with readings from newspaper and magazine articles.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player is required to run the .rm files found in this course. Designed as a freshmen seminar course, faculty from various School of Engineering departments describe the bioengineering research and educational opportunities specific to and offered by their departments. Background lectures by the BE.010J staff introduce students to the fundamental scientific basis for bioengineering. Specially produced videos provide additional background information that is supplemented with readings from newspaper and magazine articles.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player is required to run the .rm files found in this course.

Subjects

biological engineering | biological engineering | bioengineering | bioengineering | biomems | biomems | biomaterials | biomaterials | biomechanical engineering | biomechanical engineering | biology | biology | engineering | engineering | bioprocessing | bioprocessing | biological materials | biological materials | biological engineers | biological engineers | BE.010 | BE.010 | 2.790 | 2.790 | 6.025 | 6.025 | 7.38 | 7.38 | 10.010 | 10.010

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.461 Building Technology I: Materials and Construction (MIT) 4.461 Building Technology I: Materials and Construction (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to the history, theory, and construction of basic structural systems as well as an introduction to energy issues in buildings. It emphasizes basic systematic and elemental behavior, principles of structural behavior, and analysis of individual structural elements and strategies for load carrying. The course also introduces fundamental energy topics including thermodynamics, psychrometrics, and comfort. It is a required class for M. Arch. students. This course offers an introduction to the history, theory, and construction of basic structural systems as well as an introduction to energy issues in buildings. It emphasizes basic systematic and elemental behavior, principles of structural behavior, and analysis of individual structural elements and strategies for load carrying. The course also introduces fundamental energy topics including thermodynamics, psychrometrics, and comfort. It is a required class for M. Arch. students.

Subjects

structures | structures | building technology | building technology | construction | construction | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | reactions | reactions | truss analysis | truss analysis | stability of structures | stability of structures | stress and strain at a point | stress and strain at a point | shear and bending moment diagrams | shear and bending moment diagrams | stresses in beams | stresses in beams | Mohr's Circle | Mohr's Circle | column buckling | column buckling | deflection of beams | deflection of beams | materials | materials | wood | wood | steel | steel | concrete | concrete

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

RES.2-002 Finite Element Procedures for Solids and Structures (MIT) RES.2-002 Finite Element Procedures for Solids and Structures (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Finite element analysis is now widely used for solving complex static and dynamic problems encountered in engineering and the sciences. In these two video courses, Professor K. J. Bathe, a researcher of world renown in the field of finite element analysis, teaches the basic principles used for effective finite element analysis, describes the general assumptions, and discusses the implementation of finite element procedures for linear and nonlinear analyses. These videos were produced in 1982 and 1986 by the MIT Center for Advanced Engineering Study. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Finite element analysis is now widely used for solving complex static and dynamic problems encountered in engineering and the sciences. In these two video courses, Professor K. J. Bathe, a researcher of world renown in the field of finite element analysis, teaches the basic principles used for effective finite element analysis, describes the general assumptions, and discusses the implementation of finite element procedures for linear and nonlinear analyses. These videos were produced in 1982 and 1986 by the MIT Center for Advanced Engineering Study.

Subjects

finite element method | finite element method | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | linear analysis | linear analysis | nonlinear analysis | nonlinear analysis | computer modeling | computer modeling | engineering design | engineering design | solids | solids | structures | structures | wave propagation | wave propagation | vibration | vibration | collapse | collapse | buckling | buckling | Lagrangian formulation | Lagrangian formulation | truss | truss | beam | beam | plate | plate | shell | shell | elastic materials | elastic materials | plastic materials | plastic materials | creep | creep | ADINA | ADINA | numerical integration methods | numerical integration methods | mode superposition | mode superposition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata