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15.082J Network Optimization (MIT) 15.082J Network Optimization (MIT)

Description

15.082J/6.855J is an H-level graduate subject in the theory and practice of network flows and its extensions. Network flow problems form a subclass of linear programming problems with applications to transportation, logistics, manufacturing, computer science, project management, finance as well as a number of other domains. This subject will survey some of the applications of network flows and focus on key special cases of network flow problems including the following: the shortest path problem, the maximum flow problem, the minimum cost flow problem, and the multi-commodity flow problem. 15.082J/6.855J is an H-level graduate subject in the theory and practice of network flows and its extensions. Network flow problems form a subclass of linear programming problems with applications to transportation, logistics, manufacturing, computer science, project management, finance as well as a number of other domains. This subject will survey some of the applications of network flows and focus on key special cases of network flow problems including the following: the shortest path problem, the maximum flow problem, the minimum cost flow problem, and the multi-commodity flow problem.

Subjects

network flows | network flows | extensions | extensions | network flow problems | network flow problems | transportation | transportation | logistics | logistics | manufacturing | manufacturing | computer science | computer science | project management | project management | finance | finance | the shortest path problem | the shortest path problem | the maximum flow problem | the maximum flow problem | the minimum cost flow problem | the minimum cost flow problem | the multi-commodity flow problem | the multi-commodity flow problem | communication | communication | systems | systems | applications | applications | efficiency | efficiency | algorithms | algorithms | traffic | traffic | equilibrium | equilibrium | design | design | mplementation | mplementation | linear programming | linear programming | implementation | implementation | computer | computer | science | science | linear | linear | programming | programming | network | network | flow | flow | problems | problems | project | project | management | management | maximum | maximum | minimum | minimum | cost | cost | multi-commodity | multi-commodity | shortest | shortest | path | path | 15.082 | 15.082 | 6.855 | 6.855

License

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6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT) 6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT)

Description

6.050J / 2.110J presents the unified theory of information with applications to computing, communications, thermodynamics, and other sciences. It covers digital signals and streams, codes, compression, noise, and probability, reversible and irreversible operations, information in biological systems, channel capacity, maximum-entropy formalism, thermodynamic equilibrium, temperature, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, and quantum computation. Designed for MIT freshmen as an elective, this course has been jointly developed by MIT's Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering. There is no known course similar to 6.050J / 2.110J offered at any other university.  6.050J / 2.110J presents the unified theory of information with applications to computing, communications, thermodynamics, and other sciences. It covers digital signals and streams, codes, compression, noise, and probability, reversible and irreversible operations, information in biological systems, channel capacity, maximum-entropy formalism, thermodynamic equilibrium, temperature, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, and quantum computation. Designed for MIT freshmen as an elective, this course has been jointly developed by MIT's Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering. There is no known course similar to 6.050J / 2.110J offered at any other university. 

Subjects

information and entropy | information and entropy | computing | computing | communications | communications | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | digital signals and streams | digital signals and streams | codes | codes | compression | compression | noise | noise | probability | probability | reversible operations | reversible operations | irreversible operations | irreversible operations | information in biological systems | information in biological systems | channel capacity | channel capacity | aximum-entropy formalism | aximum-entropy formalism | thermodynamic equilibrium | thermodynamic equilibrium | temperature | temperature | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | maximum-entropy formalism | maximum-entropy formalism | second law of thermodynamics | second law of thermodynamics | quantum computation | quantum computation | biological systems | biological systems | unified theory of information | unified theory of information | digital signals | digital signals | digital streams | digital streams | bits | bits | errors | errors | processes | processes | inference | inference | maximum entropy | maximum entropy | physical systems | physical systems | energy | energy | quantum information | quantum information | 6.050 | 6.050 | 2.110 | 2.110

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2.160 Identification, Estimation, and Learning (MIT) 2.160 Identification, Estimation, and Learning (MIT)

Description

This course provides a broad theoretical basis for system identification, estimation, and learning. Students will study least squares estimation and its convergence properties, Kalman filters, noise dynamics and system representation, function approximation theory, neural nets, radial basis functions, wavelets, Volterra expansions, informative data sets, persistent excitation, asymptotic variance, central limit theorems, model structure selection, system order estimate, maximum likelihood, unbiased estimates, Cramer-Rao lower bound, Kullback-Leibler information distance, Akaike's information criterion, experiment design, and model validation. This course provides a broad theoretical basis for system identification, estimation, and learning. Students will study least squares estimation and its convergence properties, Kalman filters, noise dynamics and system representation, function approximation theory, neural nets, radial basis functions, wavelets, Volterra expansions, informative data sets, persistent excitation, asymptotic variance, central limit theorems, model structure selection, system order estimate, maximum likelihood, unbiased estimates, Cramer-Rao lower bound, Kullback-Leibler information distance, Akaike's information criterion, experiment design, and model validation.

Subjects

system identification; estimation; least squares estimation; Kalman filter; noise dynamics; system representation; function approximation theory; neural nets; radial basis functions; wavelets; volterra expansions; informative data sets; persistent excitation; asymptotic variance; central limit theorem; model structure selection; system order estimate; maximum likelihood; unbiased estimates; Cramer-Rao lower bound; Kullback-Leibler information distance; Akaike?s information criterion; experiment design; model validation. | system identification; estimation; least squares estimation; Kalman filter; noise dynamics; system representation; function approximation theory; neural nets; radial basis functions; wavelets; volterra expansions; informative data sets; persistent excitation; asymptotic variance; central limit theorem; model structure selection; system order estimate; maximum likelihood; unbiased estimates; Cramer-Rao lower bound; Kullback-Leibler information distance; Akaike?s information criterion; experiment design; model validation. | system identification | system identification | estimation | estimation | least squares estimation | least squares estimation | Kalman filter | Kalman filter | noise dynamics | noise dynamics | system representation | system representation | function approximation theory | function approximation theory | neural nets | neural nets | radial basis functions | radial basis functions | wavelets | wavelets | volterra expansions | volterra expansions | informative data sets | informative data sets | persistent excitation | persistent excitation | asymptotic variance | asymptotic variance | central limit theorem | central limit theorem | model structure selection | model structure selection | system order estimate | system order estimate | maximum likelihood | maximum likelihood | unbiased estimates | unbiased estimates | Cramer-Rao lower bound | Cramer-Rao lower bound | Kullback-Leibler information distance | Kullback-Leibler information distance | Akaike?s information criterion | Akaike?s information criterion | experiment design | experiment design | model validation | model validation

License

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14.451 Dynamic Optimization Methods with Applications (MIT) 14.451 Dynamic Optimization Methods with Applications (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on dynamic optimization methods, both in discrete and in continuous time. We approach these problems from a dynamic programming and optimal control perspective. We also study the dynamic systems that come from the solutions to these problems. The course will illustrate how these techniques are useful in various applications, drawing on many economic examples. However, the focus will remain on gaining a general command of the tools so that they can be applied later in other classes. This course focuses on dynamic optimization methods, both in discrete and in continuous time. We approach these problems from a dynamic programming and optimal control perspective. We also study the dynamic systems that come from the solutions to these problems. The course will illustrate how these techniques are useful in various applications, drawing on many economic examples. However, the focus will remain on gaining a general command of the tools so that they can be applied later in other classes.

Subjects

vector spaces | vector spaces | principle of optimality | principle of optimality | concavity of the value function | concavity of the value function | differentiability of the value function | differentiability of the value function | Euler equations | Euler equations | deterministic dynamics | deterministic dynamics | models with constant returns to scale | models with constant returns to scale | nonstationary models | nonstationary models | stochastic dynamic programming | stochastic dynamic programming | stochastic Euler equations | stochastic Euler equations | stochastic dynamics | stochastic dynamics | calculus of variations | calculus of variations | the maximum principle | the maximum principle | discounted infinite-horizon optimal control | discounted infinite-horizon optimal control | saddle-path stability | saddle-path stability

License

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered. This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | demand theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | competitive markets | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | externalities | externalities | Afriat's theorem | Afriat's theorem | pricing | pricing | robust comparative statics | robust comparative statics | utility theory | utility theory | properties of preferences | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | choice as primitive | revealed preference | revealed preference | classical demand theory | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | integrability | demand aggregation | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | and demand estimation | increasing differences | increasing differences | producer theory applications | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | simple models of externalities | government intervention | government intervention | Coase theorem | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | uncertainty | common property externalities | common property externalities | optimization | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | Microfoundations | core | core | core convergence | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | marriage markets | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | existence of stable matchings | incentives | incentives | housing markets core mechanism | housing markets core mechanism

License

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15.082J Network Optimization (MIT)

Description

15.082J/6.855J is an H-level graduate subject in the theory and practice of network flows and its extensions. Network flow problems form a subclass of linear programming problems with applications to transportation, logistics, manufacturing, computer science, project management, finance as well as a number of other domains. This subject will survey some of the applications of network flows and focus on key special cases of network flow problems including the following: the shortest path problem, the maximum flow problem, the minimum cost flow problem, and the multi-commodity flow problem.

Subjects

network flows | extensions | network flow problems | transportation | logistics | manufacturing | computer science | project management | finance | the shortest path problem | the maximum flow problem | the minimum cost flow problem | the multi-commodity flow problem | communication | systems | applications | efficiency | algorithms | traffic | equilibrium | design | mplementation | linear programming | implementation | computer | science | linear | programming | network | flow | problems | project | management | maximum | minimum | cost | multi-commodity | shortest | path | 15.082 | 6.855

License

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6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT) 6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course explores the ultimate limits to communication and computation, with an emphasis on the physical nature of information and information processing. Topics include: information and computation, digital signals, codes and compression, applications such as biological representations of information, logic circuits, computer architectures, and algorithmic information, noise, probability, error correction, reversible and irreversible operations, physics of computation, and quantum computation. The concept of entropy applied to channel capacity and to the second law of thermodynamics. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course explores the ultimate limits to communication and computation, with an emphasis on the physical nature of information and information processing. Topics include: information and computation, digital signals, codes and compression, applications such as biological representations of information, logic circuits, computer architectures, and algorithmic information, noise, probability, error correction, reversible and irreversible operations, physics of computation, and quantum computation. The concept of entropy applied to channel capacity and to the second law of thermodynamics.

Subjects

information and entropy | information and entropy | computing | computing | communications | communications | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | digital signals and streams | digital signals and streams | codes | codes | compression | compression | noise | noise | probability | probability | reversible operations | reversible operations | irreversible operations | irreversible operations | information in biological systems | information in biological systems | channel capacity | channel capacity | maximum-entropy formalism | maximum-entropy formalism | thermodynamic equilibrium | thermodynamic equilibrium | temperature | temperature | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation

License

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2.160 Identification, Estimation, and Learning (MIT)

Description

This course provides a broad theoretical basis for system identification, estimation, and learning. Students will study least squares estimation and its convergence properties, Kalman filters, noise dynamics and system representation, function approximation theory, neural nets, radial basis functions, wavelets, Volterra expansions, informative data sets, persistent excitation, asymptotic variance, central limit theorems, model structure selection, system order estimate, maximum likelihood, unbiased estimates, Cramer-Rao lower bound, Kullback-Leibler information distance, Akaike's information criterion, experiment design, and model validation.

Subjects

system identification; estimation; least squares estimation; Kalman filter; noise dynamics; system representation; function approximation theory; neural nets; radial basis functions; wavelets; volterra expansions; informative data sets; persistent excitation; asymptotic variance; central limit theorem; model structure selection; system order estimate; maximum likelihood; unbiased estimates; Cramer-Rao lower bound; Kullback-Leibler information distance; Akaike?s information criterion; experiment design; model validation. | system identification | estimation | least squares estimation | Kalman filter | noise dynamics | system representation | function approximation theory | neural nets | radial basis functions | wavelets | volterra expansions | informative data sets | persistent excitation | asymptotic variance | central limit theorem | model structure selection | system order estimate | maximum likelihood | unbiased estimates | Cramer-Rao lower bound | Kullback-Leibler information distance | Akaike?s information criterion | experiment design | model validation

License

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18.310 Principles of Discrete Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.310 Principles of Discrete Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to discrete applied mathematics. Topics include probability, counting, linear programming, number-theoretic algorithms, sorting, data compression, and error-correcting codes. This is a Communication Intensive in the Major (CI-M) course, and thus includes a writing component. This course is an introduction to discrete applied mathematics. Topics include probability, counting, linear programming, number-theoretic algorithms, sorting, data compression, and error-correcting codes. This is a Communication Intensive in the Major (CI-M) course, and thus includes a writing component.

Subjects

probability | probability | probability theory counting | probability theory counting | pigeonhole principle | pigeonhole principle | Van der Waerden's theorem | Van der Waerden's theorem | Chernoff bounds | Chernoff bounds | counting | counting | coding | coding | sampling | sampling | random sampling | random sampling | Catalan families | Catalan families | generating functions | generating functions | chord diagrams | chord diagrams | linear programming | linear programming | simplex method | simplex method | Zero-Sum matrix | Zero-Sum matrix | network flows | network flows | maximum flow problem | maximum flow problem | sorting algorithms | sorting algorithms | QUICKSORT | QUICKSORT | median finding | median finding | sorting networks | sorting networks | Batcher's algorithm | Batcher's algorithm | Euclid's algorithm | Euclid's algorithm | Chinese Remainder Theorem | Chinese Remainder Theorem | cryptography | cryptography | RSA code | RSA code | primaility testing | primaility testing | FFT | FFT | Fast Fourier Transform | Fast Fourier Transform | Shannon's coding theorems | Shannon's coding theorems | Lempel-Ziv codes | Lempel-Ziv codes | linear codes | linear codes | hamming code | hamming code

License

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14.385 Nonlinear Econometric Analysis (MIT) 14.385 Nonlinear Econometric Analysis (MIT)

Description

This course presents micro-econometric models, including large sample theory for estimation and hypothesis testing, generalized method of moments (GMM), estimation of censored and truncated specifications, quantile regression, structural estimation, nonparametric and semiparametric estimation, treatment effects, panel data, bootstrapping, simulation methods, and Bayesian methods. The methods are illustrated with economic applications. This course presents micro-econometric models, including large sample theory for estimation and hypothesis testing, generalized method of moments (GMM), estimation of censored and truncated specifications, quantile regression, structural estimation, nonparametric and semiparametric estimation, treatment effects, panel data, bootstrapping, simulation methods, and Bayesian methods. The methods are illustrated with economic applications.

Subjects

nonlinear | nonlinear | econometric | econometric | analysis | analysis | generalized method of moments | generalized method of moments | GMM | GMM | maximum likelihood estimation | maximum likelihood estimation | MLE | MLE | minimum distance | minimum distance | extremum | extremum | large sample theory | large sample theory | asymptotic theory | asymptotic theory | discrete choice | discrete choice | censoring | censoring | sample selection | sample selection | bootstrap | bootstrap | subsampling | subsampling | finite-sample methods | finite-sample methods | quantile regression | quantile regression | QR | QR | distributional methods | distributional methods | Bayesian methods | Bayesian methods | quasi-Bayesian methods | quasi-Bayesian methods | bounds | bounds | partial identification | partial identification | weak instruments | weak instruments | many instruments | many instruments | instrumental variables | instrumental variables | nonparametric estimation | nonparametric estimation | semiparametric estimation | semiparametric estimation | treatment effects | treatment effects | nonlinear models | nonlinear models | panel data | panel data | economic modeling | economic modeling

License

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Analysis (MIT) Analysis (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of characterizing and recognizing patterns and features of interest in numerical data. Basic tools and theory for signal understanding problems with applications to user modeling, affect recognition, speech recognition and understanding, computer vision, physiological analysis, and more. Decision theory, statistical classification, maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation, non-parametric methods, unsupervised learning and clustering. Additional topics on machine and human learning from active research. Fundamentals of characterizing and recognizing patterns and features of interest in numerical data. Basic tools and theory for signal understanding problems with applications to user modeling, affect recognition, speech recognition and understanding, computer vision, physiological analysis, and more. Decision theory, statistical classification, maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation, non-parametric methods, unsupervised learning and clustering. Additional topics on machine and human learning from active research.

Subjects

machine and human learning | machine and human learning | unsupervised learning and clustering | unsupervised learning and clustering | non-parametric methods | non-parametric methods | Bayesian estimation | Bayesian estimation | maximum likelihood | maximum likelihood | statistical classification | statistical classification | decision theory | decision theory | physiological analysis | physiological analysis | computer vision | computer vision | peech recognition and understanding | peech recognition and understanding | recognition | recognition | numerical data | numerical data | 1.126 | 1.126

License

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6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT)

Description

6.050J / 2.110J presents the unified theory of information with applications to computing, communications, thermodynamics, and other sciences. It covers digital signals and streams, codes, compression, noise, and probability, reversible and irreversible operations, information in biological systems, channel capacity, maximum-entropy formalism, thermodynamic equilibrium, temperature, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, and quantum computation. Designed for MIT freshmen as an elective, this course has been jointly developed by MIT's Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering. There is no known course similar to 6.050J / 2.110J offered at any other university. 

Subjects

information and entropy | computing | communications | thermodynamics | digital signals and streams | codes | compression | noise | probability | reversible operations | irreversible operations | information in biological systems | channel capacity | aximum-entropy formalism | thermodynamic equilibrium | temperature | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | maximum-entropy formalism | second law of thermodynamics | quantum computation | biological systems | unified theory of information | digital signals | digital streams | bits | errors | processes | inference | maximum entropy | physical systems | energy | quantum information | 6.050 | 2.110

License

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15.082J Network Optimization (MIT) 15.082J Network Optimization (MIT)

Description

15.082J/6.855J/ESD.78J is a graduate subject in the theory and practice of network flows and its extensions. Network flow problems form a subclass of linear programming problems with applications to transportation, logistics, manufacturing, computer science, project management, and finance, as well as a number of other domains. This subject will survey some of the applications of network flows and focus on key special cases of network flow problems including the following: the shortest path problem, the maximum flow problem, the minimum cost flow problem, and the multi-commodity flow problem. We will also consider other extensions of network flow problems. 15.082J/6.855J/ESD.78J is a graduate subject in the theory and practice of network flows and its extensions. Network flow problems form a subclass of linear programming problems with applications to transportation, logistics, manufacturing, computer science, project management, and finance, as well as a number of other domains. This subject will survey some of the applications of network flows and focus on key special cases of network flow problems including the following: the shortest path problem, the maximum flow problem, the minimum cost flow problem, and the multi-commodity flow problem. We will also consider other extensions of network flow problems.

Subjects

15.082 | 15.082 | 6.855 | 6.855 | ESD.78 | ESD.78 | network models | network models | network design | network design | maximum flow algorithm | maximum flow algorithm | minimum cost flow | minimum cost flow | shortest path algorithm | shortest path algorithm | algorithm efficiency | algorithm efficiency | preflow push algorithm | preflow push algorithm | data structures | data structures

License

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6.854J Advanced Algorithms (MIT) 6.854J Advanced Algorithms (MIT)

Description

6.854J is a first-year graduate course in algorithms, continuing where 6.046J left off. The course emphasizes fundamental algorithms and advanced methods of algorithmic design, analysis, and implementation. Topics include: data structures, network flows, linear programming, computational geometry, approximation algorithms. 6.854J is a first-year graduate course in algorithms, continuing where 6.046J left off. The course emphasizes fundamental algorithms and advanced methods of algorithmic design, analysis, and implementation. Topics include: data structures, network flows, linear programming, computational geometry, approximation algorithms.

Subjects

algorithm design and analysis | algorithm design and analysis | algorithms | algorithms | fundamental algorithms | fundamental algorithms | advanced methods of algorithmic design | advanced methods of algorithmic design | analysis | analysis | implementation | implementation | data structures | data structures | network flows | network flows | linear programming | linear programming | computational geometry | computational geometry | approximation algorithms | approximation algorithms | algorithmic design | algorithmic design | algorithmic analysis | algorithmic analysis | string algorithms | string algorithms | maximum flows | maximum flows | online algorithms | online algorithms | scheduling | scheduling | external memory algorithms | external memory algorithms | 6.854 | 6.854 | 18.415 | 18.415

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6.435 System Identification (MIT) 6.435 System Identification (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduates and includes topics such as mathematical models of systems from observations of their behavior; time series, state-space, and input-output models; model structures, parametrization, and identifiability; non-parametric methods; prediction error methods for parameter estimation, convergence, consistency, and asymptotic distribution; relations to maximum likelihood estimation; recursive estimation; relation to Kalman filters; structure determination; order estimation; Akaike criterion; bounded but unknown noise model; and robustness and practical issues. This course is offered to graduates and includes topics such as mathematical models of systems from observations of their behavior; time series, state-space, and input-output models; model structures, parametrization, and identifiability; non-parametric methods; prediction error methods for parameter estimation, convergence, consistency, and asymptotic distribution; relations to maximum likelihood estimation; recursive estimation; relation to Kalman filters; structure determination; order estimation; Akaike criterion; bounded but unknown noise model; and robustness and practical issues.

Subjects

mathematical models | mathematical models | time series | time series | state-space | state-space | input-output models | input-output models | model structures | model structures | parametrization | parametrization | identifiability | identifiability | non-parametric methods | non-parametric methods | prediction error | prediction error | parameter estimation | parameter estimation | convergence | convergence | consistency | consistency | andasymptotic distribution | andasymptotic distribution | maximum likelihood estimation | maximum likelihood estimation | recursive estimation | recursive estimation | Kalman filters | Kalman filters | structure determination | structure determination | order estimation | order estimation | Akaike criterion | Akaike criterion | bounded noise models | bounded noise models | robustness | robustness

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.441 Statistical Inference (MIT) 18.441 Statistical Inference (MIT)

Description

Reviews probability and introduces statistical inference. Point and interval estimation. The maximum likelihood method. Hypothesis testing. Likelihood-ratio tests and Bayesian methods. Nonparametric methods. Analysis of variance, regression analysis and correlation. Chi-square goodness of fit tests. More theoretical than 18.443 (Statistics for Applications) and more detailed in its treatment of statistics than 18.05 (Introduction to Probability and Statistics). Reviews probability and introduces statistical inference. Point and interval estimation. The maximum likelihood method. Hypothesis testing. Likelihood-ratio tests and Bayesian methods. Nonparametric methods. Analysis of variance, regression analysis and correlation. Chi-square goodness of fit tests. More theoretical than 18.443 (Statistics for Applications) and more detailed in its treatment of statistics than 18.05 (Introduction to Probability and Statistics).

Subjects

probability | probability | statistical inference | statistical inference | Point and interval estimation | Point and interval estimation | The maximum likelihood method | The maximum likelihood method | Hypothesis testing | Hypothesis testing | Likelihood-ratio tests | Likelihood-ratio tests | Bayesian methods | Bayesian methods | Nonparametric methods | Nonparametric methods | Analysis of variance | Analysis of variance | regression analysis | regression analysis | correlation | correlation | Chi-square goodness of fit tests | Chi-square goodness of fit tests | Likelihood-ratio tests and Bayesian methods | Likelihood-ratio tests and Bayesian methods | regression analysis and correlation | regression analysis and correlation | probability | statistical inference | probability | statistical inference | Analysis of variance | regression analysis and correlation | Analysis of variance | regression analysis and correlation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.451 Dynamic Optimization Methods with Applications (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on dynamic optimization methods, both in discrete and in continuous time. We approach these problems from a dynamic programming and optimal control perspective. We also study the dynamic systems that come from the solutions to these problems. The course will illustrate how these techniques are useful in various applications, drawing on many economic examples. However, the focus will remain on gaining a general command of the tools so that they can be applied later in other classes.

Subjects

vector spaces | principle of optimality | concavity of the value function | differentiability of the value function | Euler equations | deterministic dynamics | models with constant returns to scale | nonstationary models | stochastic dynamic programming | stochastic Euler equations | stochastic dynamics | calculus of variations | the maximum principle | discounted infinite-horizon optimal control | saddle-path stability

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.385 Nonlinear Econometric Analysis (MIT)

Description

This course presents micro-econometric models, including large sample theory for estimation and hypothesis testing, generalized method of moments (GMM), estimation of censored and truncated specifications, quantile regression, structural estimation, nonparametric and semiparametric estimation, treatment effects, panel data, bootstrapping, simulation methods, and Bayesian methods. The methods are illustrated with economic applications.

Subjects

nonlinear | econometric | analysis | generalized method of moments | GMM | maximum likelihood estimation | MLE | minimum distance | extremum | large sample theory | asymptotic theory | discrete choice | censoring | sample selection | bootstrap | subsampling | finite-sample methods | quantile regression | QR | distributional methods | Bayesian methods | quasi-Bayesian methods | bounds | partial identification | weak instruments | many instruments | instrumental variables | nonparametric estimation | semiparametric estimation | treatment effects | nonlinear models | panel data | economic modeling

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.310 Principles of Discrete Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to discrete applied mathematics. Topics include probability, counting, linear programming, number-theoretic algorithms, sorting, data compression, and error-correcting codes. This is a Communication Intensive in the Major (CI-M) course, and thus includes a writing component.

Subjects

probability | probability theory counting | pigeonhole principle | Van der Waerden's theorem | Chernoff bounds | counting | coding | sampling | random sampling | Catalan families | generating functions | chord diagrams | linear programming | simplex method | Zero-Sum matrix | network flows | maximum flow problem | sorting algorithms | QUICKSORT | median finding | sorting networks | Batcher's algorithm | Euclid's algorithm | Chinese Remainder Theorem | cryptography | RSA code | primaility testing | FFT | Fast Fourier Transform | Shannon's coding theorems | Lempel-Ziv codes | linear codes | hamming code

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | general equilibrium | externalities | Afriat's theorem | pricing | robust comparative statics | utility theory | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | revealed preference | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | increasing differences | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | government intervention | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | common property externalities | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | core | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | incentives | housing markets core mechanism

License

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TALAT Lecture 3300: Fundamentals of Metal Forming

Description

This lecture gives a brief review of the fundamental terms and laws governing metal forming at room temperature as well as at high temperatures. This lecture is a necessary prerequisite to understand the more specific treatment of metal forming subjects such as forging, impact extrusion and sheet metal forming in the subsequent TALAT This lectures 3400 to 3800. General background in production engineering, machine tools is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | eaa | talat | training in aluminium application technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | machining | forming | classification | state of stress | type of raw material | forming temperature | induction of forces | flow stress | plastic strain | logarithmic plastic strain | logarithmic strain in upsetting | law of volume constancy | plastic strain rate | plastic strain acceleration | plastic flow | maximum shear stress | von mises flow criterion | yield criteria for plane stress | yield locus | law of plastic flow | flow curves | room temperature | elevated temperatures | average flow stress | forming energy | heat development | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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18.441 Statistical Inference (MIT)

Description

Reviews probability and introduces statistical inference. Point and interval estimation. The maximum likelihood method. Hypothesis testing. Likelihood-ratio tests and Bayesian methods. Nonparametric methods. Analysis of variance, regression analysis and correlation. Chi-square goodness of fit tests. More theoretical than 18.443 (Statistics for Applications) and more detailed in its treatment of statistics than 18.05 (Introduction to Probability and Statistics).

Subjects

probability | statistical inference | Point and interval estimation | The maximum likelihood method | Hypothesis testing | Likelihood-ratio tests | Bayesian methods | Nonparametric methods | Analysis of variance | regression analysis | correlation | Chi-square goodness of fit tests | Likelihood-ratio tests and Bayesian methods | regression analysis and correlation | probability | statistical inference | Analysis of variance | regression analysis and correlation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.082J Network Optimization (MIT)

Description

15.082J/6.855J/ESD.78J is a graduate subject in the theory and practice of network flows and its extensions. Network flow problems form a subclass of linear programming problems with applications to transportation, logistics, manufacturing, computer science, project management, and finance, as well as a number of other domains. This subject will survey some of the applications of network flows and focus on key special cases of network flow problems including the following: the shortest path problem, the maximum flow problem, the minimum cost flow problem, and the multi-commodity flow problem. We will also consider other extensions of network flow problems.

Subjects

15.082 | 6.855 | ESD.78 | network models | network design | maximum flow algorithm | minimum cost flow | shortest path algorithm | algorithm efficiency | preflow push algorithm | data structures

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT)

Description

This course explores the ultimate limits to communication and computation, with an emphasis on the physical nature of information and information processing. Topics include: information and computation, digital signals, codes and compression, applications such as biological representations of information, logic circuits, computer architectures, and algorithmic information, noise, probability, error correction, reversible and irreversible operations, physics of computation, and quantum computation. The concept of entropy applied to channel capacity and to the second law of thermodynamics.

Subjects

information and entropy | computing | communications | thermodynamics | digital signals and streams | codes | compression | noise | probability | reversible operations | irreversible operations | information in biological systems | channel capacity | maximum-entropy formalism | thermodynamic equilibrium | temperature | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.435 System Identification (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduates and includes topics such as mathematical models of systems from observations of their behavior; time series, state-space, and input-output models; model structures, parametrization, and identifiability; non-parametric methods; prediction error methods for parameter estimation, convergence, consistency, and asymptotic distribution; relations to maximum likelihood estimation; recursive estimation; relation to Kalman filters; structure determination; order estimation; Akaike criterion; bounded but unknown noise model; and robustness and practical issues.

Subjects

mathematical models | time series | state-space | input-output models | model structures | parametrization | identifiability | non-parametric methods | prediction error | parameter estimation | convergence | consistency | andasymptotic distribution | maximum likelihood estimation | recursive estimation | Kalman filters | structure determination | order estimation | Akaike criterion | bounded noise models | robustness

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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