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7.342 Cancer Biology: From Basic Research to the Clinic (MIT) 7.342 Cancer Biology: From Basic Research to the Clinic (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. In 1971, President Nixon declared the "War on Cancer," but after three decades the war is still raging. How much progress have we made toward winning the war and what are we doing to improve the fight? Understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in tumor formation, progression, and metastasis is crucial to the development of innovative therapy for cancer patients. Insights into these processes have been gleaned through basic research using biochemical, molecular, and genetic ana This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. In 1971, President Nixon declared the "War on Cancer," but after three decades the war is still raging. How much progress have we made toward winning the war and what are we doing to improve the fight? Understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in tumor formation, progression, and metastasis is crucial to the development of innovative therapy for cancer patients. Insights into these processes have been gleaned through basic research using biochemical, molecular, and genetic ana

Subjects

cancer | cancer | tumor | tumor | metastasis | metastasis | genetic analysis | genetic analysis | cancer biology | cancer biology | model organisms | model organisms | genetic pathways | genetic pathways | uncontrolled growth | uncontrolled growth | tumor suppressor genes | tumor suppressor genes | oncogenes | oncogenes | tumor initiation | tumor initiation | cell cycle | cell cycle | chromosomal aberration | chromosomal aberration | apoptosis | apoptosis | cell death | cell death | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | proto-oncogene | proto-oncogene | mutation | mutation | DNA mismatch repair | DNA mismatch repair | telomeres | telomeres | mouse models | mouse models | tissue specificity | tissue specificity | malignancy | malignancy | stem cells | stem cells | therapeutic resistance | therapeutic resistance | differentiation | differentiation | caner research | caner research | cancer therapeutics | cancer therapeutics | chemotherapy | chemotherapy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The lymphatic system in immunity and cancer

Description

Professor David Jackson tells us about the role of the lymphatic system in immunity and cancer. The lymphatic system is a network of vessels collecting the fluids leaked from the blood vasculature. Its filtering function makes it an ideal compartment for the immune system. It is also a pipeline for metastasizing tumour cells to spread to distant tissues. Professor David Jackson studies how leukocytes and tumour cells enter the lymphatic vessels from the surrounding tissues. Professor Jackson's research has the potential to help us better control the spread of tumours, block unwanted immune responses in autoimmune diseases, block tissue rejection and make vaccines more effective. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

lymph node | tumour | immunology | cancer | metastasis | lymphatic system | lymph node | tumour | immunology | cancer | metastasis | lymphatic system

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The lymphatic system in immunity and cancer

Description

Professor David Jackson tells us about the role of the lymphatic system in immunity and cancer. The lymphatic system is a network of vessels collecting the fluids leaked from the blood vasculature. Its filtering function makes it an ideal compartment for the immune system. It is also a pipeline for metastasizing tumour cells to spread to distant tissues. Professor David Jackson studies how leukocytes and tumour cells enter the lymphatic vessels from the surrounding tissues. Professor Jackson's research has the potential to help us better control the spread of tumours, block unwanted immune responses in autoimmune diseases, block tissue rejection and make vaccines more effective. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

lymph node | tumour | immunology | cancer | metastasis | lymphatic system | lymph node | tumour | immunology | cancer | metastasis | lymphatic system

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/video.xml

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7.343 When Development Goes Awry: How Cancer Co-opts Mechanisms of Embryogensis (MIT) 7.343 When Development Goes Awry: How Cancer Co-opts Mechanisms of Embryogensis (MIT)

Description

During this course, we will study the similarities between cancer and normal development to understand how tumors co-opt normal developmental processes to facilitate cancer initiation, maintenance and progression. We will examine critical signaling pathways that govern these processes and, importantly, how some of these pathways hold promise as therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. We will discuss how future treatments might be personalized to target cancer cells in specific patients. We will also consider examples of newly-approved drugs that have dramatically helped patients combat this devastating disease. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary res During this course, we will study the similarities between cancer and normal development to understand how tumors co-opt normal developmental processes to facilitate cancer initiation, maintenance and progression. We will examine critical signaling pathways that govern these processes and, importantly, how some of these pathways hold promise as therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. We will discuss how future treatments might be personalized to target cancer cells in specific patients. We will also consider examples of newly-approved drugs that have dramatically helped patients combat this devastating disease. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary res

Subjects

cancer | cancer | embryogenesis | embryogenesis | sonic hedgehog | sonic hedgehog | tumor | tumor | signaling | signaling | proto-oncogene | proto-oncogene | Kras | Kras | apoptosis | apoptosis | self-renewal | self-renewal | regeneration | regeneration | angiogenesis | angiogenesis | VEGF | VEGF | tumorigenesis | tumorigenesis | metastasis | metastasis | microRNA | microRNA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Angiogenesis and Metastasis in Cancer

Description

The resource below is a series of Powerpoint slides (and a list of further reading) on the cellular and molecular basis of angiogenesis and metastasis in cancer. It gives a short overview of the basic organisation of blood vessels and how tuours agrow and spread by stimulating new blood vessel growth and metastic transformation, highlighting the signalling pathways involved in these processes. These slides were created by Dr. Momna Hejmadi as part of her course to first and second year undergraduates in the biosciences. This source file can be adapted for educational and non-commercial purposes only as licensed under the Creative Commons licence.

Subjects

bioukoer | angiogenesis | metastasis | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.343 When Development Goes Awry: How Cancer Co-opts Mechanisms of Embryogensis (MIT)

Description

During this course, we will study the similarities between cancer and normal development to understand how tumors co-opt normal developmental processes to facilitate cancer initiation, maintenance and progression. We will examine critical signaling pathways that govern these processes and, importantly, how some of these pathways hold promise as therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. We will discuss how future treatments might be personalized to target cancer cells in specific patients. We will also consider examples of newly-approved drugs that have dramatically helped patients combat this devastating disease. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary res

Subjects

cancer | embryogenesis | sonic hedgehog | tumor | signaling | proto-oncogene | Kras | apoptosis | self-renewal | regeneration | angiogenesis | VEGF | tumorigenesis | metastasis | microRNA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

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7.342 Cancer Biology: From Basic Research to the Clinic (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. In 1971, President Nixon declared the "War on Cancer," but after three decades the war is still raging. How much progress have we made toward winning the war and what are we doing to improve the fight? Understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in tumor formation, progression, and metastasis is crucial to the development of innovative therapy for cancer patients. Insights into these processes have been gleaned through basic research using biochemical, molecular, and genetic ana

Subjects

cancer | tumor | metastasis | genetic analysis | cancer biology | model organisms | genetic pathways | uncontrolled growth | tumor suppressor genes | oncogenes | tumor initiation | cell cycle | chromosomal aberration | apoptosis | cell death | signal transduction pathways | proto-oncogene | mutation | DNA mismatch repair | telomeres | mouse models | tissue specificity | malignancy | stem cells | therapeutic resistance | differentiation | caner research | cancer therapeutics | chemotherapy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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