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21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT) 21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the

Subjects

Shakespeare | Shakespeare | English Renaissance | English Renaissance | Marlowe | Marlowe | Jonson | Jonson | Webster | Webster | Ford | Ford | English Renaissance drama | English Renaissance drama | the relationship between theatre and society | the relationship between theatre and society | culture | culture | aesthetic | aesthetic | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | money | trade | and colonialism | money | trade | and colonialism | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | allegory and aesthetic form | allegory and aesthetic form | theatricality and meta-theatricality | theatricality and meta-theatricality | the private and the public | the private and the public | allegory | allegory | aesthetic form | aesthetic form | drama | drama | gender dynamics | gender dynamics | class dynamics | class dynamics | private | private | public | public | theatrically | theatrically | meta-theatrically | meta-theatrically | money | money | trade | trade | colonialism | colonialism | body | body | metaphor | metaphor | theatre | theatre | society | society | Spanish tragedy | Spanish tragedy | Hamlet | Hamlet | Jew of Malta | Jew of Malta | Alchemist | Alchemist | Duchess of Malfi | Duchess of Malfi | Broken Heart | Broken Heart | Arden of Faversham | Arden of Faversham | Witch of Edmonton | Witch of Edmonton | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Island Princess | Island Princess

License

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4.131B Architectural Design, Level II: Material and Tectonic Transformations: The Herreshoff Museum (MIT) 4.131B Architectural Design, Level II: Material and Tectonic Transformations: The Herreshoff Museum (MIT)

Description

This semester students are asked to transform the Hereshoff Museum in Bristol, Rhode Island, through processes of erasure and addition. Hereshoff Manufacturing was recognized as one of the premier builders of America's Cup racing boats between 1890's and 1930's. The studio, however, is about more than the program. It is about land, water, and wind and the search for expressing materially and tectonically the relationships between these principle conditions. That is, where the land is primarily about stasis (docking, anchoring and referencing our locus), water's fluidity holds the latent promise of movement and freedom. Movement is activated by wind, allowing for negotiating the relationship between water and land. This semester students are asked to transform the Hereshoff Museum in Bristol, Rhode Island, through processes of erasure and addition. Hereshoff Manufacturing was recognized as one of the premier builders of America's Cup racing boats between 1890's and 1930's. The studio, however, is about more than the program. It is about land, water, and wind and the search for expressing materially and tectonically the relationships between these principle conditions. That is, where the land is primarily about stasis (docking, anchoring and referencing our locus), water's fluidity holds the latent promise of movement and freedom. Movement is activated by wind, allowing for negotiating the relationship between water and land.

Subjects

architecture | architecture | design | design | tectonics | tectonics | representation | representation | materials | materials | construction | construction | presentation | presentation | sketching | sketching | metaphor | metaphor | boat building | boat building | shipyard renovation | shipyard renovation | adaptive reuse | adaptive reuse | public and private space | public and private space | visual arts | visual arts | America's Cup | America's Cup | racing | racing | displacement | displacement | lightness | lightness | mass | mass | strength | strength | energy | energy | speed | speed | design studio | design studio | architectural design | architectural design | public space | public space | private space | private space | tectonic language | tectonic language | design process | design process | research | research | reading | reading | representing | representing | testing | testing

License

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Metaphor and Synesthesia: Some Considerations on Expressive Blending

Description

April Pierce, DPhil Researcher at St Anne's College, Oxford, gives a talk on Metaphor and Synesthesia, a neurological condition. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

mental health | metaphor | language | sensation | neurology | st annes | synesthesia | mental health | metaphor | language | sensation | neurology | st annes | synesthesia | 2012-04-10

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21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT) 21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT)

Description

"Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion, "Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion,

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | literary art | literary art | language | language | aethetic | aethetic | meaning | meaning | poetic drama | poetic drama | hymns | hymns | lyrics | lyrics | history | history | rhetoric | rhetoric | song | song | drama | drama | comedy | comedy | verse | verse | form | form | rhyme | rhyme | prose | prose | musical | musical | ambiguity | ambiguity | symbolism | symbolism | world | world | irony | irony | style | style | stylistic | stylistic | poetic diction | poetic diction | simile | simile | connections | connections | cultures | cultures | genres | genres | elements of poetry | elements of poetry | lines | lines | stanzas | stanzas | English love sonnets | English love sonnets | sound | sound | figuration | figuration | literary tradition | literary tradition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the

Subjects

Shakespeare | English Renaissance | Marlowe | Jonson | Webster | Ford | English Renaissance drama | the relationship between theatre and society | culture | aesthetic | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | money | trade | and colonialism | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | allegory and aesthetic form | theatricality and meta-theatricality | the private and the public | allegory | aesthetic form | drama | gender dynamics | class dynamics | private | public | theatrically | meta-theatrically | money | trade | colonialism | body | metaphor | theatre | society | Spanish tragedy | Hamlet | Jew of Malta | Alchemist | Duchess of Malfi | Broken Heart | Arden of Faversham | Witch of Edmonton | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Island Princess

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.017 The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability (MIT) 21L.017 The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability (MIT)

Description

"The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to): the attempt to quantify or otherwise explain the presence of chance, risk, and contingency in everyday life; the deduction of causes for phenomena that are knowable only in their effects; and, above all, the question of what it means to think and act rationally in an uncertain world. Our course "The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to): the attempt to quantify or otherwise explain the presence of chance, risk, and contingency in everyday life; the deduction of causes for phenomena that are knowable only in their effects; and, above all, the question of what it means to think and act rationally in an uncertain world. Our course

Subjects

philosophy | philosophy | scientific thought | scientific thought | scientific method | scientific method | mathematics | mathematics | chance | chance | risk | risk | statistics | statistics | history of science | history of science | quantitative measurement | quantitative measurement | chaos | chaos | uncertainty | uncertainty | induction | induction | deduction | deduction | inference | inference | luck | luck | gambling | gambling | cause and effect | cause and effect | games of chance | games of chance | fate | fate | prediction | prediction | rationality | rationality | decision making | decision making | religion | religion | randomness | randomness | knowledge | knowledge | fact | fact | human nature | human nature | mind | mind | senses | senses | intelligence | intelligence | metaphor | metaphor | Darwinism | Darwinism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT) 21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers. This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | Milton | Milton | Pope | Pope | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Keats | Keats | Yeats | Yeats | Eliot | Eliot | Larkin | Larkin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT) 21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject follows a course of readings in lyric poetry in the English language, tracing the main lines of descent through literary periods from the Renaissance to the modern period and concentrating mostly on English rather than American examples. This subject follows a course of readings in lyric poetry in the English language, tracing the main lines of descent through literary periods from the Renaissance to the modern period and concentrating mostly on English rather than American examples.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | Milton | Milton | Pope | Pope | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Keats | Keats | Yeats | Yeats | Eliot | Eliot | Larkin | Larkin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Interpreting Poetry (MIT) 21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Interpreting Poetry (MIT)

Description

This seminar offers a course of readings in lyric poetry. It aims to enhance the student's capacity to understand the nature of poetic language and the enjoyment of poetic texts by treating poems as messages to be deciphered. The seminar will briefly touch upon the history of theories of figurative language since Aristotle and it will attend to the development of those theories during the last thirty years, noting the manner in which they tended to consider figures of speech distinct from normative or literal expression, and it will devote particular attention to the rise of theories that quarrel with this distinction. The seminar also aims to communicate a rough sense of the history of English-speaking poetry since the early modern period. Some attention will be paid as well to the This seminar offers a course of readings in lyric poetry. It aims to enhance the student's capacity to understand the nature of poetic language and the enjoyment of poetic texts by treating poems as messages to be deciphered. The seminar will briefly touch upon the history of theories of figurative language since Aristotle and it will attend to the development of those theories during the last thirty years, noting the manner in which they tended to consider figures of speech distinct from normative or literal expression, and it will devote particular attention to the rise of theories that quarrel with this distinction. The seminar also aims to communicate a rough sense of the history of English-speaking poetry since the early modern period. Some attention will be paid as well to the

Subjects

literature | literature | lyric poetry | lyric poetry | poetic language | poetic language | figurative language | figurative language | Aristotle | Aristotle | literary theory | literary theory | history | history | early modern | early modern | metaphor | metaphor | science | science | renaissance | renaissance | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Donne | Donne | Marvell | Marvell | Milton | Milton | Romantic period | Romantic period | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Coleridge | Coleridge | Keats | Keats | early twentieth-century | early twentieth-century | Yeats | Yeats | T.S. Eliot | T.S. Eliot | Wallace Stevens | Wallace Stevens | Robert Frost | Robert Frost | Elizabeth Bishop | Elizabeth Bishop | Phillip Larkin | Phillip Larkin | poems | poems | normative | normative | literal | literal | literary criticism | literary criticism | critical method | critical method | interpretation | interpretation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.212 Myth, Ritual, and Symbolism (MIT) 21A.212 Myth, Ritual, and Symbolism (MIT)

Description

Human beings are symbol-making as well as tool-making animals. We understand our world and shape our lives in large part by assigning meanings to objects, beings, and persons; by connecting things together in symbolic patterns; and by creating elaborate forms of symbolic action and narrative. In this introductory subject we consider how symbols are created and structured; how they draw on and give meaning to different domains of the human world; how they are woven into politics, family life, and the life cycle; and how we can interpret them. The semester will be devoted to a number of topics in symbolism. Metaphor and Other Figurative Language The Raw Materials of Symbolism, especially Animals and The Human Body Cosmology and Complex Symbolic Systems Ritual, including Symbolic Curing Human beings are symbol-making as well as tool-making animals. We understand our world and shape our lives in large part by assigning meanings to objects, beings, and persons; by connecting things together in symbolic patterns; and by creating elaborate forms of symbolic action and narrative. In this introductory subject we consider how symbols are created and structured; how they draw on and give meaning to different domains of the human world; how they are woven into politics, family life, and the life cycle; and how we can interpret them. The semester will be devoted to a number of topics in symbolism. Metaphor and Other Figurative Language The Raw Materials of Symbolism, especially Animals and The Human Body Cosmology and Complex Symbolic Systems Ritual, including Symbolic Curing

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | myth | myth | ritual | ritual | symbolism | symbolism | animals | animals | symbolic system | symbolic system | meaning | meaning | life cycle | life cycle | metaphor | metaphor | figurative language | figurative language | human body | human body | cosmology | cosmology | magic | magic | narrative | narrative | mythology | mythology | patterns | patterns | culture | culture | sign | sign | tropes | tropes | classification | classification | interpretation | interpretation | folktale | folktale | power | power | passage | passage | persuasion | persuasion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.355J The Anthropology of Biology (MIT) 21A.355J The Anthropology of Biology (MIT)

Description

If the twentieth century was the century of physics, the twenty-first promises to be the century of biology. This subject examines the cultural, political, and economic dimensions of biology in the age of genomics, biotechnological enterprise, biodiversity conservation, pharmaceutical bioprospecting, and synthetic biology. Although we examine such social concerns as bioterrorism, genetic modification, and cloning, this is not a class in bioethics, but rather an anthropological inquiry into how the substances and explanations of biology — increasingly cellular, molecular, genetic, and informatic — are changing, and with them broader ideas about the relationship between "nature" and "culture." Looking at such cultural artifacts as cell lines, biodiversity databases, and artif If the twentieth century was the century of physics, the twenty-first promises to be the century of biology. This subject examines the cultural, political, and economic dimensions of biology in the age of genomics, biotechnological enterprise, biodiversity conservation, pharmaceutical bioprospecting, and synthetic biology. Although we examine such social concerns as bioterrorism, genetic modification, and cloning, this is not a class in bioethics, but rather an anthropological inquiry into how the substances and explanations of biology — increasingly cellular, molecular, genetic, and informatic — are changing, and with them broader ideas about the relationship between "nature" and "culture." Looking at such cultural artifacts as cell lines, biodiversity databases, and artif

Subjects

synthetic biology | synthetic biology | genetics | genetics | Charles Darwin | Charles Darwin | evolution | evolution | eugenics | eugenics | bioprospecting | bioprospecting | ethics | ethics | biodiversity | biodiversity | race | race | molecular biology | molecular biology | sociology of science | sociology of science | construction of identity | construction of identity | intersex | intersex | biotechnology | biotechnology | narratives and metaphors | narratives and metaphors

License

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1. Do Metaphors Have a Non-Literal Meaning?

Description

James Grant, Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Oxford, introduces some of the key concepts in discussions of metaphor in the philosophy of language. He then discusses Donald Davidson's very influential and very controversial paper, 'What Metaphors Mean'. Davidson argues that a metaphor means exactly what the words of the sentence mean when taken literally, and nothing more.

Subjects

philosophy | language | metaphor | davidson | philosophy of language | ukoer | philosophy | language | metaphor | davidson | philosophy of language

License

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2. What Gives Metaphors the Content They Have?

Description

James Grant, Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Oxford, discusses different theories about what gives metaphors the special meaning or content they have.

Subjects

philosophy | language | metaphor | davidson | philosophy of language | ukoer | philosophy | language | metaphor | davidson | philosophy of language

License

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3. Speaking in Metaphor and Paraphrasing Metaphor

Description

James Grant, Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Oxford, discusses the question of how we succeed in communicating to others with metaphor. He also examines the question of whether all metaphors can be paraphrased.

Subjects

philosophy | language | metaphor | philosophy of language | ukoer | philosophy | language | metaphor | philosophy of language

License

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4. Metaphor and Art

Description

James Grant, Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Oxford, discusses the use of metaphor to describe music and other artworks. He discusses Christopher Peacocke's views on the expression of emotion in music, as well as Roger Scruton's view that hearing music involves metaphor.

Subjects

philosophy | language | metaphor | philosophy of language | art. scruton | peacocke | ukoer | philosophy | language | metaphor | philosophy of language | art. scruton | peacocke

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MAS.961 Special Topics: Designing Sociable Media (MIT) MAS.961 Special Topics: Designing Sociable Media (MIT)

Description

This project-based course explores new design strategies for social interaction in the computer mediated world. Through weekly readings and design assignments we will examine topics such as: Data-based portraiture Depicting growth, change and the passage of time Visualizing conversations, crowds, and networks Interfaces for the connected city Mobile social technologies The course emphasizes developing visual and interactive literacy. This project-based course explores new design strategies for social interaction in the computer mediated world. Through weekly readings and design assignments we will examine topics such as: Data-based portraiture Depicting growth, change and the passage of time Visualizing conversations, crowds, and networks Interfaces for the connected city Mobile social technologies The course emphasizes developing visual and interactive literacy.

Subjects

online | online | online behavior | online behavior | internet | internet | interface | interface | interaction | interaction | cultural mores | cultural mores | social cues | social cues | virtual world | virtual world | on-line community | on-line community | social networking | social networking | storytelling | storytelling | persona | persona | web 2.0 | web 2.0 | email | email | IM | IM | cooperation | cooperation | marketing | marketing | surveillance | surveillance | creativity | creativity | connection | connection | conversation | conversation | mobility | mobility | web design | web design | conceptual metaphor | conceptual metaphor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.840 At the Limit: Violence in Contemporary Representation (MIT) CMS.840 At the Limit: Violence in Contemporary Representation (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on novels and films from the last twenty-five years (nominally 1985–2010) marked by their relationship to extreme violence and transgression. Our texts will focus on serial killers, torture, rape, and brutality, but they also explore notions of American history, gender and sexuality, and reality television—sometimes, they delve into love or time or the redemptive role of art in late modernity. Our works are a motley assortment, with origins in the U.S., France, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Japan and South Korea. The broad global era marked by this period is one of acceleration, fragmentation, and late capitalism; however, we will also consider national specificities of violent representation, including particulars like the history of racism in the United States, This course focuses on novels and films from the last twenty-five years (nominally 1985–2010) marked by their relationship to extreme violence and transgression. Our texts will focus on serial killers, torture, rape, and brutality, but they also explore notions of American history, gender and sexuality, and reality television—sometimes, they delve into love or time or the redemptive role of art in late modernity. Our works are a motley assortment, with origins in the U.S., France, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Japan and South Korea. The broad global era marked by this period is one of acceleration, fragmentation, and late capitalism; however, we will also consider national specificities of violent representation, including particulars like the history of racism in the United States,

Subjects

violence | violence | serial | serial | killer | killer | psycho | psycho | masculinity | masculinity | white | white | sex | sex | rape | rape | assault | assault | underclass | underclass | boredom | boredom | repetition | repetition | America | America | Ellis | Ellis | Palahniuk | Palahniuk | fight | fight | club | club | Cooper | Cooper | frisk | frisk | Sontag | Sontag | pain | pain | ultraviolence | ultraviolence | squib | squib | metaphor | metaphor | Fargo | Fargo | Coen | Coen | Benjamin | Benjamin | commodities | commodities | blankness | blankness | beast | beast | Manson | Manson | portraits | portraits | signs | signs | Henry | Henry | Se7en | Se7en | Pitt | Pitt | Fincher | Fincher | desire | desire | fragmentation | fragmentation | television | television | TV | TV | reality | reality | culpability | culpability | Bazin | Bazin | Resevoir | Resevoir | Tarantino | Tarantino | postmodern | postmodern | gore | gore | cartoon | cartoon | humor | humor | Oldboy | Oldboy | Haneke | Haneke

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Ballet

Description

This learning package contains teacher notes; a set of 10 online tasks; a complete resource list; and some suggestions for classroom activities. The online tasks contain approximately 10 hours of materials for independent and collaborative learning. They include: reflective questions with feedback, recommended readings and viewings, links to video clips, online discussion forums and creative mind maps.

Subjects

ballet | somatic approach | opposition | alignmnent | battement tendu | musicality | verticality | metaphors | dance | creativity | CCCEED | JISC digitisation and content

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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MAS.961 Special Topics: Designing Sociable Media (MIT)

Description

This project-based course explores new design strategies for social interaction in the computer mediated world. Through weekly readings and design assignments we will examine topics such as: Data-based portraiture Depicting growth, change and the passage of time Visualizing conversations, crowds, and networks Interfaces for the connected city Mobile social technologies The course emphasizes developing visual and interactive literacy.

Subjects

online | online behavior | internet | interface | interaction | cultural mores | social cues | virtual world | on-line community | social networking | storytelling | persona | web 2.0 | email | IM | cooperation | marketing | surveillance | creativity | connection | conversation | mobility | web design | conceptual metaphor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Using Stories and Metaphor to Think Creatively - Learning Package

Description

A learning activity about how metaphors and stories are used in personal and organizational life

Subjects

emloyability | stories | metaphors | personal learning | work learning | ukoer | administrative studies | N000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Using Stories and Metaphor to Think Creatively - Raw Materials

Description

The raw materials for a learning activity about how metaphors and stories are used in personal and organizational life

Subjects

employability | stories | metaphors | work | work learning | working life | personal learning | ukoer | administrative studies | N000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT)

Description

"Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion,

Subjects

Literature | poetry | poets | English | Renaissance | modern | Shakespeare | sonnets | stanza-form | figurative language | metaphor | metonymy | meter | accent | duration | apostrophe | assonance | enjambment | chiasmus | hyperbole | litotes | Donne | metaphysical | literary art | language | aethetic | meaning | poetic drama | hymns | lyrics | history | rhetoric | song | drama | comedy | verse | form | rhyme | prose | musical | ambiguity | symbolism | world | irony | style | stylistic | poetic diction | simile | connections | cultures | genres | elements of poetry | lines | stanzas | English love sonnets | sound | figuration | literary tradition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.017 The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability (MIT)

Description

"The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to): the attempt to quantify or otherwise explain the presence of chance, risk, and contingency in everyday life; the deduction of causes for phenomena that are knowable only in their effects; and, above all, the question of what it means to think and act rationally in an uncertain world. Our course

Subjects

philosophy | scientific thought | scientific method | mathematics | chance | risk | statistics | history of science | quantitative measurement | chaos | uncertainty | induction | deduction | inference | luck | gambling | cause and effect | games of chance | fate | prediction | rationality | decision making | religion | randomness | knowledge | fact | human nature | mind | senses | intelligence | metaphor | Darwinism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Metaphor - Mini Lecture

Description

A mini-lecture that will introduce you to the concept of metaphor and some key terms. It will then examine the importance of metaphor in our personal lives and in organizational life, providing you with some examples.

Subjects

metaphor | stories | creativity | employability | ukoer | administrative studies | N000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Stories - Mini Lecture

Description

A mini-lecture that will introduce you to the concept of stories. It will then examine the importance of metaphor in our personal lives and in organizational life, providing you with some examples.

Subjects

stories | metaphor | creativity | employability | ukoer | administrative studies | N000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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