Searching for mathematics : 672 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT) 18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic. This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic.

Subjects

discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math | discrete math | discrete mathematics | discrete mathematics | discrete | discrete | math | math | mathematics | mathematics | seminar | seminar | presentations | presentations | student presentations | student presentations | oral | oral | communication | communication | stable marriage | stable marriage | dych | dych | emergency | emergency | response vehicles | response vehicles | ambulance | ambulance | game theory | game theory | congruences | congruences | color theorem | color theorem | four color | four color | cake cutting | cake cutting | algorithm | algorithm | RSA | RSA | encryption | encryption | numberical integration | numberical integration | sorting | sorting | post correspondence problem | post correspondence problem | PCP | PCP | ramsey | ramsey | van der waals | van der waals | fibonacci | fibonacci | recursion | recursion | domino | domino | tiling | tiling | towers | towers | hanoi | hanoi | pigeonhole | pigeonhole | principle | principle | matrix | matrix | hamming | hamming | code | code | hat game | hat game | juggling | juggling | zero-knowledge | zero-knowledge | proof | proof | repeated games | repeated games | lewis carroll | lewis carroll | determinants | determinants | infinitude of primes | infinitude of primes | bridges | bridges | konigsberg | konigsberg | koenigsberg | koenigsberg | time series analysis | time series analysis | GARCH | GARCH | rational | rational | recurrence | recurrence | relations | relations | digital | digital | image | image | compression | compression | quantum computing | quantum computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT) 18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic. This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic.

Subjects

discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math | discrete math | discrete mathematics | discrete mathematics | discrete | discrete | math | math | mathematics | mathematics | seminar | seminar | presentations | presentations | student presentations | student presentations | oral | oral | communication | communication | stable marriage | stable marriage | dych | dych | emergency | emergency | response vehicles | response vehicles | ambulance | ambulance | game theory | game theory | congruences | congruences | color theorem | color theorem | four color | four color | cake cutting | cake cutting | algorithm | algorithm | RSA | RSA | encryption | encryption | numberical integration | numberical integration | sorting | sorting | post correspondence problem | post correspondence problem | PCP | PCP | ramsey | ramsey | van der waals | van der waals | fibonacci | fibonacci | recursion | recursion | domino | domino | tiling | tiling | towers | towers | hanoi | hanoi | pigeonhole | pigeonhole | principle | principle | matrix | matrix | hamming | hamming | code | code | hat game | hat game | juggling | juggling | zero-knowledge | zero-knowledge | proof | proof | repeated games | repeated games | lewis carroll | lewis carroll | determinants | determinants | infinitude of primes | infinitude of primes | bridges | bridges | konigsberg | konigsberg | koenigsberg | koenigsberg | time series analysis | time series analysis | GARCH | GARCH | rational | rational | recurrence | recurrence | relations | relations | digital | digital | image | image | compression | compression | quantum computing | quantum computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

22.00J Introduction to Modeling and Simulation (MIT) 22.00J Introduction to Modeling and Simulation (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the basic concepts of computer modeling in science and engineering using discrete particle systems and continuum fields. It covers techniques and software for statistical sampling, simulation, data analysis and visualization, and uses statistical, quantum chemical, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, mesoscale and continuum methods to study fundamental physical phenomena encountered in the fields of computational physics, chemistry, mechanics, materials science, biology, and applied mathematics. Applications are drawn from a range of disciplines to build a broad-based understanding of complex structures and interactions in problems where simulation is on equal footing with theory and experiment. A term project allows development of individual interests. Students are mentor This course surveys the basic concepts of computer modeling in science and engineering using discrete particle systems and continuum fields. It covers techniques and software for statistical sampling, simulation, data analysis and visualization, and uses statistical, quantum chemical, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, mesoscale and continuum methods to study fundamental physical phenomena encountered in the fields of computational physics, chemistry, mechanics, materials science, biology, and applied mathematics. Applications are drawn from a range of disciplines to build a broad-based understanding of complex structures and interactions in problems where simulation is on equal footing with theory and experiment. A term project allows development of individual interests. Students are mentor

Subjects

computer modeling | computer modeling | discrete particle system | discrete particle system | continuum | continuum | continuum field | continuum field | statistical sampling | statistical sampling | data analysis | data analysis | visualization | visualization | quantum | quantum | quantum method | quantum method | chemical | chemical | molecular dynamics | molecular dynamics | Monte Carlo | Monte Carlo | mesoscale | mesoscale | continuum method | continuum method | computational physics | computational physics | chemistry | chemistry | mechanics | mechanics | materials science | materials science | biology; applied mathematics | biology; applied mathematics | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | heat | heat | fractal | fractal | evolution | evolution | melting | melting | gas | gas | structural mechanics | structural mechanics | FEM | FEM | finite element | finite element | biology | biology | applied mathematics | applied mathematics | 1.021 | 1.021 | 2.030 | 2.030 | 3.021 | 3.021 | 10.333 | 10.333 | 18.361 | 18.361 | HST.588 | HST.588 | 22.00 | 22.00

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.231 Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control (MIT) 6.231 Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control (MIT)

Description

This course covers the basic models and solution techniques for problems of sequential decision making under uncertainty (stochastic control). Approximation methods for problems involving large state spaces are also presented and discussed. This course covers the basic models and solution techniques for problems of sequential decision making under uncertainty (stochastic control). Approximation methods for problems involving large state spaces are also presented and discussed.

Subjects

dynamic programming | dynamic programming | | stochastic control | | stochastic control | | mathematics | optimization | | | mathematics | optimization | | algorithms | | algorithms | | probability | | probability | | Markov chains | | Markov chains | | optimal control | optimal control | stochastic control | stochastic control | mathematics | mathematics | optimization | optimization | algorithms | algorithms | probability | probability | Markov chains | Markov chains

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.091 Mathematical Exposition (MIT) 18.091 Mathematical Exposition (MIT)

Description

This course provides techniques of effective presentation of mathematical material. Each section of this course is associated with a regular mathematics subject, and uses the material of that subject as a basis for written and oral presentations. The section presented here is on chaotic dynamical systems. This course provides techniques of effective presentation of mathematical material. Each section of this course is associated with a regular mathematics subject, and uses the material of that subject as a basis for written and oral presentations. The section presented here is on chaotic dynamical systems.

Subjects

oral presentation | oral presentation | mathematics writing | mathematics writing | mathematics presentation | mathematics presentation | 17.881 | 17.881 | 17.882 | 17.882

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT) 18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic. This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic.

Subjects

discrete math | discrete math | discrete mathematics | discrete mathematics | presentations | presentations | student presentations | student presentations | oral communication | oral communication | combinatorics | combinatorics | graph theory | graph theory | Proofs from the Book | Proofs from the Book | mathematics communication | mathematics communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Teaching secondary mathematics

Description

This free course will identify and explore some of the key issues around teaching mathematics in secondary schools. Through coming to understand these issues and debates

Subjects

Mathematics Education | Professional Development in Education | Teacher Training | EXM885_1 | mathematics | mathematics education | mathematics teacher | mathematics pedagogy

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/feeds/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Teaching secondary mathematics

Description

This free course, Teaching secondary mathematics, will identify and explore some of the key issues around teaching mathematics in secondary schools. Through coming to understand these issues and debates, you will reflect on and develop your practice as a mathematics teacher and develop a greater awareness of the wider context of mathematics education and how this affects mathematics in the secondary school curriculum. First published on Wed, 22 Jun 2016 as Teaching secondary mathematics. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Education | Education Careers | EXM885_1 | mathematics | mathematics education | mathematics teacher | mathematics pedagogy

License

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic.

Subjects

discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math | discrete mathematics | discrete | math | mathematics | seminar | presentations | student presentations | oral | communication | stable marriage | dych | emergency | response vehicles | ambulance | game theory | congruences | color theorem | four color | cake cutting | algorithm | RSA | encryption | numberical integration | sorting | post correspondence problem | PCP | ramsey | van der waals | fibonacci | recursion | domino | tiling | towers | hanoi | pigeonhole | principle | matrix | hamming | code | hat game | juggling | zero-knowledge | proof | repeated games | lewis carroll | determinants | infinitude of primes | bridges | konigsberg | koenigsberg | time series analysis | GARCH | rational | recurrence | relations | digital | image | compression | quantum computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Teaching secondary mathematics

Description

This free course will identify and explore some of the key issues around teaching mathematics in secondary schools. Through coming to understand these issues and debates you will reflect on and develop your practice as a mathematics teacher and develop a greater awareness of the wider context of mathematics education and how this affects mathematics in the secondary school curriculum.

Subjects

Education | Education Careers | EXM885_1 | mathematics | mathematics education | mathematics teacher | mathematics pedagogy

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/feeds/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Network mathematics in the social sciences: concepts, applications, and perspectives into obesity and public health

Description

Mariano Beguerisse-Diaz,Department of Mathematics and Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, gives a talk for the UBVO Seminar Series on 31st January 2013. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

obesity | public health | Network mathematics | obesity | public health | Network mathematics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129079/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

5.95J Teaching College-Level Science (MIT) 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary for teaching science and engineering in higher education. Topics include: using current research in student learning to improve teaching; developing courses; lecturing; promoting students' ability to think critically and solve problems; communicating with a diverse student body; using educational technology; creating effective assignments and tests; and utilizing feedback to improve instruction. Students research and teach a topic of particular interest. This subject is appropriate for both novices and those with teaching experience. This seminar focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary for teaching science and engineering in higher education. Topics include: using current research in student learning to improve teaching; developing courses; lecturing; promoting students' ability to think critically and solve problems; communicating with a diverse student body; using educational technology; creating effective assignments and tests; and utilizing feedback to improve instruction. Students research and teach a topic of particular interest. This subject is appropriate for both novices and those with teaching experience.

Subjects

teaching skills | teaching skills | learning objectives | learning objectives | lecturing | lecturing | active learning | active learning | feedback | feedback | interactive lessons | interactive lessons | pedagogy | pedagogy | student learning | student learning | educational technology | educational technology | STEM (science | STEM (science | technology | technology | engineering | engineering | and mathematics) | and mathematics) | teaching philosophy statement | teaching philosophy statement | 5.95 | 5.95 | 7.59 | 7.59 | 8.395 | 8.395 | 18.094 | 18.094

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.021J Introduction to Modeling and Simulation (MIT) 3.021J Introduction to Modeling and Simulation (MIT)

Description

This course explores the basic concepts of computer modeling and simulation in science and engineering. We'll use techniques and software for simulation, data analysis and visualization. Continuum, mesoscale, atomistic and quantum methods are used to study fundamental and applied problems in physics, chemistry, materials science, mechanics, engineering, and biology. Examples drawn from the disciplines above are used to understand or characterize complex structures and materials, and complement experimental observations. This course explores the basic concepts of computer modeling and simulation in science and engineering. We'll use techniques and software for simulation, data analysis and visualization. Continuum, mesoscale, atomistic and quantum methods are used to study fundamental and applied problems in physics, chemistry, materials science, mechanics, engineering, and biology. Examples drawn from the disciplines above are used to understand or characterize complex structures and materials, and complement experimental observations.

Subjects

computer modeling | computer modeling | discrete particle system | discrete particle system | continuum | continuum | continuum field | continuum field | statistical sampling | statistical sampling | data analysis | data analysis | visualization | visualization | quantum | quantum | quantum method | quantum method | chemical | chemical | molecular dynamics | molecular dynamics | Monte Carlo | Monte Carlo | mesoscale | mesoscale | continuum method | continuum method | computational physics | computational physics | chemistry | chemistry | mechanics | mechanics | materials science | materials science | biology | biology | applied mathematics | applied mathematics | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | heat | heat | fractal | fractal | evolution | evolution | melting | melting | gas | gas | structural mechanics | structural mechanics | FEM | FEM | finite element | finite element

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries (MIT) 21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries (MIT)

Description

Has there ever been an "Age of Reason?" In the western tradition, one might make claims for various moments during Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. In this class, however, we will focus on the two and a half centuries between 1600 and 1850, a period when insights first developed in the natural sciences and mathematics were seized upon by social theorists, institutional reformers and political revolutionaries who sought to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Through the study of trials, art, literature, theater, music, politics, and culture more generally, we will consider evolution and revolution in these two and a half centuries. We will also attend to those who opposed change on both traditional and radical grounds. Has there ever been an "Age of Reason?" In the western tradition, one might make claims for various moments during Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. In this class, however, we will focus on the two and a half centuries between 1600 and 1850, a period when insights first developed in the natural sciences and mathematics were seized upon by social theorists, institutional reformers and political revolutionaries who sought to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Through the study of trials, art, literature, theater, music, politics, and culture more generally, we will consider evolution and revolution in these two and a half centuries. We will also attend to those who opposed change on both traditional and radical grounds.

Subjects

Age of Reason | Age of Reason | philosophy | philosophy | cultural history | cultural history | intellectual history | intellectual history | History | History | western tradition | western tradition | Antiquity | Antiquity | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | Renaissance | Renaissance | 1600 | 1600 | 1850 | 1850 | natural sciences | natural sciences | mathematics | mathematics | social theorists | social theorists | institutional reformers | institutional reformers | political revolutionaries | political revolutionaries | change | change | themselves | themselves | society | society | trials | trials | art | art | literature | literature | theater | theater | music | music | politics | politics | culture | culture | evolution | evolution | revolution. | revolution.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.042J Mathematics for Computer Science (SMA 5512) (MIT) 6.042J Mathematics for Computer Science (SMA 5512) (MIT)

Description

This is an introductory course in Discrete Mathematics oriented toward Computer Science and Engineering. The course divides roughly into thirds: Fundamental concepts of Mathematics: definitions, proofs, sets, functions, relations. Discrete structures: modular arithmetic, graphs, state machines, counting. Discrete probability theory. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5512 (Mathematics for Computer Science). Contributors Srinivas Devadas Lars Engebretsen David Karger Eric Lehman Thomson Leighton Charles Leiserson Nancy Lynch Santosh Vempala This is an introductory course in Discrete Mathematics oriented toward Computer Science and Engineering. The course divides roughly into thirds: Fundamental concepts of Mathematics: definitions, proofs, sets, functions, relations. Discrete structures: modular arithmetic, graphs, state machines, counting. Discrete probability theory. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5512 (Mathematics for Computer Science). Contributors Srinivas Devadas Lars Engebretsen David Karger Eric Lehman Thomson Leighton Charles Leiserson Nancy Lynch Santosh Vempala

Subjects

discrete mathematics | discrete mathematics | computer science | computer science | definitions | definitions | proofs | proofs | sets | sets | functions | functions | relations | relations | discrete structures | discrete structures | modular arithmetic | modular arithmetic | graphs | graphs | state machines | state machines | counting | counting | discrete probability theory | discrete probability theory | probability | probability | 6.042 | 6.042 | 18.062 | 18.062

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.251J Introduction to Mathematical Programming (MIT) 6.251J Introduction to Mathematical Programming (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to optimization problems, algorithms, and their complexity, emphasizing basic methodologies and the underlying mathematical structures. The main topics covered include: Theory and algorithms for linear programming Network flow problems and algorithms Introduction to integer programming and combinatorial problems This course offers an introduction to optimization problems, algorithms, and their complexity, emphasizing basic methodologies and the underlying mathematical structures. The main topics covered include: Theory and algorithms for linear programming Network flow problems and algorithms Introduction to integer programming and combinatorial problems

Subjects

optimization | optimization | algorithms | algorithms | linear programming | linear programming | network flow problems | network flow problems | integer programming | integer programming | combinatorial problems | combinatorial problems | mathematics | mathematics | mathematical programming | mathematical programming | 6.251 | 6.251 | 15.081 | 15.081

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

SP.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT) SP.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry. Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Subjects

mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | Greek philosophy | Greek philosophy | Plato | Plato | Euclid | Euclid | Aristotle | Aristotle | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Nicomachus | Nicomachus | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT) 21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT)

Description

This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Rembrandt and Moliere. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Rembrandt and Moliere. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing.

Subjects

history | history | art and science | art and science | art vs. science | art vs. science | history of science | history of science | religion | religion | natural philosophy | natural philosophy | mathematics | mathematics | literature | literature | cosmology | cosmology | physics | physics | astronomy | astronomy | alchemy | alchemy | chemistry | chemistry | plays | plays | theater history | theater history | cultural studies | cultural studies | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Ford | Ford | Tate | Tate | Behn | Behn | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | Burton | Burton | Hobbes | Hobbes | Boyle | Boyle | 17th century | 17th century | England | England | english history | english history | Charles I | Charles I | Charles II | Charles II | Cromwell | Cromwell

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

12.540 Principles of the Global Positioning System (MIT) 12.540 Principles of the Global Positioning System (MIT)

Description

The aim of this course is to introduce the principles of the Global Positioning System and to demonstrate its application to various aspects of Earth Sciences. The specific content of the course depends each year on the interests of the students in the class. In some cases, the class interests are towards the geophysical applications of GPS and we concentrate on high precision(millimeter level) positioning on regional and global scales. In other cases, the interests have been more toward engineering applications of kinematic positioning with GPS in which case the concentration is on positioning with slightly less accuracy but being able to do so for a moving object. In all cases, we concentrate on the fundamen The aim of this course is to introduce the principles of the Global Positioning System and to demonstrate its application to various aspects of Earth Sciences. The specific content of the course depends each year on the interests of the students in the class. In some cases, the class interests are towards the geophysical applications of GPS and we concentrate on high precision(millimeter level) positioning on regional and global scales. In other cases, the interests have been more toward engineering applications of kinematic positioning with GPS in which case the concentration is on positioning with slightly less accuracy but being able to do so for a moving object. In all cases, we concentrate on the fundamen

Subjects

Global Positioning System | Global Positioning System | Earth Sciences | Earth Sciences | geophysical applications | geophysical applications | GPS | GPS | engineering applications | engineering applications | kinematic positioning | kinematic positioning | precision | precision | accuracy | accuracy | moving objects | moving objects | coordinate | coordinate | time | time | systems | systems | satellite | satellite | geodetic | geodetic | orbital | orbital | motions | motions | pseudo ranges | pseudo ranges | carrier phases | carrier phases | stochastic | stochastic | mathematics | mathematics | models | models | data | data | analysis | analysis | estimation | estimation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

12.215 Modern Navigation (MIT) 12.215 Modern Navigation (MIT)

Description

The development of the Global Positioning System (GPS) started in the 1960s, and the system became operational in 1992. The system has seen many diverse applications develop in the last few years with the accuracy of positioning ranging from 100 meters (the civilian restricted accuracy requirement) to 1 millimeter (without the need for a security clearance!) In this course we will apply many of basic principles of science and mathematics learnt at MIT to explore the applications and principles of GPS. We also use GPS and other equipment in the class (and outside on Campus) to demonstrate the uses of this system.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .f files found on this course site. Please refer to the The development of the Global Positioning System (GPS) started in the 1960s, and the system became operational in 1992. The system has seen many diverse applications develop in the last few years with the accuracy of positioning ranging from 100 meters (the civilian restricted accuracy requirement) to 1 millimeter (without the need for a security clearance!) In this course we will apply many of basic principles of science and mathematics learnt at MIT to explore the applications and principles of GPS. We also use GPS and other equipment in the class (and outside on Campus) to demonstrate the uses of this system.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .f files found on this course site. Please refer to the

Subjects

Global Positioning | Global Positioning | Global Positioning System | Global Positioning System | GPScivilian restricted accuracy requirment | GPScivilian restricted accuracy requirment | basic principles | basic principles | science | science | mathematics | mathematics | GPS | GPS | navigation | navigation | accuracy | accuracy | civilian | civilian | application | application | coordinate systems | coordinate systems | lattitude | lattitude | longitude | longitude | deformable | deformable | Earth | Earth | estimation | estimation | aircraft | aircraft | stochastic | stochastic | mathematical | mathematical | models | models | statistics | statistics | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | pseudorange | pseudorange | phase measurements | phase measurements | celestial | celestial | sattelite | sattelite | astronomical observations | astronomical observations | radio | radio | ship | ship | automobile | automobile

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.310 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.310 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Principles of Applied Mathematics is a study of illustrative topics in discrete applied mathematics including sorting algorithms, information theory, coding theory, secret codes, generating functions, linear programming, game theory. There is an emphasis on topics that have direct application in the real world. Principles of Applied Mathematics is a study of illustrative topics in discrete applied mathematics including sorting algorithms, information theory, coding theory, secret codes, generating functions, linear programming, game theory. There is an emphasis on topics that have direct application in the real world.

Subjects

sorting algorithms | sorting algorithms | information theory | information theory | coding theory | coding theory | secret codes | secret codes | generating functions | generating functions | linear programming | linear programming | game theory | game theory | discrete applied mathematics | discrete applied mathematics | mathematical analysis | mathematical analysis | sorting data | sorting data | efficient data storage | efficient data storage | efficient data transmission | efficient data transmission | error correction | error correction | secrecy | secrecy | Fast Fourier Transform | Fast Fourier Transform | network-flow problems | network-flow problems | mathematical economics | mathematical economics | statistics | statistics | probability theory | probability theory | combinatorics | combinatorics | linear algebra | linear algebra

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers (MIT) 3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers (MIT)

Description

The class will cover mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials. The class uses examples from 3.012 to introduce mathematical concepts and materials-related problem solving skills. Topics include linear algebra and orthonormal basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, tensor operations, symmetry operations, calculus of several variables, introduction to complex analysis, ordinary and partial differential equations, theory of distributions, fourier analysis and random walks.Technical RequirementsMathematica® software is required to run the .nb files found on this course site. The class will cover mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials. The class uses examples from 3.012 to introduce mathematical concepts and materials-related problem solving skills. Topics include linear algebra and orthonormal basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, tensor operations, symmetry operations, calculus of several variables, introduction to complex analysis, ordinary and partial differential equations, theory of distributions, fourier analysis and random walks.Technical RequirementsMathematica® software is required to run the .nb files found on this course site.

Subjects

energetics | energetics | materials structure and symmetry: applied fields | materials structure and symmetry: applied fields | mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials | mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials | linear algebra | linear algebra | orthonormal basis | orthonormal basis | eigenvalues | eigenvalues | eigenvectors | eigenvectors | quadratic forms | quadratic forms | tensor operations | tensor operations | symmetry operations | symmetry operations | calculus | calculus | complex analysis | complex analysis | differential equations | differential equations | theory of distributions | theory of distributions | fourier analysis | fourier analysis | random walks | random walks | mathematical technicques | mathematical technicques | materials science | materials science | materials engineering | materials engineering | materials structure | materials structure | symmetry | symmetry | applied fields | applied fields | materials response | materials response | solids mechanics | solids mechanics | solids physics | solids physics | soft materials | soft materials | multi-variable calculus | multi-variable calculus | ordinary differential equations | ordinary differential equations | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | applied mathematics | applied mathematics | mathematical techniques | mathematical techniques

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Lewis Carroll in Numberland

Description

An intriguing biographical exploration of Lewis Carroll, focusing on the author's mathematical career and influences. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

alice in wonderland | looking glass | alice | maths | Lewis Carroll | wonderland | mathematics | numberland | alice in wonderland | looking glass | alice | maths | Lewis Carroll | wonderland | mathematics | numberland | 2009-09-26

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129169/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Lewis Carroll in Numberland

Description

An intriguing biographical exploration of Lewis Carroll, focusing on the author's mathematical career and influences. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

alice in wonderland | looking glass | alice | maths | Lewis Carroll | wonderland | mathematics | numberland | alice in wonderland | looking glass | alice | maths | Lewis Carroll | wonderland | mathematics | numberland | 2009-09-26

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129169/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Work of Music: Music and Mathematics

Description

A talk given at Wolfson College as part of a lecture series entitled "The Work of Music". Timothy Gowers is a Royal Society Research Professor at the Centre For Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, UK. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

mathematics | wolfson | music | mathematics | wolfson | music | 2011-05-12

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129040/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata