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24.903 Language and its Structure III: Semantics and Pragmatics (MIT) 24.903 Language and its Structure III: Semantics and Pragmatics (MIT)

Description

This course gives an introduction to the science of linguistic meaning. There are two branches to this discipline: semantics, the study of conventional, "compositional meaning", and pragmatics, the study of interactional meaning. There are other contributaries: philosophy, logic, syntax, and psychology. We will try to give you an understanding of the concepts of semantics and pragmatics and of some of the technical tools that we use. This course gives an introduction to the science of linguistic meaning. There are two branches to this discipline: semantics, the study of conventional, "compositional meaning", and pragmatics, the study of interactional meaning. There are other contributaries: philosophy, logic, syntax, and psychology. We will try to give you an understanding of the concepts of semantics and pragmatics and of some of the technical tools that we use.

Subjects

semantic theory | semantic theory | pragmatic theory | pragmatic theory | form and meaning in natural languages | form and meaning in natural languages | Ambiguities of structure and of meaning | Ambiguities of structure and of meaning | Compositionality | Compositionality | Word meaning | Word meaning | Quantification and logical form | Quantification and logical form | indexicality | indexicality | discourse | discourse | presupposition | presupposition | Literal meaning vs speaker's meaning | Literal meaning vs speaker's meaning | Speech acts | Speech acts | conversational implicature meaning | conversational implicature meaning

License

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24.903 Language and its Structure III: Semantics and Pragmatics (MIT)

Description

This course gives an introduction to the science of linguistic meaning. There are two branches to this discipline: semantics, the study of conventional, "compositional meaning", and pragmatics, the study of interactional meaning. There are other contributaries: philosophy, logic, syntax, and psychology. We will try to give you an understanding of the concepts of semantics and pragmatics and of some of the technical tools that we use.

Subjects

semantic theory | pragmatic theory | form and meaning in natural languages | Ambiguities of structure and of meaning | Compositionality | Word meaning | Quantification and logical form | indexicality | discourse | presupposition | Literal meaning vs speaker's meaning | Speech acts | conversational implicature meaning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.903 Language and its Structure III: Semantics and Pragmatics (MIT)

Description

This course gives an introduction to the science of linguistic meaning. There are two branches to this discipline: semantics, the study of conventional, "compositional meaning", and pragmatics, the study of interactional meaning. There are other contributaries: philosophy, logic, syntax, and psychology. We will try to give you an understanding of the concepts of semantics and pragmatics and of some of the technical tools that we use.

Subjects

semantic theory | pragmatic theory | form and meaning in natural languages | Ambiguities of structure and of meaning | Compositionality | Word meaning | Quantification and logical form | indexicality | discourse | presupposition | Literal meaning vs speaker's meaning | Speech acts | conversational implicature meaning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Why study systematic theology? : with Karen Kilby in discussion with Professor Tom O'Loughlin Why study systematic theology? : with Karen Kilby in discussion with Professor Tom O'Loughlin

Description

In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr Karen Kilby, an expert in systematic theology, explains what is meant by ‘systematics’ within the field of theology, and how it emerges out of the questions that believers ask in seeking to make sense of their faith. In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr Karen Kilby, an expert in systematic theology, explains what is meant by ‘systematics’ within the field of theology, and how it emerges out of the questions that believers ask in seeking to make sense of their faith.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | meaning | meaning | religion | religion | questions | questions | faith | faith | belief | belief | reason | reason | systematics | systematics

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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24.09 Minds and Machines (MIT) 24.09 Minds and Machines (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind.

Subjects

Searle | Searle | AI | AI | Turing Test | Turing Test | dualism | dualism | behaviorism | behaviorism | identity theory | identity theory | Kripke | Kripke | functionalism | functionalism | intentionality | intentionality | externalism | externalism | perception | perception | self-knowledge | self-knowledge | knowledge argument | knowledge argument | Chalmers | Chalmers | Nagel | Nagel | panprotopsychism | panprotopsychism | mysterianism | mysterianism | consciousness | consciousness | rene descartes | rene descartes | mind | mind | brain | brain | causal theory | causal theory | pain | pain | relief | relief | meaning | meaning | individualism | individualism | qualia | qualia | mind-body problem | mind-body problem | free will | free will

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.184 Architectural Design Workshop: Collage - Method and Form (MIT) 4.184 Architectural Design Workshop: Collage - Method and Form (MIT)

Description

This class investigates the theory, method, and form of collage. It studies not only the historical precedents for collage and their physical attributes, but the psychology and process that plays a part in the making of them. The class was broken into three parts, changing scales and methods each time, to introduce and study the rigor by which decisions were made in relation to the collage. The class was less about the making of art than the study of the processes by which art is made. This class investigates the theory, method, and form of collage. It studies not only the historical precedents for collage and their physical attributes, but the psychology and process that plays a part in the making of them. The class was broken into three parts, changing scales and methods each time, to introduce and study the rigor by which decisions were made in relation to the collage. The class was less about the making of art than the study of the processes by which art is made.

Subjects

collage | collage | modern art | modern art | painting | painting | art theory | art theory | deconstructivism | deconstructivism | semantics | semantics | syntactics | syntactics | art history | art history | id | id | ego | ego | superego | superego | psychology of art | psychology of art | meaning and representation | meaning and representation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.973 Advanced Semantics (MIT) 24.973 Advanced Semantics (MIT)

Description

This course is the second of the three parts of our graduate introduction to semantics. The others are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory. Like the other courses, this one is not meant as an overview of the field and its current developments. Our aim is to help you to develop the ability for semantic analysis, and we think that exploring a few topics in detail together with hands-on practical work is more effective than offering a bird's-eye view of everything. Once you have gained some experience in doing semantic analysis, reading around in the many recent handbooks and in current issues of major journals and attending our seminars and colloquia will give you all you need to prosper. Because we want to focus, we need to make difficult choices as This course is the second of the three parts of our graduate introduction to semantics. The others are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory. Like the other courses, this one is not meant as an overview of the field and its current developments. Our aim is to help you to develop the ability for semantic analysis, and we think that exploring a few topics in detail together with hands-on practical work is more effective than offering a bird's-eye view of everything. Once you have gained some experience in doing semantic analysis, reading around in the many recent handbooks and in current issues of major journals and attending our seminars and colloquia will give you all you need to prosper. Because we want to focus, we need to make difficult choices as

Subjects

semantics | semantics | logic | logic | meaning | meaning | syntactic systems | syntactic systems | generative grammar | generative grammar | displacement | displacement | intensional semantics | intensional semantics | Hintikka's idea | Hintikka's idea | accessibility relations | accessibility relations | modality | modality | quantificational theory of modality | quantificational theory of modality | material implication analysis | material implication analysis | strict implication analysis | strict implication analysis | tense | tense | conditionals | conditionals | progressive | progressive | perfect | perfect | de re | de re | de dicto | de dicto | raised subjects | raised subjects | scope paradox | scope paradox | overt world variables | overt world variables | restrictors | restrictors | syntax movement | syntax movement | wh-movement | wh-movement | DP | DP | VP | VP

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.910 Topics in Linguistic Theory: Propositional Attitudes (MIT) 24.910 Topics in Linguistic Theory: Propositional Attitudes (MIT)

Description

This course explores topics related to the representation and expression of propositional attitudes (e.g. belief, knowledge, and desires) and speech acts (e.g. saying and asking) in natural language. The main focus will be on semantics of predicates such as believe, know, want, say, ask, etc. Other topics will include the syntax of main and embedded clauses and formal representation of the pragmatics of conversation. The course provides practice in written and oral communication. This course explores topics related to the representation and expression of propositional attitudes (e.g. belief, knowledge, and desires) and speech acts (e.g. saying and asking) in natural language. The main focus will be on semantics of predicates such as believe, know, want, say, ask, etc. Other topics will include the syntax of main and embedded clauses and formal representation of the pragmatics of conversation. The course provides practice in written and oral communication.

Subjects

linguistic theory | linguistic theory | linguistics | linguistics | propositional attitudes | propositional attitudes | semantics | semantics | presupposition | presupposition | sequence of tense | sequence of tense | self-locating attitudes | self-locating attitudes | logophors | logophors | CP structure | CP structure | embedded clauses | embedded clauses | control | control | raising | raising | pramatics | pramatics | evidentials | evidentials | expressive meaning | expressive meaning | conversation | conversation | common ground | common ground | assertion | assertion | embedding verbs | embedding verbs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.910 Topics in Linguistic Theory: Laboratory Phonology (MIT) 24.910 Topics in Linguistic Theory: Laboratory Phonology (MIT)

Description

The goal of this course is to prepare you to engage in experimental investigations of questions related to linguistic theory, focusing on phonetics and phonology. The goal of this course is to prepare you to engage in experimental investigations of questions related to linguistic theory, focusing on phonetics and phonology.

Subjects

audition | audition | digital signal processing | digital signal processing | acoustics of vowels | acoustics of vowels | adaptive dispersion | adaptive dispersion | spectral analysis | spectral analysis | licensing by cue | licensing by cue | intonation | intonation | meaning of intonation | meaning of intonation | lexicon | lexicon | cntext | cntext | speech perception | speech perception | phonetics | phonetics | phonology | phonology | accent variation | accent variation | laboratory phonology | laboratory phonology | source-filter theory | source-filter theory | A/D conversion | A/D conversion | acoustics | acoustics

License

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24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT) 24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT)

Description

In this introductory course on the philosophy of language, we examine views on the nature of meaning, reference, truth, and their relationships. Other topics may include relationships between language and logic, language and knowledge, language and reality, language and acts performed through its use. No knowledge of logic or linguistics presupposed. In this introductory course on the philosophy of language, we examine views on the nature of meaning, reference, truth, and their relationships. Other topics may include relationships between language and logic, language and knowledge, language and reality, language and acts performed through its use. No knowledge of logic or linguistics presupposed.

Subjects

philosophy of language | philosophy of language | nature of meaning | nature of meaning | nature of reference | nature of reference | nature of truth | nature of truth | language and logic | language and logic | language and knowledge | language and knowledge | language and reality | language and reality | language and acts performed through its use | language and acts performed through its use

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT) 24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the philosophy of language. It examines different views on the nature of meaning, truth and reference, with special focus on the problem of understanding how linguistic communication works. This course is an introduction to the philosophy of language. It examines different views on the nature of meaning, truth and reference, with special focus on the problem of understanding how linguistic communication works.

Subjects

nature of meaning | reference | truth | and their relationships | nature of meaning | reference | truth | and their relationships | relationships between language and logic | language and knowledge | language and reality | language and acts performed through its use | relationships between language and logic | language and knowledge | language and reality | language and acts performed through its use | logic | logic | linguistics | linguistics | language | language | philosophy | philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.263 The Nature of Creativity (MIT) 24.263 The Nature of Creativity (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is an introduction to problems about creativity as it pervades human experience and behavior. Questions about imagination and innovation are studied in relation to the history of philosophy as well as more recent work in philosophy, affective psychology, cognitive studies, and art theory. Readings and guidance are aligned with the student's focus of interest. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is an introduction to problems about creativity as it pervades human experience and behavior. Questions about imagination and innovation are studied in relation to the history of philosophy as well as more recent work in philosophy, affective psychology, cognitive studies, and art theory. Readings and guidance are aligned with the student's focus of interest.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | creativity | creativity | creation | creation | emotion | emotion | discovery | discovery | invention | invention | experience | experience | evolution | evolution | affective computing | affective computing | meaning | meaning | aesthetics | aesthetics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Changing law: mental capacity legislation Changing law: mental capacity legislation

Description

The aim of this free course, Changing law: mental capacity legislation, is to consider how legal problems are identified and how the law develops to address those problems. It uses the evolution of legislation on decision making for mentally incapacitated adults to explore how development of the law is achieved. Through this study of the background to, and history of, the passage of legislation relating to mental capacity, legal meaning is discussed and explored. First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Changing law: mental capacity legislation. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 The aim of this free course, Changing law: mental capacity legislation, is to consider how legal problems are identified and how the law develops to address those problems. It uses the evolution of legislation on decision making for mentally incapacitated adults to explore how development of the law is achieved. Through this study of the background to, and history of, the passage of legislation relating to mental capacity, legal meaning is discussed and explored. First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Changing law: mental capacity legislation. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Changing law: mental capacity legislation. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Changing law: mental capacity legislation. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | The Law | The Law | W820_1 | W820_1 | law | law | legal problems | legal problems | evolution of legislation | evolution of legislation | mentally incapacitated adults | mentally incapacitated adults | development of law | development of law | legal meaning | legal meaning

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT) 21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT)

Description

"Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion, "Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion,

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | literary art | literary art | language | language | aethetic | aethetic | meaning | meaning | poetic drama | poetic drama | hymns | hymns | lyrics | lyrics | history | history | rhetoric | rhetoric | song | song | drama | drama | comedy | comedy | verse | verse | form | form | rhyme | rhyme | prose | prose | musical | musical | ambiguity | ambiguity | symbolism | symbolism | world | world | irony | irony | style | style | stylistic | stylistic | poetic diction | poetic diction | simile | simile | connections | connections | cultures | cultures | genres | genres | elements of poetry | elements of poetry | lines | lines | stanzas | stanzas | English love sonnets | English love sonnets | sound | sound | figuration | figuration | literary tradition | literary tradition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT) 21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT)

Description

As the course title suggests, this class is meant to acquaint you with the literary and rhetorical tradition of the essay, a genre which has been described by one scholar as "the meeting ground between art and philosophy," and by another as "the place where the self finds a pattern in the world, and the world finds a pattern in the self". Though the essay is part of a tradition of prose which stretches back to antiquity, it is also a thoroughly modern and popular form of writing, found in print media and on the web. As the course title suggests, this class is meant to acquaint you with the literary and rhetorical tradition of the essay, a genre which has been described by one scholar as "the meeting ground between art and philosophy," and by another as "the place where the self finds a pattern in the world, and the world finds a pattern in the self". Though the essay is part of a tradition of prose which stretches back to antiquity, it is also a thoroughly modern and popular form of writing, found in print media and on the web.

Subjects

reading | reading | writing | writing | essay | essay | literary | literary | rhetorical | rhetorical | tradition | tradition | genre | genre | prose | prose | antiquity | antiquity | modern | modern | popular | popular | form | form | print | print | media | media | web | web | functions | functions | commentary | commentary | others | others | textual | textual | numerical | numerical | data | data | discovery | discovery | meaning | meaning | personal experience | personal experience | narration | narration | specialized | specialized | knowledge | knowledge | general | general | audience. | audience.

License

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24.213 Philosophy of Film (MIT) 24.213 Philosophy of Film (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is a seminar on the philosophical analysis of film art, with an emphasis on the ways in which it creates meaning through techniques that define a formal structure. There is a particular focus on aesthetic problems about appearance and reality, literary and visual effects, communication and alienation through film technology. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is a seminar on the philosophical analysis of film art, with an emphasis on the ways in which it creates meaning through techniques that define a formal structure. There is a particular focus on aesthetic problems about appearance and reality, literary and visual effects, communication and alienation through film technology.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | seminar | seminar | analysis | analysis | film | film | art | art | meaning | meaning | formal structure | formal structure | aesthetic | aesthetic | problems | problems | appearance | appearance | reality | reality | literary | literary | visual effects | visual effects | communication | communication | alienation | alienation | technology | technology | Beauty and the Beast | Beauty and the Beast | Welles | Welles | Orson | Orson | Citizen Kane | Citizen Kane | Allen | Allen | Woody | Woody | The Purple Rose of Cairo | The Purple Rose of Cairo | Visconti | Visconti | Luchino | Luchino | Death in Venice | Death in Venice | Renoir | Renoir | Jean | Jean | The Rules of the Game | The Rules of the Game | Hitchcock | Hitchcock | Alfred | Alfred | The 39 Steps | The 39 Steps | Lindstrom | Lindstrom | Megahey | Megahey | BBC Television | BBC Television | The Magnificent Ambersons | The Magnificent Ambersons | The Crime of Monsieur Lange | The Crime of Monsieur Lange | Le Roi d'Yveto | Le Roi d'Yveto

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.973 Advanced Semantics (MIT) 24.973 Advanced Semantics (MIT)

Description

This course is the second of the three parts of our graduate introduction to semantics. The others are 24.970 "Introduction to Semantics" and 24.954 "Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory". Like the other courses, this one is not meant as an overview of the field and its current developments. Our aim is to help you develop the ability for semantic analysis, and we think that exploring a few topics in detail together with hands-on practical work is more effective than offering a bird's-eye view of everything. Once you have gained some experience in doing semantic analysis, reading around in the many recent handbooks and in current issues of major journals and attending our seminars and colloquia will give you all you need to prosper. Because we want to focus, we need to make This course is the second of the three parts of our graduate introduction to semantics. The others are 24.970 "Introduction to Semantics" and 24.954 "Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory". Like the other courses, this one is not meant as an overview of the field and its current developments. Our aim is to help you develop the ability for semantic analysis, and we think that exploring a few topics in detail together with hands-on practical work is more effective than offering a bird's-eye view of everything. Once you have gained some experience in doing semantic analysis, reading around in the many recent handbooks and in current issues of major journals and attending our seminars and colloquia will give you all you need to prosper. Because we want to focus, we need to make

Subjects

semantics | semantics | logic | logic | meaning | meaning | syntactic systems | syntactic systems | generative grammar | generative grammar

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.S914 Conversations You Can't Have on Campus: Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Identity (MIT) 17.S914 Conversations You Can't Have on Campus: Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Identity (MIT)

Description

What is race? What is ethnicity? How can communication and relationships between men and women be improved? What causes segregation in our society? How do stereotypes develop and why do they persist? How do an individual's racial, ethnic, and sexual identities form and develop? This course explores these topics and more. What is race? What is ethnicity? How can communication and relationships between men and women be improved? What causes segregation in our society? How do stereotypes develop and why do they persist? How do an individual's racial, ethnic, and sexual identities form and develop? This course explores these topics and more.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | affirmative action | affirmative action | religion | religion | sexuality | sexuality | evolution | evolution | creationism | creationism | prostitution | prostitution | beauty | beauty | meaning of life | meaning of life | health care | health care | euthanasia | euthanasia | gender | gender | race | race

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.09 Minds and Machines (MIT) 24.09 Minds and Machines (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. Some of the questions we will discuss include the following. Can computers think? Is the mind an immaterial thing? Or is the mind the brain? Or does the mind stand to the brain as a computer program stands to the hardware? How can creatures like ourselves think thoughts that are "about" things? (For example, we can all think that Aristotle is a philosopher, and in that sense think "about" Aristotle, but what is the explanation of this quite remarkable ability?) Can I know whether your experiences and my experiences when we look at raspberries, fire trucks and stop lights are the same? Can consciousness be given a scientific explanation? This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. Some of the questions we will discuss include the following. Can computers think? Is the mind an immaterial thing? Or is the mind the brain? Or does the mind stand to the brain as a computer program stands to the hardware? How can creatures like ourselves think thoughts that are "about" things? (For example, we can all think that Aristotle is a philosopher, and in that sense think "about" Aristotle, but what is the explanation of this quite remarkable ability?) Can I know whether your experiences and my experiences when we look at raspberries, fire trucks and stop lights are the same? Can consciousness be given a scientific explanation?

Subjects

Searle; AI | Searle; AI | dualism | dualism | behaviorism | behaviorism | identity theory | identity theory | functionalism | functionalism | intentionality | intentionality | externalism | externalism | self-knowledge | self-knowledge | knowledge argument | knowledge argument | chalmer | chalmer | panprotopsychism | panprotopsychism | mysterianism | mysterianism | conciousness | conciousness | rene descartes | rene descartes | mind | mind | brain | brain | causal theory | causal theory | pain | pain | relief | relief | meaning | meaning | individualism | individualism | qualia | qualia | mind-body problem | mind-body problem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.212 Myth, Ritual, and Symbolism (MIT) 21A.212 Myth, Ritual, and Symbolism (MIT)

Description

Human beings are symbol-making as well as tool-making animals. We understand our world and shape our lives in large part by assigning meanings to objects, beings, and persons; by connecting things together in symbolic patterns; and by creating elaborate forms of symbolic action and narrative. In this introductory subject we consider how symbols are created and structured; how they draw on and give meaning to different domains of the human world; how they are woven into politics, family life, and the life cycle; and how we can interpret them. The semester will be devoted to a number of topics in symbolism. Metaphor and Other Figurative Language The Raw Materials of Symbolism, especially Animals and The Human Body Cosmology and Complex Symbolic Systems Ritual, including Symbolic Curing Human beings are symbol-making as well as tool-making animals. We understand our world and shape our lives in large part by assigning meanings to objects, beings, and persons; by connecting things together in symbolic patterns; and by creating elaborate forms of symbolic action and narrative. In this introductory subject we consider how symbols are created and structured; how they draw on and give meaning to different domains of the human world; how they are woven into politics, family life, and the life cycle; and how we can interpret them. The semester will be devoted to a number of topics in symbolism. Metaphor and Other Figurative Language The Raw Materials of Symbolism, especially Animals and The Human Body Cosmology and Complex Symbolic Systems Ritual, including Symbolic Curing

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | myth | myth | ritual | ritual | symbolism | symbolism | animals | animals | symbolic system | symbolic system | meaning | meaning | life cycle | life cycle | metaphor | metaphor | figurative language | figurative language | human body | human body | cosmology | cosmology | magic | magic | narrative | narrative | mythology | mythology | patterns | patterns | culture | culture | sign | sign | tropes | tropes | classification | classification | interpretation | interpretation | folktale | folktale | power | power | passage | passage | persuasion | persuasion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.S60 The Art and Science of Happiness (MIT) ES.S60 The Art and Science of Happiness (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at current theories on happiness and positive psychology as well as practical implications of those theories for our own lives. It explores the concept of happiness, different cultural definitions of happiness, and the connection between happiness, optimism, and meaning. Also explored are practical strategies for creating more opportunities for happiness in our lives and for learning how to deal more effectively with sources of unhappiness. This seminar is part of the Experimental Study Group at MIT. This seminar looks at current theories on happiness and positive psychology as well as practical implications of those theories for our own lives. It explores the concept of happiness, different cultural definitions of happiness, and the connection between happiness, optimism, and meaning. Also explored are practical strategies for creating more opportunities for happiness in our lives and for learning how to deal more effectively with sources of unhappiness. This seminar is part of the Experimental Study Group at MIT.

Subjects

happiness | happiness | positive psychology | positive psychology | optimism | optimism | gratitude | gratitude | pleasure | pleasure | cognitive style | cognitive style | pessimism | pessimism | sadness | sadness | depression | depression | unhappiness | unhappiness | suffering | suffering | relationships | relationships | wellness | wellness | flow | flow | values | values | meaning | meaning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.962 Special Topics in Media Technology: Computational Semantics (MIT) MAS.962 Special Topics in Media Technology: Computational Semantics (MIT)

Description

How do words get their meanings? How can word meanings be represented and used by machines? We will explore three families of approaches to these questions from a computational perspective. Relational / structural methods such as semantic networks represent the meaning of words in terms of their relations to other words. Knowledge of the world through perception and action leads to the notion of external grounding, a process by which word meanings are 'attached' to the world. How an agent theorizes about, and conceptualizes its world provides yet another foundation for word meanings. We will examine each of these perspectives, and consider ways to integrate them. How do words get their meanings? How can word meanings be represented and used by machines? We will explore three families of approaches to these questions from a computational perspective. Relational / structural methods such as semantic networks represent the meaning of words in terms of their relations to other words. Knowledge of the world through perception and action leads to the notion of external grounding, a process by which word meanings are 'attached' to the world. How an agent theorizes about, and conceptualizes its world provides yet another foundation for word meanings. We will examine each of these perspectives, and consider ways to integrate them.

Subjects

signifier | signifier | sign | sign | agent | agent | semiotics | semiotics | semantics | semantics | computational semantics | computational semantics | meaning | meaning | words | words | external grounding | external grounding | relational networks | relational networks

License

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24.973 Advanced Semantics (MIT) 24.973 Advanced Semantics (MIT)

Description

This course is the second of the three parts of our graduate introduction to semantics. The others are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory. Like the other courses, this one is not meant as an overview of the field and its current developments. Our aim is to help you develop the ability for semantic analysis, and we think that exploring a few topics in detail together with hands-on practical work is more effective than offering a bird’s-eye view of everything. Once you have gained some experience in doing semantic analysis, reading around in the many recent handbooks and in current issues of major journals and attending our seminars and colloquia will give you all you need to prosper. Because we want to focus, we need to make difficult choic This course is the second of the three parts of our graduate introduction to semantics. The others are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory. Like the other courses, this one is not meant as an overview of the field and its current developments. Our aim is to help you develop the ability for semantic analysis, and we think that exploring a few topics in detail together with hands-on practical work is more effective than offering a bird’s-eye view of everything. Once you have gained some experience in doing semantic analysis, reading around in the many recent handbooks and in current issues of major journals and attending our seminars and colloquia will give you all you need to prosper. Because we want to focus, we need to make difficult choic

Subjects

semantics | semantics | logic | logic | meaning | meaning | syntactic systems | syntactic systems | generative grammar | generative grammar

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Learning to Teach Inclusively OER Videos in Digital Media

Description

Project web-site – www.wlv.ac.uk/teachinclusively e-mail: oer@wlv.ac.uk Videos are in .mp4 format (H.264 compression) and are playable with most media players. If you have any problems with the playback we recommend free open source VLC media player – www.videolan.org or all of our published videos can be viewed online on www.vimeo.com/oer/videos in your browser. Please contact us if you need any help oer@wlv.ac.uk , or fill in Problem Report form - https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dEg4a1h6T0ZzenRkVnlIcW1iYXpadHc6MQ

Subjects

inclusive teaching | video resource | reasonable adjustment | whole group reflection | inclusive content | individual task | facilitating | co-construction of meaning | tutor position | performing | critiquing | analysing | reflecting | safe environment | ukoer | omac | oer | lti | design | W000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT)

Description

As the course title suggests, this class is meant to acquaint you with the literary and rhetorical tradition of the essay, a genre which has been described by one scholar as "the meeting ground between art and philosophy," and by another as "the place where the self finds a pattern in the world, and the world finds a pattern in the self". Though the essay is part of a tradition of prose which stretches back to antiquity, it is also a thoroughly modern and popular form of writing, found in print media and on the web.

Subjects

reading | writing | essay | literary | rhetorical | tradition | genre | prose | antiquity | modern | popular | form | print | media | web | functions | commentary | others | textual | numerical | data | discovery | meaning | personal experience | narration | specialized | knowledge | general | audience.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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