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11.203 Microeconomics (MIT) 11.203 Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Microeconomics (11.203) is a course that runs for the first two-thirds of the semester. It is designed for incoming city planning students with little or no economics background. Incoming students take a voluntary microeconomics test-out at the beginning of the semester. Those that pass the test-out are exempt from taking Microeconomics.Planning Economics (11.202) is a course that runs for one-third of a semester and covers economics topics of particular interest to city planning students: location theory, the interplay between externalities and zoning, international trade and globalization, and housing finance. Few incoming students have had prior exposure to these topics.To minimize disruption, Planning Economics is positioned as the last third of a semester long core course on Planning Microeconomics (11.203) is a course that runs for the first two-thirds of the semester. It is designed for incoming city planning students with little or no economics background. Incoming students take a voluntary microeconomics test-out at the beginning of the semester. Those that pass the test-out are exempt from taking Microeconomics.Planning Economics (11.202) is a course that runs for one-third of a semester and covers economics topics of particular interest to city planning students: location theory, the interplay between externalities and zoning, international trade and globalization, and housing finance. Few incoming students have had prior exposure to these topics.To minimize disruption, Planning Economics is positioned as the last third of a semester long core course on Planning

Subjects

microeconomics | microeconomics | markets | markets | profit | profit | standard of living | standard of living | economics for planners | economics for planners | income distribution | income distribution | economic analysis | economic analysis | deregulation | deregulation | profit maximization | profit maximization | oligopoly | oligopoly | monopoly | monopoly | tragedy of the commons | tragedy of the commons

License

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14.123 Microeconomic Theory III (MIT) 14.123 Microeconomic Theory III (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course discusses decision theory and topics in game theory. We present models of individual decision-making under certainty and uncertainty. Topics include preference orderings, expected utility, risk, stochastic dominance, supermodularity, monotone comparative statics, background risk, game theory, rationalizability, iterated strict dominance multi-stage games, sequential equilibrium, trembling-hand perfection, stability, signaling games, theory of auctions, global games, repeated games, and correlation. This half-semester course discusses decision theory and topics in game theory. We present models of individual decision-making under certainty and uncertainty. Topics include preference orderings, expected utility, risk, stochastic dominance, supermodularity, monotone comparative statics, background risk, game theory, rationalizability, iterated strict dominance multi-stage games, sequential equilibrium, trembling-hand perfection, stability, signaling games, theory of auctions, global games, repeated games, and correlation.

Subjects

microeconomics | microeconomics | microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | preference | preference | utility representation | utility representation | expected utility | expected utility | positive interpretation | positive interpretation | normative interpretation | normative interpretation | risk | risk | stochastic dominance | stochastic dominance | insurance | insurance | finance | finance | supermodularity | supermodularity | comparative statics | comparative statics | decision theory | decision theory | game theory | game theory | rationalizability | rationalizability | iterated strict dominance | iterated strict dominance | iterated conditional dominance | iterated conditional dominance | bargaining | bargaining | equilibrium | equilibrium | sequential equilibrium | sequential equilibrium | trembling-hand perfection | trembling-hand perfection | signaling games | signaling games | auctions | auctions | global games | global games | repeated games | repeated games | correlation | correlation

License

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14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT) 14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment. This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment.

Subjects

labor Economics | labor Economics | public policy | public policy | applied microeconomics | applied microeconomics | empirical analysis | empirical analysis | labor supply and demand | labor supply and demand | taxes and transfers | taxes and transfers | human capital | human capital | minimum wages | minimum wages | income distribution | income distribution | unions and strikes | unions and strikes | immigration | immigration | incentives | incentives | discrimination | discrimination | unemployment and unemployment insurance | unemployment and unemployment insurance | bargaining | bargaining | economics of the family | economics of the family | decision to work | decision to work | home production | home production | monpsony | monpsony | education | education | training | training

License

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11.203 Microeconomics for Planners (MIT) 11.203 Microeconomics for Planners (MIT)

Description

Microeconomics for Planners, 11.203, will ground you in basic microeconomics - how markets function, how to think about allocating scarce resources, what profit maximizing behavior means in different kinds of markets, how technology and trade reshapes all of this, etc. Along the way, it will also give you a sense of several of the major economic issues in the presidential campaign. We will consider activities that markets don’t directly capture - the value of an historic preservation district or the costs imposed by pollution - in November and December during Gateway: Planning Economics, 11.202. Microeconomics for Planners, 11.203, will ground you in basic microeconomics - how markets function, how to think about allocating scarce resources, what profit maximizing behavior means in different kinds of markets, how technology and trade reshapes all of this, etc. Along the way, it will also give you a sense of several of the major economic issues in the presidential campaign. We will consider activities that markets don’t directly capture - the value of an historic preservation district or the costs imposed by pollution - in November and December during Gateway: Planning Economics, 11.202.

Subjects

microeconomics | microeconomics | markets | markets | profit | profit | standard of living | standard of living | economics for planners | economics for planners | income distribution | income distribution | economic analysis | economic analysis | deregulation | deregulation | profit maximization | profit maximization | oligopoly; monopoly | oligopoly; monopoly | tragedy of the commons | tragedy of the commons | oligopoly | oligopoly | monopoly | monopoly

License

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges. This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | market | optimization | optimization | allocation | allocation | economic measurement | economic measurement | analysis | analysis | microeconomics | microeconomics | demand | demand | supply | supply | equilibrium | equilibrium | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | consumer preference | consumer preference | utility functions | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | budget constraints | interior solutions | interior solutions | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | Engle curves | individual demand | individual demand | market demand | market demand | revealed preferences | revealed preferences | substitution effect | substitution effect | income effect | income effect | Giffen goods | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | Irish potato famine | network externalities | network externalities | uncertainty | uncertainty | preference toward risk | preference toward risk | risk premium | risk premium | indifference curves | indifference curves | diversification | diversification | insurance | insurance | producer theory | producer theory | production functions | production functions | short run | short run | long run | long run | returns to scale | returns to scale | cost functions | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scale | economies of scope | economies of scope | learning | learning | profit maximization | profit maximization | producer surplus | producer surplus | agricultural price support | agricultural price support | tax | tax | subsidy | subsidy | exchange economy | exchange economy | contract curves | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | efficiency | monopoly | monopoly | multiplant firm | multiplant firm | social cost | social cost | price regulation | price regulation | monopsony | monopsony | price discrimination | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | two-part tariffs | bundling | bundling | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | game theory | game theory | oligopoly | oligopoly | Cournot | Cournot | Stackelberg | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

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11.203 Microeconomics (MIT) 11.203 Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Microeconomics will ground you in - surprise - basic microeconomics-how markets function, how to think about allocating scarce resources among competing uses, what profit maximizing behavior means in industries with different numbers of competitors, how technology and trade reshapes the opportunities people face, and so on. We will apply economic ideas to understand current economic problems, including the housing bubble, the current unemployment situation (particularly for high school gradutes), how Google makes its money and why healthcare costs are rising so fast. Microeconomics will ground you in - surprise - basic microeconomics-how markets function, how to think about allocating scarce resources among competing uses, what profit maximizing behavior means in industries with different numbers of competitors, how technology and trade reshapes the opportunities people face, and so on. We will apply economic ideas to understand current economic problems, including the housing bubble, the current unemployment situation (particularly for high school gradutes), how Google makes its money and why healthcare costs are rising so fast.

Subjects

microeconomics | microeconomics | markets | markets | economy | economy | competition | competition | economic development | economic development | supply and demand | supply and demand | oligopoly | oligopoly

License

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Advanced Topics (MIT) Advanced Topics (MIT)

Description

This course presents some of the major concepts, principles, analytical methods and tools useful for making investment and finance decisions regarding commercial real estate assets. As the second in a two-course sequence, this course focuses on more advanced topics and the "macro" level, which pertains to decisions about collections of many individual real estate assets, that is, portfolio or firm level decisions and investment management considerations. (More fundamental "micro" level analysis, pertaining to individual properties and deals, is covered in 11.431 taught in the fall semester).This course also introduces and surveys the major public capital market real estate vehicles, REITs and MBS. Other topics treated include a selection among such subjects as real opti This course presents some of the major concepts, principles, analytical methods and tools useful for making investment and finance decisions regarding commercial real estate assets. As the second in a two-course sequence, this course focuses on more advanced topics and the "macro" level, which pertains to decisions about collections of many individual real estate assets, that is, portfolio or firm level decisions and investment management considerations. (More fundamental "micro" level analysis, pertaining to individual properties and deals, is covered in 11.431 taught in the fall semester).This course also introduces and surveys the major public capital market real estate vehicles, REITs and MBS. Other topics treated include a selection among such subjects as real opti

Subjects

investment | investment | finance | finance | commercial real estate | commercial real estate | microeconomics | microeconomics | REIT | REIT | MBS | MBS | real options | real options | land valuation | land valuation | development project financial analysis | corporate real estate | development project financial analysis | corporate real estate | development project financial analysis | development project financial analysis | corporate real estate | corporate real estate | capital structure | capital structure | portfolio strategy | portfolio strategy | equilibrium pricing of asset classes | equilibrium pricing of asset classes | investment performance measurement | investment performance measurement | benchmarking | benchmarking | investment management | investment management | international real estate investing | international real estate investing | 11.432 | 11.432 | 15.427 | 15.427

License

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11.942 Regional Energy-Environmental Economic Modeling (MIT) 11.942 Regional Energy-Environmental Economic Modeling (MIT)

Description

This subject is on regional energy-environmental modeling rather than on general energy-environmental policies, but the models should have some policy relevance. We will start with some discussion of green accounting issues; then, we will cover a variety of theoretical and empirical topics related to spatial energy demand and supply, energy forecasts, national and regional energy prices, and environmental implications of regional energy consumption and production. Where feasible, the topics will have a spatial dimension. This is a new seminar, so we expect students to contribute material to the set of readings and topics covered during the semester. This subject is on regional energy-environmental modeling rather than on general energy-environmental policies, but the models should have some policy relevance. We will start with some discussion of green accounting issues; then, we will cover a variety of theoretical and empirical topics related to spatial energy demand and supply, energy forecasts, national and regional energy prices, and environmental implications of regional energy consumption and production. Where feasible, the topics will have a spatial dimension. This is a new seminar, so we expect students to contribute material to the set of readings and topics covered during the semester.

Subjects

regional energy environmental modeling | regional energy environmental modeling | policies | policies | microeconomics | microeconomics | economic modeling | economic modeling | economic modeling techniques | economic modeling techniques | input-output | input-output | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | linear programming | linear programming | logit | logit | regression | regression | green accounting | green accounting | spatial energy demand | spatial energy demand | spatial energy supply | spatial energy supply | energy forecast | energy forecast | regional energy prices | regional energy prices | regional energy consumption | regional energy consumption | regional energy production | regional energy production

License

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

In this course students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. In this course students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states | ESD.284J | ESD.284J | 11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.284 | ESD.284 | 11.418 | 11.418 | ESD.192 | ESD.192

License

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Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

This class surveys theories of regional growth, factor mobility, clustering, industrial restructuring, learning regions, and global supply chains from a political-economy perspective. It examines and critiques accounting frameworks including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. It will assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. This class surveys theories of regional growth, factor mobility, clustering, industrial restructuring, learning regions, and global supply chains from a political-economy perspective. It examines and critiques accounting frameworks including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. It will assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states

License

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

Students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of US and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. Students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of US and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states | 11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.284 | ESD.284

License

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14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT) 14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

The course is an introduction to the field of Labor Economics, with an eye to helping students think critically about research and public policy. The emphasis is on applied microeconomics and empirical analysis. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, human capital, minimum wages, income distribution, unions and strikes, immigration, incentives, discrimination, unemployment and unemployment insurance. The course is an introduction to the field of Labor Economics, with an eye to helping students think critically about research and public policy. The emphasis is on applied microeconomics and empirical analysis. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, human capital, minimum wages, income distribution, unions and strikes, immigration, incentives, discrimination, unemployment and unemployment insurance.

Subjects

Labor Economics | Labor Economics | public policy | public policy | applied microeconomics | applied microeconomics | empirical analysis | empirical analysis | labor supply and demand | labor supply and demand | taxes and transfers | taxes and transfers | human capital | human capital | minimum wages | minimum wages | income distribution | income distribution | unions and strikes | unions and strikes | immigration | immigration | incentives | incentives | discrimination | discrimination | unemployment and unemployment insurance | unemployment and unemployment insurance

License

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15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT) 15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT)

Description

The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments. The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments.

Subjects

applied economics | applied economics | resource scarcity | resource scarcity | allocate limited resources | allocate limited resources | business choices | business choices | modeling consumer choices | modeling consumer choices | market efficiency | market efficiency | microeconomics | microeconomics | efficiency | efficiency | supply | supply | demand | demand | consumer theory | consumer theory | producer theory | producer theory | monopoly | monopoly | imperfect competition | imperfect competition | pricing | pricing | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | information uncertainty | information uncertainty | group decision making | group decision making | organizational architecture | organizational architecture | international trade | international trade | equity | equity | income distribution | income distribution | economic rewards | economic rewards | managerial economics | managerial economics | corporate finance theory | corporate finance theory | network economy | network economy

License

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14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

The course is an introduction to the field of Labor Economics, with an eye to helping students think critically about research and public policy. The emphasis is on applied microeconomics and empirical analysis. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, human capital, minimum wages, income distribution, unions and strikes, immigration, incentives, discrimination, unemployment and unemployment insurance.

Subjects

Labor Economics | public policy | applied microeconomics | empirical analysis | labor supply and demand | taxes and transfers | human capital | minimum wages | income distribution | unions and strikes | immigration | incentives | discrimination | unemployment and unemployment insurance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment.

Subjects

labor Economics | public policy | applied microeconomics | empirical analysis | labor supply and demand | taxes and transfers | human capital | minimum wages | income distribution | unions and strikes | immigration | incentives | discrimination | unemployment and unemployment insurance | bargaining | economics of the family | decision to work | home production | monpsony | education | training

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Principles of Microeconomics

Description

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a basic understanding of the principles of microeconomics. At its core, the study of economics deals with the choices and decisions that have to be made in order to manage scarce resources available to us. Microeconomics is the branch of economics that pertains to decisions made at the individual level, i.e. by individual consumers or individual firms, after evaluating resources, costs, and tradeoffs. "The economy" refers to the marketplace or system in which these choices interact with one another. In this course, the student will learn how and why these decisions are made and how they affect one another in the economy. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning out

Subjects

microeconomics | economics | supply | demand | equilibrium | market | elasticity | maximizing | consumer | producer | competitive | non-competitive | imperfect | resource | capital | labor | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Intermediate Microeconomics

Description

This course is designed to extend the student’s knowledge of the basic microeconomic principles that will provide the foundation for their future work in economics and give them insight into how economic models can help us think about important real world phenomena. Topics include supply and demand interaction, utility maximization, profit maximization, elasticity, perfect competition, monopoly power, imperfect competition, and game theory. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Economics 201)

Subjects

microeconomics | trade | economics | externalities | producer | theory | investment | consumer | competition | auctions | costs | dynamics | equilibrium | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | optimization | allocation | economic measurement | analysis | microeconomics | demand | supply | equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer preference | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | interior solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | individual demand | market demand | revealed preferences | substitution effect | income effect | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | network externalities | uncertainty | preference toward risk | risk premium | indifference curves | diversification | insurance | producer theory | production functions | short run | long run | returns to scale | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scope | learning | profit maximization | producer surplus | agricultural price support | tax | subsidy | exchange economy | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | monopoly | multiplant firm | social cost | price regulation | monopsony | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | bundling | monopolistic competition | game theory | oligopoly | Cournot | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Principles of Microeconomics

Description

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a basic understanding of the principles of microeconomics. At its core, the study of economics deals with the choices and decisions that have to be made in order to manage scarce resources available to us. Microeconomics is the branch of economics that pertains to decisions made at the individual level, i.e. by individual consumers or individual firms, after evaluating resources, costs, and tradeoffs. "The economy" refers to the marketplace or system in which these choices interact with one another. In this course, the student will learn how and why these decisions are made and how they affect one another in the economy. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning out

Subjects

microeconomics | economics | supply | demand | equilibrium | market | elasticity | maximizing | consumer | producer | competitive | non-competitive | imperfect | resource | capital | labor | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Intermediate Microeconomics

Description

This course is designed to extend the student’s knowledge of the basic microeconomic principles that will provide the foundation for their future work in economics and give them insight into how economic models can help us think about important real world phenomena. Topics include supply and demand interaction, utility maximization, profit maximization, elasticity, perfect competition, monopoly power, imperfect competition, and game theory. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Economics 201)

Subjects

microeconomics | trade | economics | externalities | producer | theory | investment | consumer | competition | auctions | costs | dynamics | equilibrium | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT)

Description

The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments.

Subjects

applied economics | resource scarcity | allocate limited resources | business choices | modeling consumer choices | market efficiency | microeconomics | efficiency | supply | demand | consumer theory | producer theory | monopoly | imperfect competition | pricing | public goods | externalities | information uncertainty | group decision making | organizational architecture | international trade | equity | income distribution | economic rewards | managerial economics | corporate finance theory | network economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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F391 11 Market operations and the Scottish economy

Description

This Unit is intended to introduce students to basic ideas in economics. It is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of economics. The Unit will enable students to apply a number of economic concepts to market situations and to explore aspects of the Scottish economy. It covers elements of microeconomics and macroeconomics and, therefore, provides a foundation for future study in economics.

Subjects

F39111 | TranSETT | microeconomics | macroeconomics | economic systems | Scotland | EB : Economics | SCQF Level 5

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Scotland's Colleges / SQA Scotland's Colleges / SQA

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14.03 Microeconomic Theory and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This course applies microeconomic theory to analysis of public policy. It builds from the microeconomic model of consumer behavior and extends to operation of single and multiple markets and analysis of why markets sometimes fail. We will study empirical examples to evaluate theory, focusing on the casual effects of policy interventions on economic outcomes. Topics include minimum wages and employment, food stamps and consumer welfare, economics of risk and safety regulation, the value of education, and gains from international trade.

Subjects

microeconomics | public policy | consumer behavior | markets | minimum wage | employment | welfare | regulation | education | international trade

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Economics explains discrimination in the labour market

Description

Discrimination in the labour market exists in many forms: the ‘glass ceiling’ ageism, racism, etc. This unit will help you look at this problem with a new perspective: through economics. You will learn how economists have tried to understand what drives this distortion of the labour market and why women and the ethnic minorities seem to suffer the most.

Subjects

society | disadvantage | discrimination | economics | economic_theory | economists | labour_market | microeconomics | segmentation | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Introduction to Microeconomics

Description

/introduction-to-microeconomics-1 This course is designed to help you build an understanding of the economics of the market place. In particular we focus on microeconomic principles that demonstrate the role and limitations of both competitive and imperfectly competitive markets in motivating socially efficient consumer, business, and public sector choices.

Subjects

microeconomics | economics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/

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