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3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT) 3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering. This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Subjects

Interactions between proteins | Interactions between proteins | cells | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Organ replacement therapies | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Biosensors | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Interactions between proteins | cells | Interactions between proteins | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | BE.340J | BE.340J | 3.051 | 3.051 | BE.340 | BE.340 | 20.340 | 20.340

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8.511 Theory of Solids I (MIT) 8.511 Theory of Solids I (MIT)

Description

This is the first term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include crystal structure and band theory, density functional theory, a survey of properties of metals and semiconductors, quantum Hall effect, phonons, electron phonon interaction and superconductivity. This is the first term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include crystal structure and band theory, density functional theory, a survey of properties of metals and semiconductors, quantum Hall effect, phonons, electron phonon interaction and superconductivity.

Subjects

physics of solids | physics of solids | elementary excitations | elementary excitations | symmetry | symmetry | theory of representations | theory of representations | energy bands | energy bands | excitons | excitons | critical points | critical points | response functions | response functions | interactions in the electron gas | interactions in the electron gas | electronic structure of metals | semimetals | electronic structure of metals | semimetals | semiconductors | semiconductors | insulators | insulators | Free electron model | Free electron model | Crystalline lattice | Crystalline lattice | Debye Waller factor | Debye Waller factor | Bravais lattice | Bravais lattice | Pseudopotential | Pseudopotential | van Hove singularity | van Hove singularity | Bloch oscillation | Bloch oscillation | quantization of orbits | quantization of orbits | de Haas-van Alphen effect | de Haas-van Alphen effect | Quantum Hall effect | Quantum Hall effect | Electron-electron interaction | Electron-electron interaction | Hartree-Fock approximation | Hartree-Fock approximation | Exchange energy for Jellium | Exchange energy for Jellium | Density functional theory | Density functional theory | Hubbard model | Hubbard model | Electron-phonon coupling | Electron-phonon coupling | phonons | phonons

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3.40J Physical Metallurgy (MIT) 3.40J Physical Metallurgy (MIT)

Description

This course examines how the presence of 1-, 2- and 3D defects and second phases control the mechanical, electromagnetic and chemical behavior of metals and alloys. It considers point, line and interfacial defects in the context of structural transformations including annealing, spinodal decomposition, nucleation, growth, and particle coarsening. In addition, it concentrates on structure-function relationships, and in particular how grain size, interstitial and substitutional solid solutions, and second-phase particles impact mechanical and other properties. Examples include microelectronic circuitry, magnetic memory and drug delivery applications. This course examines how the presence of 1-, 2- and 3D defects and second phases control the mechanical, electromagnetic and chemical behavior of metals and alloys. It considers point, line and interfacial defects in the context of structural transformations including annealing, spinodal decomposition, nucleation, growth, and particle coarsening. In addition, it concentrates on structure-function relationships, and in particular how grain size, interstitial and substitutional solid solutions, and second-phase particles impact mechanical and other properties. Examples include microelectronic circuitry, magnetic memory and drug delivery applications.

Subjects

1- | 2- and 3D defects | 1- | 2- and 3D defects | second phases | second phases | mechanical | electromagnetic and chemical behavior of metals and alloys | mechanical | electromagnetic and chemical behavior of metals and alloys | point | line and interfacial defects | point | line and interfacial defects | structural transformations | structural transformations | annealing | annealing | spinodal decomposition | spinodal decomposition | nucleation | nucleation | growth | growth | particle coarsening | particle coarsening | structure-function relationships | structure-function relationships | grain size | grain size | interstitial and substitutional solid solutions | interstitial and substitutional solid solutions | second-phase particles | second-phase particles | microelectronic circuitry | microelectronic circuitry | magnetic memory | magnetic memory | drug delivery applications | drug delivery applications | 3.40 | 3.40 | 22.71 | 22.71

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3.14 Physical Metallurgy (MIT) 3.14 Physical Metallurgy (MIT)

Description

The central point of this course is to provide a physical basis that links the structure of metals with their properties. With this understanding in hand, the concepts of alloy design and microstructural engineering are also discussed, linking processing and thermodynamics to the structure and properties of metals. The central point of this course is to provide a physical basis that links the structure of metals with their properties. With this understanding in hand, the concepts of alloy design and microstructural engineering are also discussed, linking processing and thermodynamics to the structure and properties of metals.

Subjects

processing | structure | and properties of metals and alloys | processing | structure | and properties of metals and alloys | strength | stiffness | and ductility | strength | stiffness | and ductility | crystallography | defects | microstructure | crystallography | defects | microstructure | phase transformations | phase transformations | microstructural evolution | microstructural evolution | alloy thermodynamics and kinetics | alloy thermodynamics and kinetics | structural engineering alloys | structural engineering alloys | steel | steel | aluminum | aluminum

License

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8.512 Theory of Solids II (MIT) 8.512 Theory of Solids II (MIT)

Description

This is the second term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include linear response theory; the physics of disorder; superconductivity; the local moment and itinerant magnetism; the Kondo problem and Fermi liquid theory. This is the second term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include linear response theory; the physics of disorder; superconductivity; the local moment and itinerant magnetism; the Kondo problem and Fermi liquid theory.

Subjects

Linear response theory | Linear response theory | Fluctuation dissipation theorem | Fluctuation dissipation theorem | Scattering experiment | Scattering experiment | f-sum rule | f-sum rule | Physics of disorder | Physics of disorder | Kubo formula for conductivity | Kubo formula for conductivity | Conductance and sensitivity to boundary conditions | Conductance and sensitivity to boundary conditions | Scaling theory of localization | Scaling theory of localization | Mott variable range hopping | Mott variable range hopping | Superconductor | Superconductor | Transverse response | Transverse response | Landau diamagnetism | Landau diamagnetism | Microscopic derivation of London equation | Microscopic derivation of London equation | Effect of disorder | Effect of disorder | Quasiparticles and coherence factors | Quasiparticles and coherence factors | Tunneling and Josephson effect | Tunneling and Josephson effect | Magnetism | Magnetism | Local moment magnetism | Local moment magnetism | exchange interaction | exchange interaction | Ferro- and anti-ferro magnet and spin wave theory | Ferro- and anti-ferro magnet and spin wave theory | Band magnetism | Band magnetism | Stoner theory | Stoner theory | spin density wave | spin density wave | Local moment in metals | Local moment in metals | Friedel sum rule | Friedel sum rule | Friedel-Anderson model | Friedel-Anderson model | Kondo problem | Kondo problem | Fermi liquid theory | Fermi liquid theory | Electron Green?s function | Electron Green?s function

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3.082 Materials Processing Laboratory (MIT) 3.082 Materials Processing Laboratory (MIT)

Description

Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using appropriate processing technologies (injection molding, thermoforming, investment casting, powder processing, brazing, etc.). Emphasis on teamwork, project management, communications and computer skills, and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Goals include developing an understanding of the practical applications of MSE; trade-offs between design, processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided. Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using appropriate processing technologies (injection molding, thermoforming, investment casting, powder processing, brazing, etc.). Emphasis on teamwork, project management, communications and computer skills, and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Goals include developing an understanding of the practical applications of MSE; trade-offs between design, processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided.

Subjects

investment casting of metals | investment casting of metals | injection molding of polymers | injection molding of polymers | sintering of ceramics | sintering of ceramics | operating processing equipment | operating processing equipment | materials engineering project management | materials engineering project management

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3.22 Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.22 Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course explores the phenomenology of mechanical behavior of materials at the macroscopic level and the relationship of mechanical behavior to material structure and mechanisms of deformation and failure. Topics covered include elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, creep, fracture, and fatigue. Case studies and examples are drawn from structural and functional applications that include a variety of material classes: metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, composites, and cellular materials. This course explores the phenomenology of mechanical behavior of materials at the macroscopic level and the relationship of mechanical behavior to material structure and mechanisms of deformation and failure. Topics covered include elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, creep, fracture, and fatigue. Case studies and examples are drawn from structural and functional applications that include a variety of material classes: metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, composites, and cellular materials.

Subjects

metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | bonding | bonding | structure | structure | energy band | energy band | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | optical detectors | sensors | sensors | thin films | thin films | biomaterials | biomaterials | cellular materials | cellular materials

License

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3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

Electrical, optical, magnetic, and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and polymers. Discussion of roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band, and microstructure), and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties. Case studies drawn from a variety of applications including semiconductor diodes, optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites, and cellular materials. Electrical, optical, magnetic, and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and polymers. Discussion of roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band, and microstructure), and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties. Case studies drawn from a variety of applications including semiconductor diodes, optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites, and cellular materials.

Subjects

metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | bonding | bonding | energy band | energy band | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | optical detectors | sensors | sensors | thin films | thin films | biomaterials | biomaterials | cellular materials | cellular materials

License

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8.231 Physics of Solids I (MIT) 8.231 Physics of Solids I (MIT)

Description

The topics covered in this course include:Periodic Structure and Symmetry of CrystalsDiffraction, Reciprocal LatticeChemical BondingLattice DynamicsPhononsThermal PropertiesFree Electron GasModel of MetalsBloch Theorem and Band StructureNearly Free Electron ApproximationTight Binding MethodFermi SurfaceSemiconductorsElectronsHolesImpuritiesOptical PropertiesExcitons andMagnetism The topics covered in this course include:Periodic Structure and Symmetry of CrystalsDiffraction, Reciprocal LatticeChemical BondingLattice DynamicsPhononsThermal PropertiesFree Electron GasModel of MetalsBloch Theorem and Band StructureNearly Free Electron ApproximationTight Binding MethodFermi SurfaceSemiconductorsElectronsHolesImpuritiesOptical PropertiesExcitons andMagnetism

Subjects

periodic structure and symmetry of crystals | periodic structure and symmetry of crystals | diffraction | diffraction | reciprocal lattice | reciprocal lattice | chemical bonding | chemical bonding | phonons | phonons | thermal properties | thermal properties | free electron gas | free electron gas | model of metals | model of metals | Bloch theorem and band structure | Bloch theorem and band structure | nearly free electron approximation | nearly free electron approximation | tight binding method | tight binding method | Fermi surface | Fermi surface | semiconductors | semiconductors | electrons | electrons | holes | holes | impurities | impurities | optical properties | optical properties | excitons | excitons | magnetism | magnetism

License

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1.76 Aquatic Chemistry (MIT) 1.76 Aquatic Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course details the quantitative treatment of chemical processes in aquatic systems such as lakes, oceans, rivers, estuaries, groundwaters, and wastewaters. It includes a brief review of chemical thermodynamics that is followed by discussion of acid-base, precipitation-dissolution, coordination, and reduction-oxidation reactions. Emphasis is on equilibrium calculations as a tool for understanding the variables that govern the chemical composition of aquatic systems and the fate of inorganic pollutants. This course is offered through The MIT/WHOI Joint Program. The MIT/WHOI Joint Program is one of the premier marine science graduate programs in the world. It draws on the complementary strengths and approaches of two great institutions: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) an This course details the quantitative treatment of chemical processes in aquatic systems such as lakes, oceans, rivers, estuaries, groundwaters, and wastewaters. It includes a brief review of chemical thermodynamics that is followed by discussion of acid-base, precipitation-dissolution, coordination, and reduction-oxidation reactions. Emphasis is on equilibrium calculations as a tool for understanding the variables that govern the chemical composition of aquatic systems and the fate of inorganic pollutants. This course is offered through The MIT/WHOI Joint Program. The MIT/WHOI Joint Program is one of the premier marine science graduate programs in the world. It draws on the complementary strengths and approaches of two great institutions: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) an

Subjects

water | water | aquatic | aquatic | seawater | seawater | carbonate | carbonate | trace metals | trace metals | woods hole | woods hole | acid-base | acid-base | complexation | complexation | precipitation-dissolution | precipitation-dissolution | reduction-oxidation | reduction-oxidation | chemical kinetics | chemical kinetics | equilibrium composition | equilibrium composition | approximation techniques | approximation techniques

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3.40J Physical Metallurgy (MIT) 3.40J Physical Metallurgy (MIT)

Description

The central point of this course is to provide a physical basis that links the structure of materials with their properties, focusing primarily on metals. With this understanding in hand, the concepts of alloy design and microstructural engineering are also discussed, linking processing and thermodynamics to the structure and properties of metals. The central point of this course is to provide a physical basis that links the structure of materials with their properties, focusing primarily on metals. With this understanding in hand, the concepts of alloy design and microstructural engineering are also discussed, linking processing and thermodynamics to the structure and properties of metals.

Subjects

point | point | line and interfacial defects | line and interfacial defects | stereographic projection | stereographic projection | annealing | annealing | spinodal decomposition | spinodal decomposition | nucleation | nucleation | growth | growth | particle coarsening | particle coarsening | structure-function relationships | structure-function relationships | interstitial and substitutional solid solutions | interstitial and substitutional solid solutions | processing and structure of metals | processing and structure of metals | strength | strength | stiffness | stiffness | and ductility | and ductility | crystallography | crystallography | phase transformations | phase transformations | microstructural evolution | microstructural evolution | steel | steel | aluminum | aluminum

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3.22 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT) 3.22 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, fracture and fatigue of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. We will cover special topics in mechanical behavior for material systems of your choice, with reference to current research and publications. Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, fracture and fatigue of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. We will cover special topics in mechanical behavior for material systems of your choice, with reference to current research and publications.

Subjects

Phenomenology | Phenomenology | mechanical behavior | mechanical behavior | material structure | material structure | deformation | deformation | failure | failure | elasticity | elasticity | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | plasticity | creep | creep | fracture | fracture | fatigue | fatigue | metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | thin films | thin films | carbon nanotubes | carbon nanotubes | battery materials | battery materials | superelastic alloys | superelastic alloys | defect nucleation | defect nucleation | student projects | student projects | viral capsides | viral capsides

License

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3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others. This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others.

Subjects

metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | bonding | bonding | structure | structure | energy band | energy band | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | optical detectors | sensors | sensors | thin films | thin films | biomaterials | biomaterials | cellular materials | cellular materials | magnetism | magnetism | polarity | polarity | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | plasticity | fracture | fracture | materials selection | materials selection

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3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT) 3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to the interactions between cells and the surfaces of biomaterials. The course covers: surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers, and ceramics; surface characterization methodology; modification of biomaterials surfaces; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture; biosensors and microarrays; bulk properties of implants; and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. General topics include biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. This class provides an introduction to the interactions between cells and the surfaces of biomaterials. The course covers: surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers, and ceramics; surface characterization methodology; modification of biomaterials surfaces; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture; biosensors and microarrays; bulk properties of implants; and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. General topics include biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

Subjects

interactions between proteins | cells and surfaces of biomaterials | interactions between proteins | cells and surfaces of biomaterials | surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture | Quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture | Organ replacement therapies | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT) 3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091. This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | materials of nature | objects of material culture | objects of material culture | glass | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | metals | Mesoamerica | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | materials development | ancient glass | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | rubber processing | materials processing | materials processing | materials engineering | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | pre-modern technology | ceramics | ceramics | fibers | fibers | ideology | ideology | values | values | anthropology | anthropology | archaeology | archaeology | history | history | culture | culture

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3.11 Mechanics of Materials (MIT) 3.11 Mechanics of Materials (MIT)

Description

Overview of mechanical properties of ceramics, metals, and polymers, emphasizing the role of processing and microstructure in controlling these properties. Basic topics in mechanics of materials including: continuum stress and strain, truss forces, torsion of a circular shaft and beam bending. Design of engineering structures from a materials point of view. Overview of mechanical properties of ceramics, metals, and polymers, emphasizing the role of processing and microstructure in controlling these properties. Basic topics in mechanics of materials including: continuum stress and strain, truss forces, torsion of a circular shaft and beam bending. Design of engineering structures from a materials point of view.

Subjects

beam bending | beam bending | circular shaft bending | circular shaft bending | truss forces | truss forces | continuum stress and strain | continuum stress and strain | polymers | polymers | metals | metals | ceramics | ceramics

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3.35 Fracture and Fatigue (MIT) 3.35 Fracture and Fatigue (MIT)

Description

Investigation of linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Topics include microstructural effects on fracture in metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, biological materials and composites, toughening mechanisms, crack growth resistance and creep fracture. Also covered: interface fracture mechanics, fatigue damage and dislocation substructures in single crystals, stress- and strain-life approach to fatigue, fatigue crack growth models and mechanisms, variable amplitude fatigue, corrosion fatigue and case studies of fracture and fatigue in structural, bioimplant, and microelectronic components. Investigation of linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Topics include microstructural effects on fracture in metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, biological materials and composites, toughening mechanisms, crack growth resistance and creep fracture. Also covered: interface fracture mechanics, fatigue damage and dislocation substructures in single crystals, stress- and strain-life approach to fatigue, fatigue crack growth models and mechanisms, variable amplitude fatigue, corrosion fatigue and case studies of fracture and fatigue in structural, bioimplant, and microelectronic components.

Subjects

Linear elastic | Linear elastic | elastic-plastic fracture mechanics | elastic-plastic fracture mechanics | Microstructural effects on fracture | Microstructural effects on fracture | Toughening mechanisms | Toughening mechanisms | Crack growth resistance | Crack growth resistance | creep fracture | creep fracture | Interface fracture mechanics | Interface fracture mechanics | Fatigue damage | Fatigue damage | dislocation substructures | dislocation substructures | Variable amplitude fatigue | Variable amplitude fatigue | Corrosion fatigue | Corrosion fatigue | experimental methods | experimental methods | microstructural effects | microstructural effects | metals | metals | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | thin films | thin films | biological materials | biological materials | composites | composites | single crystals | single crystals | stress-life | stress-life | strain-life | strain-life | structural components | structural components | bioimplant components | bioimplant components | microelectronic components | microelectronic components | case studies | case studies

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8.512 Theory of Solids II (MIT) 8.512 Theory of Solids II (MIT)

Description

This is the second term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include linear response theory; the physics of disorder; superconductivity; the local moment and itinerant magnetism; the Kondo problem and Fermi liquid theory. This is the second term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include linear response theory; the physics of disorder; superconductivity; the local moment and itinerant magnetism; the Kondo problem and Fermi liquid theory.

Subjects

Linear response theory | Linear response theory | Fluctuation dissipation theorem | Fluctuation dissipation theorem | Scattering experiment | Scattering experiment | f-sum rule | f-sum rule | Physics of disorder | Physics of disorder | Kubo formula for conductivity | Kubo formula for conductivity | Conductance and sensitivity to boundary conditions | Conductance and sensitivity to boundary conditions | Scaling theory of localization | Scaling theory of localization | Mott variable range hopping | Mott variable range hopping | Superconductor | Superconductor | Transverse response | Transverse response | Landau diamagnetism | Landau diamagnetism | Microscopic derivation of London equation | Microscopic derivation of London equation | Effect of disorder | Effect of disorder | Quasiparticles and coherence factors | Quasiparticles and coherence factors | Tunneling and Josephson effect | Tunneling and Josephson effect | Magnetism | Magnetism | Local moment magnetism | Local moment magnetism | exchange interaction | exchange interaction | Ferro- and anti-ferro magnet and spin wave theory | Ferro- and anti-ferro magnet and spin wave theory | Band magnetism | Band magnetism | Stoner theory | Stoner theory | spin density wave | spin density wave | Local moment in metals | Local moment in metals | Friedel sum rule | Friedel sum rule | Friedel-Anderson model | Friedel-Anderson model | Kondo problem | Kondo problem | Fermi liquid theory | Fermi liquid theory | Electron Green?s function | Electron Green?s function

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.231 Physics of Solids I (MIT) 8.231 Physics of Solids I (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to the basic concepts of the quantum theory of solids. This course offers an introduction to the basic concepts of the quantum theory of solids.

Subjects

periodic structure | periodic structure | symmetry of crystals | symmetry of crystals | diffraction | diffraction | reciprocal lattice | reciprocal lattice | chemical bonding | chemical bonding | lattice dynamics | lattice dynamics | phonons | phonons | thermal properties | thermal properties | free electron gas | free electron gas | model of metals | model of metals | Bloch theorem | Bloch theorem | band structure | band structure | nearly free electron approximation | nearly free electron approximation | tight binding method | tight binding method | Fermi surface | Fermi surface | semiconductors | semiconductors | electrons | electrons | holes | holes | impurities | impurities | optical properties | optical properties | excitons | excitons | magnetism. | magnetism.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.511 Theory of Solids I (MIT)

Description

This is the first term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include crystal structure and band theory, density functional theory, a survey of properties of metals and semiconductors, quantum Hall effect, phonons, electron phonon interaction and superconductivity.

Subjects

physics of solids | elementary excitations | symmetry | theory of representations | energy bands | excitons | critical points | response functions | interactions in the electron gas | electronic structure of metals | semimetals | semiconductors | insulators | Free electron model | Crystalline lattice | Debye Waller factor | Bravais lattice | Pseudopotential | van Hove singularity | Bloch oscillation | quantization of orbits | de Haas-van Alphen effect | Quantum Hall effect | Electron-electron interaction | Hartree-Fock approximation | Exchange energy for Jellium | Density functional theory | Hubbard model | Electron-phonon coupling | phonons

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Elements that make up the human body

Description

Introducing the periodic table of elements, and identifying the major elements involved in the human body and their roles.

Subjects

atoms | metals | non-metals | biochemistry | chemistry | foundation science | periodic table | Physical Sciences | Subjects allied to Medicine | Physical sciences | Subjects allied to medicine | F000 | B000

License

Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/

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ECorr: Introduction to Corrosion

Description

This case study gives a brief introduction to the subject of corrosion and helps in learning how to navigate and make use of the subsequent case studies. This is an introductory level case study.

Subjects

corrosion | engineering | metals | electrolyte | ph | zinc | near neutral solutions | passive metals | pourbaix diagrams | corrosion rate | corrosion products | stability | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The molecular world The molecular world

Description

From diamonds to dynamite, everything involves a chemical reaction. This free course, The molecular world, introduces you to the concepts and principles that underpin chemistry at the molecular level. Everyday experiences are used to help you to understand the more complex issues. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as The molecular world. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 From diamonds to dynamite, everything involves a chemical reaction. This free course, The molecular world, introduces you to the concepts and principles that underpin chemistry at the molecular level. Everyday experiences are used to help you to understand the more complex issues. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as The molecular world. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Chemistry | Chemistry | nucleus | nucleus | protons | protons | periodic table | periodic table | metals | metals | S205_2 | S205_2

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Subjects

Interactions between proteins | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Interactions between proteins | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | BE.340J | 3.051 | BE.340 | 20.340

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.511 Theory of Solids I (MIT)

Description

This is the first term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include crystal structure and band theory, density functional theory, a survey of properties of metals and semiconductors, quantum Hall effect, phonons, electron phonon interaction and superconductivity.

Subjects

physics of solids | elementary excitations | symmetry | theory of representations | energy bands | excitons | critical points | response functions | interactions in the electron gas | electronic structure of metals | semimetals | semiconductors | insulators | Free electron model | Crystalline lattice | Debye Waller factor | Bravais lattice | Pseudopotential | van Hove singularity | Bloch oscillation | quantization of orbits | de Haas-van Alphen effect | Quantum Hall effect | Electron-electron interaction | Hartree-Fock approximation | Exchange energy for Jellium | Density functional theory | Hubbard model | Electron-phonon coupling | phonons

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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