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12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT) 12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT)

Description

This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist. This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist.

Subjects

meteorology | meteorology | climate | climate | oceanography | oceanography | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | mass | mass | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | Vorticity | Vorticity | divergence Scaling | divergence Scaling | geostrophic approximation | geostrophic approximation | Ekman layers | Ekman layers | Vortex motion | Vortex motion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Invention of Clouds

Description

Writer Richard Hamblyn revisits his first book about the 19th-century amateur meteorologist Luke Howard who gave the clouds the names we use today. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

meteorology | climate | weather | clouds | meteorology | climate | weather | clouds | 2012-12-04

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT) STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists, This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | computers | history | history | digital | digital | scientific instrument | scientific instrument | applied science | applied science | meteorology | meteorology | nuclear physics | nuclear physics | logic | logic | mathematics | mathematics | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | biochemistry | aerospace | aerospace | medicine | medicine | supercomputing | supercomputing | distributed computing | distributed computing | linguistics | linguistics | humanities | humanities | hypertext | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.S56 GPS: Where Are You? (MIT) 12.S56 GPS: Where Are You? (MIT)

Description

This is a freshman advising seminar. The professor of a FAS is the first year advisor to the (no more than 8) students in the seminar. The use of Global Positioning System (GPS) in a wide variety of applications has exploded in the last few years. In this seminar we explore how positions on the Earth were determined before GPS; how GPS itself works and the range of applications in which GPS is now a critical element. This seminar is followed by a UROP research project in the spring semester where results from precise GPS measurements will be analyzed and displayed on the Web. This is a freshman advising seminar. The professor of a FAS is the first year advisor to the (no more than 8) students in the seminar. The use of Global Positioning System (GPS) in a wide variety of applications has exploded in the last few years. In this seminar we explore how positions on the Earth were determined before GPS; how GPS itself works and the range of applications in which GPS is now a critical element. This seminar is followed by a UROP research project in the spring semester where results from precise GPS measurements will be analyzed and displayed on the Web.

Subjects

GPS | GPS | global positioning system | global positioning system | navigation | navigation | meteorology | meteorology | geophysics | geophysics | military | military

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.S56 GPS: Civilian Tool or Military Weapon? (MIT) 12.S56 GPS: Civilian Tool or Military Weapon? (MIT)

Description

This is a freshman advising seminar (FAS). The professor of a FAS is the first year advisor to the (no more than 8) students in the seminar.The use of Global Positioning System (GPS) in a wide variety of applications has exploded in the last few years. In this seminar we will explore how GPS works, the range of applications, and the conflict between civilian users and military planners. This seminar is followed by an Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) research project in the spring semester where results from precise GPS measurements will be analyzed and displayed on the Web. This is a freshman advising seminar (FAS). The professor of a FAS is the first year advisor to the (no more than 8) students in the seminar.The use of Global Positioning System (GPS) in a wide variety of applications has exploded in the last few years. In this seminar we will explore how GPS works, the range of applications, and the conflict between civilian users and military planners. This seminar is followed by an Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) research project in the spring semester where results from precise GPS measurements will be analyzed and displayed on the Web.

Subjects

GPS | GPS | global positioning system | global positioning system | navigation | navigation | meteorology | meteorology | geophysics | geophysics | military | military

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT) 12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT)

Description

This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. File decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site. This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. File decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site.

Subjects

meteorology | meteorology | climate | climate | oceanography | oceanography | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | mass | mass | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | Vorticity | Vorticity | divergence Scaling | divergence Scaling | geostrophic approximation | geostrophic approximation | Ekman layers | Ekman layers | Vortex motion | Vortex motion | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | atmospheric science | atmospheric science | physical oceanography | physical oceanography | ocean engineering | ocean engineering | oceans | oceans | fluid flow | fluid flow | conservation equations | conservation equations | vortex flows | vortex flows | circulation | circulation | Earth | Earth | rotation | rotation | GFD kinematics | GFD kinematics | waves | waves | Eulerian kinematics | Eulerian kinematics | Lagrangian kinematics | Lagrangian kinematics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.810 Dynamics of the Atmosphere (MIT) 12.810 Dynamics of the Atmosphere (MIT)

Description

This course begins with a study of the role of dynamics in the general physics of the atmosphere, the consideration of the differences between modeling and approximation, and the observed large-scale phenomenology of the atmosphere. Only then are the basic equations derived in rigorous manner. The equations are then applied to important problems and methodologies in meteorology and climate, with discussions of the history of the topics where appropriate. Problems include the Hadley circulation and its role in the general circulation, atmospheric waves including gravity and Rossby waves and their interaction with the mean flow, with specific applications to the stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation, tides, the super-rotation of Venus' atmosphere, the generation of atmospheric turbulence This course begins with a study of the role of dynamics in the general physics of the atmosphere, the consideration of the differences between modeling and approximation, and the observed large-scale phenomenology of the atmosphere. Only then are the basic equations derived in rigorous manner. The equations are then applied to important problems and methodologies in meteorology and climate, with discussions of the history of the topics where appropriate. Problems include the Hadley circulation and its role in the general circulation, atmospheric waves including gravity and Rossby waves and their interaction with the mean flow, with specific applications to the stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation, tides, the super-rotation of Venus' atmosphere, the generation of atmospheric turbulence

Subjects

atmosphere | atmosphere | meteorology | meteorology | climate | climate | Hadley circulation | Hadley circulation | general circulation | general circulation | atmospheric waves | atmospheric waves | Rossby waves | Rossby waves | stationary waves | stationary waves | atmospheric turbulence | atmospheric turbulence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.693 Principles of Oceanographic Instrument Systems -- Sensors and Measurements (13.998) (MIT) 2.693 Principles of Oceanographic Instrument Systems -- Sensors and Measurements (13.998) (MIT)

Description

This course introduces theoretical and practical principles of design of oceanographic sensor systems. Topics include: transducer characteristics for acoustic, current, temperature, pressure, electric, magnetic, gravity, salinity, velocity, heat flow, and optical devices; limitations on these devices imposed by ocean environments; signal conditioning and recording; noise, sensitivity, and sampling limitations; and standards. Lectures by experts cover the principles of state-of-the-art systems being used in physical oceanography, geophysics, submersibles, acoustics. For lab work, day cruises in local waters allow students to prepare, deploy and analyze observations from standard oceanographic instruments. This course introduces theoretical and practical principles of design of oceanographic sensor systems. Topics include: transducer characteristics for acoustic, current, temperature, pressure, electric, magnetic, gravity, salinity, velocity, heat flow, and optical devices; limitations on these devices imposed by ocean environments; signal conditioning and recording; noise, sensitivity, and sampling limitations; and standards. Lectures by experts cover the principles of state-of-the-art systems being used in physical oceanography, geophysics, submersibles, acoustics. For lab work, day cruises in local waters allow students to prepare, deploy and analyze observations from standard oceanographic instruments.

Subjects

Oceanography | Oceanography | monitoring | monitoring | instrumentation | instrumentation | experiment | experiment | sampling | sampling | transducer | transducer | meteorology | meteorology | calibration | calibration | noise | noise | ocean | ocean | water | water | sea water | sea water | telemetry | telemetry | data recorder | data recorder | satellite | satellite | current | current | salinity | salinity | pressure | pressure | corrosion | corrosion | underwater | underwater

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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UCL Galton Collection Teaching Pack

Description

The Victorian scientist Sir Francis Galton (1822-1911) bequeathed a collection of objects to University College London on his death in 1911. These objects, which include Galton’s personal affects, custom-made objects used in his research and objects from the Galton Laboratory now compose the UCL Galton Collection. This resource has been compiled to showcase some of the objects in this collection and to list the subjects represented, which could be used in teaching. This resource has been created as part of the JISC funded project Object Based Learning for Higher Education (OBL4HE) - a project to create a range of online educational resources for university teachers and students based around the use of museum collections and archival material for enhancing learning. To search for more of

Subjects

Galton | biostatistics | human genetics | meteorology | anthropometrics | eugenics | craniometer | death masks | phrenology | quincunx | criminology | crime science | museum | OBL4HE

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Watching the weather

Description

This free course describes how meteorological observations are made looking upwards from the surface of the Earth

Subjects

Environmental Studies | weather | meteorology | space | atmosphere | S189_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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2.693 Principles of Oceanographic Instrument Systems -- Sensors and Measurements (13.998) (MIT)

Description

This course introduces theoretical and practical principles of design of oceanographic sensor systems. Topics include: transducer characteristics for acoustic, current, temperature, pressure, electric, magnetic, gravity, salinity, velocity, heat flow, and optical devices; limitations on these devices imposed by ocean environments; signal conditioning and recording; noise, sensitivity, and sampling limitations; and standards. Lectures by experts cover the principles of state-of-the-art systems being used in physical oceanography, geophysics, submersibles, acoustics. For lab work, day cruises in local waters allow students to prepare, deploy and analyze observations from standard oceanographic instruments.

Subjects

Oceanography | monitoring | instrumentation | experiment | sampling | transducer | meteorology | calibration | noise | ocean | water | sea water | telemetry | data recorder | satellite | current | salinity | pressure | corrosion | underwater

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.S56 GPS: Civilian Tool or Military Weapon? (MIT)

Description

This is a freshman advising seminar (FAS). The professor of a FAS is the first year advisor to the (no more than 8) students in the seminar.The use of Global Positioning System (GPS) in a wide variety of applications has exploded in the last few years. In this seminar we will explore how GPS works, the range of applications, and the conflict between civilian users and military planners. This seminar is followed by an Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) research project in the spring semester where results from precise GPS measurements will be analyzed and displayed on the Web.

Subjects

GPS | global positioning system | navigation | meteorology | geophysics | military

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT)

Description

This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. File decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site.

Subjects

meteorology | climate | oceanography | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | mass | momentum | energy | Vorticity | divergence Scaling | geostrophic approximation | Ekman layers | Vortex motion | fluid dynamics | atmospheric science | physical oceanography | ocean engineering | oceans | fluid flow | conservation equations | vortex flows | circulation | Earth | rotation | GFD kinematics | waves | Eulerian kinematics | Lagrangian kinematics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Weather Data: a guide to finding information

Description

Using the library to find sources relating to weather data.

Subjects

weather data meteorology climatology

License

copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License. copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.

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12.S56 GPS: Where Are You? (MIT)

Description

This is a freshman advising seminar. The professor of a FAS is the first year advisor to the (no more than 8) students in the seminar. The use of Global Positioning System (GPS) in a wide variety of applications has exploded in the last few years. In this seminar we explore how positions on the Earth were determined before GPS; how GPS itself works and the range of applications in which GPS is now a critical element. This seminar is followed by a UROP research project in the spring semester where results from precise GPS measurements will be analyzed and displayed on the Web.

Subjects

GPS | global positioning system | navigation | meteorology | geophysics | military

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Watching the weather

Description

This free course describes how meteorological observations are made looking upwards from the surface of the Earth looking downwards from satellites in space and from aircraft and balloons within the atmosphere. This international network of observations is vital for scientists and forecasters and the results impact on everyones daily activities.

Subjects

Environmental Science | weather | meteorology | space | atmosphere | S189_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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12.810 Dynamics of the Atmosphere (MIT)

Description

This course begins with a study of the role of dynamics in the general physics of the atmosphere, the consideration of the differences between modeling and approximation, and the observed large-scale phenomenology of the atmosphere. Only then are the basic equations derived in rigorous manner. The equations are then applied to important problems and methodologies in meteorology and climate, with discussions of the history of the topics where appropriate. Problems include the Hadley circulation and its role in the general circulation, atmospheric waves including gravity and Rossby waves and their interaction with the mean flow, with specific applications to the stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation, tides, the super-rotation of Venus' atmosphere, the generation of atmospheric turbulence

Subjects

atmosphere | meteorology | climate | Hadley circulation | general circulation | atmospheric waves | Rossby waves | stationary waves | atmospheric turbulence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Watching the weather

Description

This free course, Watching the weather, describes how meteorological observations are made looking upwards from the surface of the Earth, looking downwards from satellites in space and from aircraft and balloons within the atmosphere. This international network of observations is vital for scientists and forecasters and the results impact on everyones daily activities. First published on Thu, 07 Sep 2017 as Watching the weather. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2017

Subjects

Environmental Studies | weather | meteorology | space | atmosphere | S189_1

License

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT)

Description

This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist.

Subjects

meteorology | climate | oceanography | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | mass | momentum | energy | Vorticity | divergence Scaling | geostrophic approximation | Ekman layers | Vortex motion

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