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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT) 3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electron | electronic properties | electronic properties | magnetism | magnetism | magentic properties | magentic properties | structure | structure | crystal | crystal | lattice | lattice | energy | energy | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | phonon | quantum | quantum | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | radiation | radiation | battery | battery | fuel cell | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | polymer | polymer | glass | glass | corrosion | corrosion

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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT) 3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electron | electronic properties | electronic properties | magnetism | magnetism | magentic properties | magentic properties | structure | structure | crystal | crystal | lattice | lattice | energy | energy | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | phonon | quantum | quantum | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | radiation | radiation | battery | battery | fuel cell | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | polymer | polymer | glass | glass | corrosion | corrosion

License

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9.123 Neurotechnology in Action (MIT) 9.123 Neurotechnology in Action (MIT)

Description

This course, as a part of MIT's Center for Neurobiological Engineering curriculum, explores cutting-edge neurotechnology that is essential for advances in all aspects of neuroscience, including improvements in existing methods as well as the development, testing and discussion of completely new paradigms. Readings and in-class sessions cover the fields of electrophysiology, light microscopy, cellular engineering, optogenetics, electron microscopy, MRI / fMRI, and MEG / EEG. The course is designed with lectures that cover the background, context, and theoretical descriptions of neurotechnologies, and labs, which provide firsthand demonstrations as well as in situ lab tours. This course, as a part of MIT's Center for Neurobiological Engineering curriculum, explores cutting-edge neurotechnology that is essential for advances in all aspects of neuroscience, including improvements in existing methods as well as the development, testing and discussion of completely new paradigms. Readings and in-class sessions cover the fields of electrophysiology, light microscopy, cellular engineering, optogenetics, electron microscopy, MRI / fMRI, and MEG / EEG. The course is designed with lectures that cover the background, context, and theoretical descriptions of neurotechnologies, and labs, which provide firsthand demonstrations as well as in situ lab tours.

Subjects

Neurotechnology | Neurotechnology | neuron | neuron | electrophysiology | electrophysiology | light microscopy | light microscopy | cellular engineering | cellular engineering | optogenetics | optogenetics | electron microscopy | electron microscopy | MRI/fMRI | MRI/fMRI | functional MRI | functional MRI | MEG/EEG | MEG/EEG

License

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Microscopy with light and electrons

Description

This is a third edition of the Electron Microscopy and Analysis textbook, which was published by Taylor and Francis Books UK in 2001 (ISBN 0748409688). It deals with several sophisticated techniques for magnifying images of very small objects by large amounts - especially in a physical science context. Consisting of seven chapters, presented as separate files the resource incorporates questions and answers in each chapter for ease of learning. Equally as relevant for material scientists and bioscientists, this resource is an essential textbook and laboratory manual. The chapter gives the basic principles of microscopy.

Subjects

electron microscopy | book | analysis | confocal microscopy | scanned probe microscopies | spm | stm | afm | field ion microscopy | fim | stem | atom probe | apfim | sims | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/

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Electron microscopy and other techniques

Description

This is a third edition of the Electron Microscopy and Analysis textbook, which was published by Taylor and Francis Books UK in 2001 (ISBN 0748409688). It deals with several sophisticated techniques for magnifying images of very small objects by large amounts - especially in a physical science context. Consisting of seven chapters, presented as separate files the resource incorporates questions and answers in each chapter for ease of learning. Equally as relevant for material scientists and bioscientists, this resource is an essential textbook and laboratory manual. The chapter gives the comparison of electron microscopy with other imaging and analysis techniques.

Subjects

electron microscopy | book | analysis | confocal microscopy | scanned probe microscopies | spm | stm | afm | field ion microscopy | fim | stem | atom probe | apfim | sims | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/

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TALAT Lecture 1202: Metallography of Aluminium Alloys

Description

This lecture aims at providing a survey of the metallographic techniques available for the examination of aluminium and its alloys. The information must be sufficient to be sure that the students and the users are able to choose the most suitable technique to solve their problems in the examination of samples. The lecture should contain a direct understanding of the main problems in the metallography of the different classes of aluminium materials.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | EAA | Training in Aluminium Application Technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | metallography | sample preparation | grinding | polishing | etching | anodising | electropolishing | dimpling | ion milling | polarised light | electron channelling | interference contrast | high resolution electron microscopy | SEM | TEM | HREM | HVEM | optical microscopy | high voltage electron microscopy | commercial purity | wrought alloys | foundry alloys | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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TALAT Lecture 1202: Metallography of Aluminium Alloys

Description

This lecture aims at providing a survey of the metallographic techniques available for the examination of aluminium and its alloys. The information must be sufficient to be sure that the students and the users are able to choose the most suitable technique to solve their problems in the examination of samples. The lecture should contain a direct understanding of the main problems in the metallography of the different classes of aluminium materials.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | eaa | talat | training in aluminium application technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | metallography | sample preparation | grinding | polishing | etching | anodising | electropolishing | dimpling | ion milling | polarised light | electron channelling | interference contrast | high resolution electron microscopy | sem | tem | hrem | hvem | optical microscopy | high voltage electron microscopy | commercial purity | wrought alloys | foundry alloys | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.341 Brightening up Life: Harnessing the Power of Fluorescence Imaging to Observe Biology in Action (MIT) 7.341 Brightening up Life: Harnessing the Power of Fluorescence Imaging to Observe Biology in Action (MIT)

Description

One summer in the 1960s a young Japanese researcher, with the help of a few high school students, chopped up ten thousand jellyfish. As a by-product of this harvest, they isolated a green fluorescent protein (GFP). Since then, GFP has triggered a revolution in our understanding of gene expression and signaling in live cells. In this seminar, we will examine how this small protein generates fluorescence, i.e. absorbs light of one wavelength and emits light of a longer wavelength. We will discuss how the color palette has been extended from green to blue, red and many other colors, based on protein engineering of GFP and the study of vividly colorful coral reefs. We will then investigate how these fluorescent proteins can be used to track the motion of DNA, RNA and protein in living cells, a One summer in the 1960s a young Japanese researcher, with the help of a few high school students, chopped up ten thousand jellyfish. As a by-product of this harvest, they isolated a green fluorescent protein (GFP). Since then, GFP has triggered a revolution in our understanding of gene expression and signaling in live cells. In this seminar, we will examine how this small protein generates fluorescence, i.e. absorbs light of one wavelength and emits light of a longer wavelength. We will discuss how the color palette has been extended from green to blue, red and many other colors, based on protein engineering of GFP and the study of vividly colorful coral reefs. We will then investigate how these fluorescent proteins can be used to track the motion of DNA, RNA and protein in living cells, a

Subjects

Green Fluorescent Protein | Green Fluorescent Protein | Fluorescent protein engineering | Fluorescent protein engineering | Photoconversion | Photoconversion | fluorescent protein variants | fluorescent protein variants | fluorescent microscopy facility | fluorescent microscopy facility | Quantitative fluorescent imaging | Quantitative fluorescent imaging | ultra-sensitive fluorescent imaging | ultra-sensitive fluorescent imaging | high-throughput analysis | high-throughput analysis | Fluorescent imaging in living organisms | Fluorescent imaging in living organisms | phycoerythrin | phycoerythrin | phytochrome | phytochrome | jellyfish | jellyfish | red fluorescent protein | red fluorescent protein | photoactivation | photoactivation | chromophore | chromophore | protonation | protonation | lysosomes | lysosomes | recombinant protein molecules | recombinant protein molecules

License

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7.340 Nano-life: An Introduction to Virus Structure and Assembly (MIT) 7.340 Nano-life: An Introduction to Virus Structure and Assembly (MIT)

Description

Watson and Crick noted that the size of a viral genome was insufficient to encode a protein large enough to encapsidate it and reasoned, therefore that a virus shell must be composed of multiple, but identical subunits. Today, high resolution structures of virus capsids reveal the basis of this genetic economy as a highly symmetrical structure, much like a geodesic dome composed of protein subunits. Crystallographic structures and cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions combined with molecular data are beginning to reveal how these nano-structures are built. Topics covered in the course will include basic principles of virus structure and symmetry, capsid assembly, strategies for enclosing nucleic acid, proteins involved in entry and exit, and the life cycles of well understood pathogens Watson and Crick noted that the size of a viral genome was insufficient to encode a protein large enough to encapsidate it and reasoned, therefore that a virus shell must be composed of multiple, but identical subunits. Today, high resolution structures of virus capsids reveal the basis of this genetic economy as a highly symmetrical structure, much like a geodesic dome composed of protein subunits. Crystallographic structures and cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions combined with molecular data are beginning to reveal how these nano-structures are built. Topics covered in the course will include basic principles of virus structure and symmetry, capsid assembly, strategies for enclosing nucleic acid, proteins involved in entry and exit, and the life cycles of well understood pathogens

Subjects

viruses | viruses | virus structure | virus structure | virus assembly | virus assembly | virus shell | virus shell | virus genome | virus genome | capsids | capsids | capsid assembly | capsid assembly | TEM | TEM | transmission electron microscopy | transmission electron microscopy | nano-life | nano-life | nano-structures | nano-structures | virus symmetry | virus symmetry | icosahedral virus | icosahedral virus | electron cryotomography | electron cryotomography | nucleic acid packaging | nucleic acid packaging

License

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3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT) 3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th

Subjects

Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | stress-strain relationships | stress-strain relationships | stress transformation | stress transformation | elasticity | elasticity | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | bubble raft models | bubble raft models | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | plasticity and fracture | plasticity and fracture | Case studies | Case studies | materials selection | materials selection | bicycle frames | bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants | stress shielding in biomedical implants | residual stresses in thin films | residual stresses in thin films | ancient materials | ancient materials | standard mechanical tests | standard mechanical tests | solid mechanics | solid mechanics | mechanical behavior of materials | mechanical behavior of materials

License

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22.058 Principles of Medical Imaging (MIT) 22.058 Principles of Medical Imaging (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging and its applications. It includes a series of lectures with a parallel set of recitations that provide demonstrations of basic principles. Both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation are covered, including x-ray, PET, MRI, and ultrasound. Emphasis on the physics and engineering of image formation. An introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging and its applications. It includes a series of lectures with a parallel set of recitations that provide demonstrations of basic principles. Both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation are covered, including x-ray, PET, MRI, and ultrasound. Emphasis on the physics and engineering of image formation.

Subjects

general imaging principles | | general imaging principles | | linear optics | | linear optics | | ray tracing | | ray tracing | | Linear Imaging Systems | | Linear Imaging Systems | | Space Invariance | | Space Invariance | | Pin-hole camera | | Pin-hole camera | | Fourier Transformations | | Fourier Transformations | | Modulation Transfer Functions | | Modulation Transfer Functions | | Fourier convolution | | Fourier convolution | | Sampling | | Sampling | | Nyquist | | Nyquist | | counting statistics | | counting statistics | | additive noise | | additive noise | | optical imaging | | optical imaging | | Radiation types | | Radiation types | | Radiation detection | | Radiation detection | | photon detection | | photon detection | | spectra | | spectra | | attenuation | | attenuation | | Planar X-ray imaging | | Planar X-ray imaging | | Projective Imaging | | Projective Imaging | | X-ray CT | | X-ray CT | | Ultrasound | | Ultrasound | | microscopy | k-space | | microscopy | k-space | | NMR pulses | | NMR pulses | | f2-D gradient | | f2-D gradient | | spin echoes | | spin echoes | | 3-D methods of MRI | | 3-D methods of MRI | | volume localized spectroscopy | volume localized spectroscopy

License

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20.309 Biological Engineering II: Instrumentation and Measurement (MIT) 20.309 Biological Engineering II: Instrumentation and Measurement (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course covers sensing and measurement for quantitative molecular/cell/tissue analysis, in terms of genetic, biochemical, and biophysical properties. Methods include light and fluorescence microscopies; electro-mechanical probes such as atomic force microscopy, laser and magnetic traps, and MEMS devices; and the application of statistics, probability and noise analysis to experimental data. Enrollment preference is given to juniors and seniors. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course covers sensing and measurement for quantitative molecular/cell/tissue analysis, in terms of genetic, biochemical, and biophysical properties. Methods include light and fluorescence microscopies; electro-mechanical probes such as atomic force microscopy, laser and magnetic traps, and MEMS devices; and the application of statistics, probability and noise analysis to experimental data. Enrollment preference is given to juniors and seniors.

Subjects

DNA analysis | DNA analysis | Fourier analysis | Fourier analysis | FFT | FFT | DNA melting | DNA melting | electronics | electronics | microscopy | microscopy | microscope | microscope | probes | probes | biology | biology | atomic force microscope | atomic force microscope | AFM | AFM | scanning probe microscope | scanning probe microscope | image processing | image processing | MATLAB | MATLAB | convolution | convolution | optoelectronics | optoelectronics | rheology | rheology | fluorescence | fluorescence | noise | noise | detector | detector | optics | optics | diffraction | diffraction | optical trap | optical trap | 3D | 3D | 3-D | 3-D | three-dimensional imaging | three-dimensional imaging | visualization | visualization

License

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MAS.S63 Engineering Health: Towards the Tricorder (MIT) MAS.S63 Engineering Health: Towards the Tricorder (MIT)

Description

Students will learn to fabricate, remix, and design detection and monitoring devices for health following the core focus of the Tricorder: a portable, handheld diagnostic device which can brings health solutions to consumers at home or in remote parts of the world. Inspired by the Tricorder X-Prize (with a purse of $10 million), students will aim to create specific component technologies that integrate into a comprehensive Tricorder mechanism capable of reading vital signs and specific disease biomarker detection. Component areas will include optical, electric, biochemical, and molecular diagnostics. Students will learn to fabricate, remix, and design detection and monitoring devices for health following the core focus of the Tricorder: a portable, handheld diagnostic device which can brings health solutions to consumers at home or in remote parts of the world. Inspired by the Tricorder X-Prize (with a purse of $10 million), students will aim to create specific component technologies that integrate into a comprehensive Tricorder mechanism capable of reading vital signs and specific disease biomarker detection. Component areas will include optical, electric, biochemical, and molecular diagnostics.

Subjects

Medical | Medical | tricorder | tricorder | prototyping | prototyping | diagnostic | diagnostic | health | health | microscopy | microscopy | imaging | imaging | antibodies | antibodies | Crusher | Crusher | nanoparticles | nanoparticles | sensor | sensor | pulse | pulse | bones | bones | McCoy | McCoy | biomarker | biomarker | nerd | nerd | microfluid | microfluid | Beverly | Beverly | immunoassay | immunoassay | immune | immune | telemedicine | telemedicine

License

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6.781J Submicrometer and Nanometer Technology (MIT) 6.781J Submicrometer and Nanometer Technology (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course surveys techniques to fabricate and analyze submicron and nanometer structures, with applications. Optical and electron microscopy is reviewed. Additional topics that are covered include: surface characterization, preparation, and measurement techniques, resist technology, optical projection, interferometric, X-ray, ion, and electron lithography; Aqueous, ion, and plasma etching techniques; lift-off and electroplating; and ion implantation. Applications in microelectronics, microphotonics, information storage, and nanotechnology will also be explored.AcknowledgementsThe Instructors would like to thank Bob Barsotti, Bryan Cord, and Ben Wunsch for their work on the Atomic Force Microscope video. They would also like to thank Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course surveys techniques to fabricate and analyze submicron and nanometer structures, with applications. Optical and electron microscopy is reviewed. Additional topics that are covered include: surface characterization, preparation, and measurement techniques, resist technology, optical projection, interferometric, X-ray, ion, and electron lithography; Aqueous, ion, and plasma etching techniques; lift-off and electroplating; and ion implantation. Applications in microelectronics, microphotonics, information storage, and nanotechnology will also be explored.AcknowledgementsThe Instructors would like to thank Bob Barsotti, Bryan Cord, and Ben Wunsch for their work on the Atomic Force Microscope video. They would also like to thank

Subjects

submicron and nanometer structures | submicron and nanometer structures | optical and electron microscopy | optical and electron microscopy | Surface characterization | Surface characterization | preparation | preparation | and measurement techniques | and measurement techniques | Resist technology | Resist technology | optical projection | optical projection | interferometric | interferometric | X-ray | X-ray | ion | ion | and electron lithography | and electron lithography | Aqueous | Aqueous | and plasma etching techniques | and plasma etching techniques | Lift-off and electroplating | Lift-off and electroplating | Ion implantation | Ion implantation | microelectronics | microelectronics | microphotonics | microphotonics | information storage | information storage | and nanotechnology | and nanotechnology

License

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Communication (MIT) Communication (MIT)

Description

This introductory biology laboratory course covers the application of experimental techniques in microbiology, biochemistry, cell and developmental biology. Emphasis is placed on the integration of factual knowledge with understanding of the design of the experiments and data analysis in order to prepare the students for future research projects. Development of skills critical for writing about scientific findings in modern biology is also covered in the Scientific Communications portion of the curriculum, 7.02CI. Additional Faculty Dr. Katherine Bacon Schneider Dr. Jean-Francois Hamel Ms. Deborah Kruzel Dr. Megan Rokop This introductory biology laboratory course covers the application of experimental techniques in microbiology, biochemistry, cell and developmental biology. Emphasis is placed on the integration of factual knowledge with understanding of the design of the experiments and data analysis in order to prepare the students for future research projects. Development of skills critical for writing about scientific findings in modern biology is also covered in the Scientific Communications portion of the curriculum, 7.02CI. Additional Faculty Dr. Katherine Bacon Schneider Dr. Jean-Francois Hamel Ms. Deborah Kruzel Dr. Megan Rokop

Subjects

experimental biology | experimental biology | microbial genetics | microbial genetics | protein biochemistry | protein biochemistry | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | development | development | zebrafish | zebrafish | phase contrast microscopy | phase contrast microscopy | teratogenesis | teratogenesis | rna isolation | rna isolation | northern blot | northern blot | gene expression | gene expression | western blot | western blot | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | RNA gel | RNA gel | RNA fixation | RNA fixation | probe labeling | probe labeling | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | transposon | transposon | column chromatography | column chromatography | size-exclusion chromatography | size-exclusion chromatography | anion exchange chromatography | anion exchange chromatography | SDS-Page gel | SDS-Page gel | enzyme kinetics | enzyme kinetics | transformation | transformation | primers | primers

License

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Structural cell biology of virus infection

Description

Professor Kay Grunewald tells us how structural cell biology can help us understand virus infection. Cells constitute the smallest autonomous units of life. The tightly regulated structural and functional organisation is currently only rudimentary understood. Professor Kay Grünewald uses electron cryotomography in combination with other techniques to analyse virus' 'life cycle' in situ, which requires an understanding of its transient structures at the molecular level. Imaging techniques allow us to understand the communication between the virus and the components of the cell it is infecting, which can ultimately help to treat infectious diseases. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

membrane proteins | cell biology | microscopy | electron | virus-host interaction | tomography | membrane proteins | cell biology | microscopy | electron | virus-host interaction | tomography

License

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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electronic properties | magnetism | magentic properties | structure | crystal | lattice | energy | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | quantum | quantum mechanics | radiation | battery | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | polymer | glass | corrosion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.525J Tumor Pathophysiology and Transport Phenomena (MIT) HST.525J Tumor Pathophysiology and Transport Phenomena (MIT)

Description

Tumor pathophysiology plays a central role in the growth, invasion, metastasis and treatment of solid tumors. This class applies principles of transport phenomena to develop a systems-level, quantitative understanding of angiogenesis, blood flow and microcirculation, metabolism and microenvironment, transport and binding of small and large molecules, movement of cancer and immune cells, metastatic process, and treatment response. Additional Faculty Dr. Pat D'Amore Dr. Dan Duda Dr. Robert Langer Prof. Robert Weinberg Dr. Marsha Moses Dr. Raghu Kalluri Dr. Lance Munn Tumor pathophysiology plays a central role in the growth, invasion, metastasis and treatment of solid tumors. This class applies principles of transport phenomena to develop a systems-level, quantitative understanding of angiogenesis, blood flow and microcirculation, metabolism and microenvironment, transport and binding of small and large molecules, movement of cancer and immune cells, metastatic process, and treatment response. Additional Faculty Dr. Pat D'Amore Dr. Dan Duda Dr. Robert Langer Prof. Robert Weinberg Dr. Marsha Moses Dr. Raghu Kalluri Dr. Lance Munn

Subjects

HST.525 | HST.525 | 10.548 | 10.548 | tumor | tumor | cancer | cancer | tumor vasculature | tumor vasculature | antiangiogenesis | antiangiogenesis | bone marrow-derived stem cells | bone marrow-derived stem cells | BMDC | BMDC | stem cell research | stem cell research | experimental cancer therapy | experimental cancer therapy | cancer research | cancer research | tumor-host interactions | tumor-host interactions | vascular normalization | vascular normalization | vascular transport | vascular transport | interstitial transport | interstitial transport | lymphatic transport | lymphatic transport | microcirculation | microcirculation | molecular therapeutics | molecular therapeutics | blood vessels | blood vessels | angiogenesis | angiogenesis | drug delivery | drug delivery | intravital microscopy | intravital microscopy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electronic properties | magnetism | magentic properties | structure | crystal | lattice | energy | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | quantum | quantum mechanics | radiation | battery | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | polymer | glass | corrosion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.123 Neurotechnology in Action (MIT)

Description

This course, as a part of MIT's Center for Neurobiological Engineering curriculum, explores cutting-edge neurotechnology that is essential for advances in all aspects of neuroscience, including improvements in existing methods as well as the development, testing and discussion of completely new paradigms. Readings and in-class sessions cover the fields of electrophysiology, light microscopy, cellular engineering, optogenetics, electron microscopy, MRI / fMRI, and MEG / EEG. The course is designed with lectures that cover the background, context, and theoretical descriptions of neurotechnologies, and labs, which provide firsthand demonstrations as well as in situ lab tours.

Subjects

Neurotechnology | neuron | electrophysiology | light microscopy | cellular engineering | optogenetics | electron microscopy | MRI/fMRI | functional MRI | MEG/EEG

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Structural cell biology of virus infection

Description

Professor Kay Grunewald tells us how structural cell biology can help us understand virus infection. Cells constitute the smallest autonomous units of life. The tightly regulated structural and functional organisation is currently only rudimentary understood. Professor Kay Grünewald uses electron cryotomography in combination with other techniques to analyse virus' 'life cycle' in situ, which requires an understanding of its transient structures at the molecular level. Imaging techniques allow us to understand the communication between the virus and the components of the cell it is infecting, which can ultimately help to treat infectious diseases. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

membrane proteins | cell biology | microscopy | electron | virus-host interaction | tomography | membrane proteins | cell biology | microscopy | electron | virus-host interaction | tomography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Introduction to microscopy

Description

A short video demonstrating how to set up a light microscope.

Subjects

light microscope | microscopy | bioukoer | ukoer | virtual analytical laboratory | val | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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6.781J Submicrometer and Nanometer Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys techniques to fabricate and analyze submicron and nanometer structures, with applications. Optical and electron microscopy is reviewed. Additional topics that are covered include: surface characterization, preparation, and measurement techniques, resist technology, optical projection, interferometric, X-ray, ion, and electron lithography; Aqueous, ion, and plasma etching techniques; lift-off and electroplating; and ion implantation. Applications in microelectronics, microphotonics, information storage, and nanotechnology will also be explored.AcknowledgementsThe Instructors would like to thank Bob Barsotti, Bryan Cord, and Ben Wunsch for their work on the Atomic Force Microscope video. They would also like to thank Bryan Cord for creating each video.

Subjects

submicron and nanometer structures | optical and electron microscopy | Surface characterization | preparation | and measurement techniques | Resist technology | optical projection | interferometric | X-ray | ion | and electron lithography | Aqueous | and plasma etching techniques | Lift-off and electroplating | Ion implantation | microelectronics | microphotonics | information storage | and nanotechnology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Techniques for Studying Materials: Atomic Force Microscopy

Description

This set of animations provides understanding of what Atomic Force Microscopy is and how it is used. From TLP: Atomic Force Microscopy

Subjects

afm | atomic force microscopy | surface morphology | cantilever deflection | contact | mode | tapping | artefact | nanotechnology | lateral force imaging | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | animation | corematerials | ukoer

License

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MAS.S63 Engineering Health: Towards the Tricorder (MIT)

Description

Students will learn to fabricate, remix, and design detection and monitoring devices for health following the core focus of the Tricorder: a portable, handheld diagnostic device which can brings health solutions to consumers at home or in remote parts of the world. Inspired by the Tricorder X-Prize (with a purse of $10 million), students will aim to create specific component technologies that integrate into a comprehensive Tricorder mechanism capable of reading vital signs and specific disease biomarker detection. Component areas will include optical, electric, biochemical, and molecular diagnostics.

Subjects

Medical | tricorder | prototyping | diagnostic | health | microscopy | imaging | antibodies | Crusher | nanoparticles | sensor | pulse | bones | McCoy | biomarker | nerd | microfluid | Beverly | immunoassay | immune | telemedicine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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