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HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT) HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod

Subjects

medical imaging | medical imaging | medical lab | medical lab | medical technology | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | magnetic resonance imaging | fMRI | fMRI | signal processing | signal processing | human brain mapping | human brain mapping | function | function | image formation physics | image formation physics | metabolism | metabolism | psychology | psychology | image signals | image signals | parenchymal | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | functional data analysis | functional data analysis | experimental design | experimental design | statistical models | statistical models | human subjects | human subjects | informed consent | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | institutional review board requirements | safety | safety | medical | medical | brain scan | brain scan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT) HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team-taught multidisciplinary course provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. It begins with in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include: fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, and building and applying statistical models for fMRI data; and human subject issues including informed consent, institutional review board requirements and safety in the high field environment. Additional Facul This team-taught multidisciplinary course provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. It begins with in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include: fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, and building and applying statistical models for fMRI data; and human subject issues including informed consent, institutional review board requirements and safety in the high field environment. Additional Facul

Subjects

medical imaging | medical imaging | medical lab | medical lab | medical technology | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | magnetic resonance imaging | MRI | MRI | fMRI | fMRI | signal processing | signal processing | human brain mapping | human brain mapping | function | function | image formation physics | image formation physics | metabolism | metabolism | psychology | psychology | physiology | physiology | image signals | image signals | image processing | image processing | parenchymal | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | neurology | neurology | functional data analysis | functional data analysis | experimental design | experimental design | statistical models | statistical models | human subjects | human subjects | informed consent | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | institutional review board requirements | safety | safety | medical | medical | brain scan | brain scan | brain imaging | brain imaging | DTI | DTI | vision | vision

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.718 Special Topics at Edgerton Center: D-Lab Health: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT) SP.718 Special Topics at Edgerton Center: D-Lab Health: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Health provides multi-disciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break and work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address the challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing. D-Lab Health provides multi-disciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break and work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address the challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing.

Subjects

global health | global health | medicine | medicine | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | disease | disease | disease prevention | disease prevention | vaccine | vaccine | immunization | immunization | drug | drug | health diagnostic | health diagnostic | medical informatics | medical informatics | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | co-creation | co-creation | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device | medical device | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | medical ethics | medical ethics | infant mortality | infant mortality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT) HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod

Subjects

medical lab | medical lab | medical technology | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | magnetic resonance imaging | fMRI | fMRI | signal processing | signal processing | human brain mapping | human brain mapping | function | function | image formation physics | image formation physics | metabolism | metabolism | psychology | psychology | image signals | image signals | parenchymal | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | functional data analysis | functional data analysis | experimental design | experimental design | statistical models | statistical models | human subjects | human subjects | informed consent | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | institutional review board requirements | safety | safety | medical | medical | brain scan | brain scan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.725 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT) SP.725 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing. D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing.

Subjects

global health | global health | medicine | medicine | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | disease | disease | disease prevention | disease prevention | vaccine | vaccine | immunization | immunization | drug | drug | health diagnostic | health diagnostic | medical informatics | medical informatics | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device | medical device | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | co-creation | co-creation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.950J Engineering Biomedical Information: From Bioinformatics to Biosurveillance (MIT) HST.950J Engineering Biomedical Information: From Bioinformatics to Biosurveillance (MIT)

Description

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the technological advances in biomedical informatics and their applications at the intersection of computer science and biomedical research. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the technological advances in biomedical informatics and their applications at the intersection of computer science and biomedical research.

Subjects

biomedical informatics | biomedical informatics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | biomedical research | biomedical research | biological computing | biological computing | biomedical computing | biomedical computing | computational genomics | computational genomics | genomics | genomics | microarrays | microarrays | proteomics | proteomics | pharmacogenomics | pharmacogenomics | genomic privacy | genomic privacy | clinical informatics | clinical informatics | biosurveillance | biosurveillance | privacy | privacy | biotechnology | biotechnology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.380J Biological Engineering Design (MIT) 20.380J Biological Engineering Design (MIT)

Description

This course illustrates how knowledge and principles of biology, biochemistry, and engineering are integrated to create new products for societal benefit. It uses a case study format to examine recently developed products of pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries: how a product evolves from initial idea, through patents, testing, evaluation, production, and marketing. Emphasizes scientific and engineering principles; the responsibility scientists, engineers, and business executives have for the consequences of their technology; and instruction and practice in written and oral communication. The topic focus of this class will vary from year to year. This version looks at inflammation underlying many diseases, specifically its role in cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. This course illustrates how knowledge and principles of biology, biochemistry, and engineering are integrated to create new products for societal benefit. It uses a case study format to examine recently developed products of pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries: how a product evolves from initial idea, through patents, testing, evaluation, production, and marketing. Emphasizes scientific and engineering principles; the responsibility scientists, engineers, and business executives have for the consequences of their technology; and instruction and practice in written and oral communication. The topic focus of this class will vary from year to year. This version looks at inflammation underlying many diseases, specifically its role in cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Subjects

inflammation | inflammation | biomedical engineering | biomedical engineering | cancer | cancer | diabetes | diabetes | obesity | obesity | cardiovascular disease | cardiovascular disease | biomedical entrepreneurship | biomedical entrepreneurship | biomedical startup | biomedical startup

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT) 21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | cross-cultural study | cross-cultural study | bio-medical ethics | bio-medical ethics | moral foundations | moral foundations | science | science | western bio-medicine | western bio-medicine | case studies | case studies | abortion | abortion | contraception | contraception | cloning | cloning | organ transplantation | organ transplantation | medical technologies | medical technologies | practice | practice | availability | availability | medical services | medical services | globe | globe | kinship | kinship | personhood | personhood | critique | critique | anthropological | anthropological | feminist | feminist | legal | legal | religious | religious | theorists. | theorists. | theorists | theorists | 21A.216 | 21A.216 | SP.622 | SP.622

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.302J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT) 21A.302J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of biomedical ethics, examining moral foundations of the science and practice of Western biomedicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation and other issues. It evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. Also discussed are critiques of the biomedical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of biomedical ethics, examining moral foundations of the science and practice of Western biomedicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation and other issues. It evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. Also discussed are critiques of the biomedical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

21A.302 | 21A.302 | WGS.271 | WGS.271 | bio-medical ethics | bio-medical ethics | medical technologies | medical technologies | biotechnologies | biotechnologies | halth | halth | sexuality | sexuality | morality | morality | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | kinship | kinship | gender | gender | abortion | abortion | contraception | contraception | reproductive technologies | reproductive technologies | pharmaceuticals | pharmaceuticals | end of life care | end of life care | healing practices | healing practices | anthropology | anthropology | medical experimentation | medical experimentation | sterilization | sterilization | Lynchburg | Lynchburg | biological citizenship | biological citizenship | clinical trials | clinical trials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.710 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT) EC.710 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing. D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing.

Subjects

global health | global health | medicine | medicine | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | disease | disease | disease prevention | disease prevention | vaccine | vaccine | immunization | immunization | drug | drug | health diagnostic | health diagnostic | medical informatics | medical informatics | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device | medical device | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | co-creation | co-creation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT) HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This innovative, trans-faculty subject teaches how information technologies (IT) are reshaping and redefining the health care marketplace through improved economies of scale, greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care to patients, advanced tools for patient education and self-care, network integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and the emergence of e-commerce in health care. Student tutorials provide an opportunity for interactive discussion. Interdisciplinary project teams comprised of Harvard and MIT graduate students in medicine, business, law, education, engineering, computer science, public health, and government collaborate to design innovative IT applications. Projects are presented during the final class Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This innovative, trans-faculty subject teaches how information technologies (IT) are reshaping and redefining the health care marketplace through improved economies of scale, greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care to patients, advanced tools for patient education and self-care, network integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and the emergence of e-commerce in health care. Student tutorials provide an opportunity for interactive discussion. Interdisciplinary project teams comprised of Harvard and MIT graduate students in medicine, business, law, education, engineering, computer science, public health, and government collaborate to design innovative IT applications. Projects are presented during the final class

Subjects

health care | health care | health care policy | health care policy | patient behavior | patient behavior | information management | information management | medical informatics | medical informatics | medical records | medical records | health record | health record | online medicine | online medicine | PHR | PHR | EHR | EHR | patient privacy | patient privacy | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | start-up | start-up | innovation | innovation | cybermedicine | cybermedicine | telemedicine | telemedicine | non-profit | non-profit | pharmaceutical | pharmaceutical | insurance | insurance | hospital | hospital | doctor | doctor | patient | patient | medicine | medicine | social networking | social networking | economies of scale | economies of scale | patient education | patient education | self-care | self-care | network integration | network integration | decision support tools | decision support tools | disease managment | disease managment | health economics | health economics | clinical effectiveness | clinical effectiveness | medical software | medical software | mobile applications | mobile applications | intellectual property | intellectual property

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Wartime medical equipment at the Elswick Works

Description

Subjects

shadow | portrait | eye | industry | face | wall | shirt | standing | mouth | hair | nose | boot | belt | uniform | factory | floor | serious | head | label | board | helmet | tie | moustache | medical | suit | doctor | ear | syringe | strap | ww2 | letter | lip | medicine | products | uniforms | unusual | baggage | colleague | crease | arp | attentive | distracted | newcastleupontyne | digitalimage | wartime | secondworldwar | worldwartwo | rivertyne | manufacturing | industrialheritage | medicalequipment | elswick | blackandwhitephotograph | scotswood | drclarkson | airraidprecautions | neutralbackground | lordarmstrong | vickersarmstrong | elswickworks | williamgeorgearmstrong | medicalofficer | workshopoftheworld | scotswoodworks | vickersarmstrongcollection | medicalbelt | wartimemedicalbelt | 25november1940

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Wartime medical equipment at the Elswick Works

Description

View of Dr Clarkson and a colleague, wearing wartime medical equipment at the Elswick Works, Newcastle upon Tyne, 25 November 1940 (TWAM ref. 1027/neg15299). Dr Clarkson is ?armed? with a wartime medical belt, holding a syringe and medical supplies. Healing was essential but smiling was optional! ?Workshop of the World? is a phrase often used to describe Britain?s manufacturing dominance during the Nineteenth Century. It?s also a very apt description for the Elswick Works and Scotswood Works of Vickers Armstrong and its predecessor companies. These great factories, situated in Newcastle along the banks of the River Tyne, employed hundreds of thousands of men and women and built a huge variety of products for customers around the globe. The Elswick Works was established by William George Armstrong (later Lord Armstrong) in 1847 to manufacture hydraulic cranes. From these relatively humble beginnings the company diversified into many fields including shipbuilding, armaments and locomotives. By 1953 the Elswick Works covered 70 acres and extended over a mile along the River Tyne. This set of images, mostly taken from our Vickers Armstrong collection, includes fascinating views of the factories at Elswick and Scotswood, the products they produced and the people that worked there. By preserving these archives we can ensure that their legacy lives on. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email info@twarchives.org.uk.

Subjects

elswickworks | newcastleupontyne | factory | industry | vickersarmstrong | secondworldwar | wartime | medicalequipment | medicalbelt | syringe | medicine | medicalofficer | uniforms | serious | arp | airraidprecautions | doctor | ww2 | industrialheritage | blackandwhitephotograph | medical | worldwartwo | 25november1940 | drclarkson | colleague | wartimemedicalbelt | workshopoftheworld | portrait | manufacturing | scotswoodworks | rivertyne | products | williamgeorgearmstrong | lordarmstrong | vickersarmstrongcollection | elswick | scotswood | digitalimage | suit | uniform | helmet | letter | label | belt | crease | shadow | neutralbackground | unusual | floor | wall | board | boot | baggage | strap | tie | shirt | moustache | hair | head | eye | nose | ear | mouth | lip | face | attentive | distracted | standing

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums | FlickR

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HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod

Subjects

medical imaging | medical lab | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | fMRI | signal processing | human brain mapping | function | image formation physics | metabolism | psychology | image signals | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | functional data analysis | experimental design | statistical models | human subjects | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | safety | medical | brain scan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT) 3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th

Subjects

Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | stress-strain relationships | stress-strain relationships | stress transformation | stress transformation | elasticity | elasticity | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | bubble raft models | bubble raft models | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | plasticity and fracture | plasticity and fracture | Case studies | Case studies | materials selection | materials selection | bicycle frames | bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants | stress shielding in biomedical implants | residual stresses in thin films | residual stresses in thin films | ancient materials | ancient materials | standard mechanical tests | standard mechanical tests | solid mechanics | solid mechanics | mechanical behavior of materials | mechanical behavior of materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.718 Special Topics at Edgerton Center: D-Lab Health: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Health provides multi-disciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break and work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address the challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing.

Subjects

global health | medicine | developing nation | third world | disease | disease prevention | vaccine | immunization | drug | health diagnostic | medical informatics | appropriate technology | sustainable development | co-creation | inequality | poverty | poor | medical device | medical device design | innovation | prototyping | medical ethics | infant mortality

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24.06J Bioethics (MIT) 24.06J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers. This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers.

Subjects

24.06 | 24.06 | STS.006 | STS.006 | medical ethics | medical ethics | ethics | ethics | genetics | genetics | life support | life support | stem cell | stem cell | GM | GM | genetically modified | genetically modified | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | risk | risk | biomedical | biomedical | medicine | medicine | cloning | cloning | euthanasia | euthanasia | enhancing or cheating | enhancing or cheating | abortion | abortion | eugenics | eugenics | slippery slope | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ transplant | organ donor | organ donor | disease | disease | public health | public health | health care | health care

License

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STS.005 Disease and Society in America (MIT) STS.005 Disease and Society in America (MIT)

Description

This course examines the growing importance of medicine in culture, economics and politics. It uses an historical approach to examine the changing patterns of disease, the causes of morbidity and mortality, the evolution of medical theory and practice, the development of hospitals and the medical profession, the rise of the biomedical research industry, and the ethics of health care in America. This course examines the growing importance of medicine in culture, economics and politics. It uses an historical approach to examine the changing patterns of disease, the causes of morbidity and mortality, the evolution of medical theory and practice, the development of hospitals and the medical profession, the rise of the biomedical research industry, and the ethics of health care in America.

Subjects

Science | Science | technology | technology | society | society | disease | disease | America | America | health | health | life | life | smallpox | smallpox | tuberculosis | tuberculosis | obesity | obesity | heart disease | heart disease | mental illness | mental illness | medicine | medicine | culture | culture | economics | economics | politics | politics | Health care | Health care | historical approach | historical approach | morbidity | morbidity | mortality | mortality | medical theory | medical theory | practice | practice | hospitals | hospitals | biomedical | biomedical | research | research | industry | industry | ethics | ethics

License

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HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team-taught multidisciplinary course provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. It begins with in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include: fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, and building and applying statistical models for fMRI data; and human subject issues including informed consent, institutional review board requirements and safety in the high field environment. Additional Facul

Subjects

medical imaging | medical lab | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | MRI | fMRI | signal processing | human brain mapping | function | image formation physics | metabolism | psychology | physiology | image signals | image processing | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | neurology | functional data analysis | experimental design | statistical models | human subjects | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | safety | medical | brain scan | brain imaging | DTI | vision

License

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21W.746 Humanistic Perspectives on Medicine: From Ancient Greece to Modern America (MIT) 21W.746 Humanistic Perspectives on Medicine: From Ancient Greece to Modern America (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to explore the human side of medicine: the nature of the physician's identity and obligations; the history and philosophy of the Western medical tradition; the experience of being ill and being a patient; and the challenges of medical ethics. The writing in this class is therefore conceived as an instrument of exploration, and is an integral part of the class's activities. This course is designed to explore the human side of medicine: the nature of the physician's identity and obligations; the history and philosophy of the Western medical tradition; the experience of being ill and being a patient; and the challenges of medical ethics. The writing in this class is therefore conceived as an instrument of exploration, and is an integral part of the class's activities.

Subjects

Human | Human | medicine | medicine | physician | physician | identity | identity | obligations | obligations | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | Western medical tradition | Western medical tradition | ill | ill | patient | patient | medical ethics | medical ethics | writing | writing | instrument | instrument | exploration | exploration

License

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21A.215 Medical Anthropology: Culture, Society, and Ethics in Disease and Health (MIT) 21A.215 Medical Anthropology: Culture, Society, and Ethics in Disease and Health (MIT)

Description

This course looks at medicine from a cross-cultural perspective, focusing on the human, as opposed to biological, side of things. Students learn how to analyze various kinds of medical practice as cultural systems. Particular emphasis is placed on Western (bio-) medicine; students examine how biomedicine constructs disease, health, body, and mind, and how it articulates with other institutions, national and international. This course looks at medicine from a cross-cultural perspective, focusing on the human, as opposed to biological, side of things. Students learn how to analyze various kinds of medical practice as cultural systems. Particular emphasis is placed on Western (bio-) medicine; students examine how biomedicine constructs disease, health, body, and mind, and how it articulates with other institutions, national and international.

Subjects

ethics | ethics | biomedicine | biomedicine | cultural systems | cultural systems | medical practice | medical practice | health | health | disease | disease | mental illness | mental illness | leprosy | leprosy | placebo | placebo | pharmaceuticals | pharmaceuticals | racism | racism | sexism | sexism | medical institutions | medical institutions | chronic illness | chronic illness | reproductive technologies | reproductive technologies | isolation | isolation | international health | international health

License

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20.453J Biomedical Information Technology (MIT) 20.453J Biomedical Information Technology (MIT)

Description

This course teaches the design of contemporary information systems for biological and medical data. Examples are chosen from biology and medicine to illustrate complete life cycle information systems, beginning with data acquisition, following to data storage and finally to retrieval and analysis. Design of appropriate databases, client-server strategies, data interchange protocols, and computational modeling architectures. Students are expected to have some familiarity with scientific application software and a basic understanding of at least one contemporary programming language (e.g. C, C++, Java, Lisp, Perl, Python). A major term project is required of all students. This subject is open to motivated seniors having a strong interest in biomedical engineering and information system desig This course teaches the design of contemporary information systems for biological and medical data. Examples are chosen from biology and medicine to illustrate complete life cycle information systems, beginning with data acquisition, following to data storage and finally to retrieval and analysis. Design of appropriate databases, client-server strategies, data interchange protocols, and computational modeling architectures. Students are expected to have some familiarity with scientific application software and a basic understanding of at least one contemporary programming language (e.g. C, C++, Java, Lisp, Perl, Python). A major term project is required of all students. This subject is open to motivated seniors having a strong interest in biomedical engineering and information system desig

Subjects

20.453 | 20.453 | 2.771 | 2.771 | HST.958 | HST.958 | imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | metadata | metadata | molecular biology | molecular biology | medical records | medical records | DICOM | DICOM | RDF | RDF | OWL | OWL | SPARQL | SPARQL | SBML | SBML | CellML | CellML | semantic web | semantic web | BioHaystack | BioHaystack | database | database | schema | schema | ExperiBase | ExperiBase | genomics | genomics | proteomics | proteomics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | computational biology | computational biology | clinical decision support | clinical decision support | clinical trial | clinical trial | microarray | microarray | gel electrophoresis | gel electrophoresis | diagnosis | diagnosis | pathway modeling | pathway modeling | XML | XML | SQL | SQL | relational database | relational database | biological data | biological data | ontologies | ontologies | drug development | drug development | drug discovery | drug discovery | drug target | drug target | pharmaceutical | pharmaceutical | gene sequencing | gene sequencing

License

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20.453J Biomedical Information Technology (BE.453J) (MIT) 20.453J Biomedical Information Technology (BE.453J) (MIT)

Description

The objective of this subject is to teach the design of contemporary information systems for biological and medical data. These data are growing at a prodigious rate, and new information systems are required. This subject will cover examples from biology and medicine to illustrate complete life cycle information systems, beginning with data acquisition, following to data storage and finally to retrieval and analysis. Design of appropriate databases, client-server strategies, data interchange protocols, and computational modeling architectures will be covered. Students are expected to have some familiarity with scientific application software and a basic understanding of at least one contemporary programming language (C, C++, Java®, Lisp, Perl, Python, etc.). A major term project is The objective of this subject is to teach the design of contemporary information systems for biological and medical data. These data are growing at a prodigious rate, and new information systems are required. This subject will cover examples from biology and medicine to illustrate complete life cycle information systems, beginning with data acquisition, following to data storage and finally to retrieval and analysis. Design of appropriate databases, client-server strategies, data interchange protocols, and computational modeling architectures will be covered. Students are expected to have some familiarity with scientific application software and a basic understanding of at least one contemporary programming language (C, C++, Java®, Lisp, Perl, Python, etc.). A major term project is

Subjects

imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | metadata | metadata | medical record | medical record | DICOM | DICOM | computer architecture | computer architecture | client-server architecture | client-server architecture | SEM | SEM | TEM | TEM | OME | OME | RDF | RDF | semantic web | semantic web | BioHaystack | BioHaystack | database | database | schema | schema | ExperiBase | ExperiBase | genomics | genomics | proteomics | proteomics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | clinical decision support | clinical decision support | microarray | microarray | gel electrophoresis | gel electrophoresis | diagnosis | diagnosis | 20.453 | 20.453 | 2.771 | 2.771 | HST.958 | HST.958

License

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STS.006J Bioethics (MIT) STS.006J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

Many difficult ethical questions have arisen from the explosive growth of biomedical research and the health-care industry since World War II. When and how should doctors be allowed to help patients end their lives? Should embryos be cloned for research and/or reproduction? Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children? What sorts of living things is it appropriate to use as research subjects? How should we distribute scarce and expensive medical resources? While some of these questions are genuinely new, products of rapid changes in biomedical technology, others have been debated for centuries. Drawing on philosophy, history, and anthropology, this course will show students how problems in bioethics can be approached from a variety of perspectives, with the ai Many difficult ethical questions have arisen from the explosive growth of biomedical research and the health-care industry since World War II. When and how should doctors be allowed to help patients end their lives? Should embryos be cloned for research and/or reproduction? Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children? What sorts of living things is it appropriate to use as research subjects? How should we distribute scarce and expensive medical resources? While some of these questions are genuinely new, products of rapid changes in biomedical technology, others have been debated for centuries. Drawing on philosophy, history, and anthropology, this course will show students how problems in bioethics can be approached from a variety of perspectives, with the ai

Subjects

medical ethics | medical ethics | ethics | ethics | genetics | genetics | stem cell | stem cell | GM | GM | genetically modified | genetically modified | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | risk | risk | biomedical | biomedical | medicine | medicine | cloning | cloning | euthanasia | euthanasia | abortion | abortion | eugenics | eugenics | slippery slope | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ transplant | organ donor | organ donor | disease | disease | public health | public health | health care | health care

License

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HST.950J Biomedical Computing (MIT) HST.950J Biomedical Computing (MIT)

Description

Analyzes computational needs of clinical medicine reviews systems and approaches that have been used to support those needs, and the relationship between clinical data and gene and protein measurements. Topics: the nature of clinical data; architecture and design of healthcare information systems; privacy and security issues; medical expertsystems; introduction to bioinformatics. Case studies and guest lectures describe contemporary systems and research projects. Term project using large clinical and genomic data sets integrates classroom topics. Analyzes computational needs of clinical medicine reviews systems and approaches that have been used to support those needs, and the relationship between clinical data and gene and protein measurements. Topics: the nature of clinical data; architecture and design of healthcare information systems; privacy and security issues; medical expertsystems; introduction to bioinformatics. Case studies and guest lectures describe contemporary systems and research projects. Term project using large clinical and genomic data sets integrates classroom topics.

Subjects

HST.950 | HST.950 | medical informatics | medical informatics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | developing countries | developing countries | medical data | medical data | clinical data | clinical data | probabilistic models | probabilistic models | graphical models | graphical models | information theory | information theory | decision support | decision support | expert systems | expert systems | personal health records | personal health records | bayesian networks | bayesian networks | bayesian models | bayesian models | health information systems | health information systems | public health informatics | public health informatics | predictive genomics | predictive genomics | patient data privacy | patient data privacy

License

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