Searching for mind : 195 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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Spiders, yes, but why cats?

Description

Prof.Iain McGilchrist illustrates his argument by appeal to a number of paintings done by psychotic patients. He points to various commonalities between these paintings and speculates on the ways in which they support claims about the two hemispheres and Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | psychosis | art | spiders | cats | left-hemisphere | right-hemisphere | philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | psychosis | art | spiders | cats | left-hemisphere | right-hemisphere

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Was Schubert a musical brain?

Description

Prof. Raymond Tallis deepens his argument against the idea that we are our brains. He believes there is a distinction in kind between humans and other animals. This he illustrates by appeal to the differences between the music of Schubert and the singing Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | music | birdsong | philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | music | birdsong

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Am I my mind?

Description

Prof. Iain McGilchrist, whilst agreeing with Tallis that we are not our brains argues that we can learn a great deal about our culture by learning more about our brain. In particular we should recognise we have two hemispheres, each with a different funct Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem

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Am I my brain?

Description

Prof. Raymond Tallis argues that extraordinary claims have been made for neurophysiology. For example it has been said that a person is nothing but his or her brain. Professor Raymond Tallis rejects this ?neuromania?. He shows why it is attractive, but al Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem

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Spiders, yes, but why cats?

Description

Prof.Iain McGilchrist illustrates his argument by appeal to a number of paintings done by psychotic patients. He points to various commonalities between these paintings and speculates on the ways in which they support claims about the two hemispheres and Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | psychosis | art | spiders | cats | left-hemisphere | right-hemisphere | philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | psychosis | art | spiders | cats | left-hemisphere | right-hemisphere

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Was Schubert a musical brain?

Description

Prof. Raymond Tallis deepens his argument against the idea that we are our brains. He believes there is a distinction in kind between humans and other animals. This he illustrates by appeal to the differences between the music of Schubert and the singing Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | music | birdsong | philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | music | birdsong

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Am I my mind?

Description

Prof. Iain McGilchrist, whilst agreeing with Tallis that we are not our brains argues that we can learn a great deal about our culture by learning more about our brain. In particular we should recognise we have two hemispheres, each with a different funct Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Am I my brain?

Description

Prof. Raymond Tallis argues that extraordinary claims have been made for neurophysiology. For example it has been said that a person is nothing but his or her brain. Professor Raymond Tallis rejects this ?neuromania?. He shows why it is attractive, but al Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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ES.S71 Increasing Your Physical Intelligence, Enhancing Your Social Smarts (MIT) ES.S71 Increasing Your Physical Intelligence, Enhancing Your Social Smarts (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this class is to offer students a new perspective on the importance of our bodily experience to our cognitive and social lives. The curriculum is designed to foster a working appreciation for how better bodily awareness can positively affect how we feel in our bodies, carry and present ourselves for improved social sensitivity and more successful social interactions.  The purpose of this class is to offer students a new perspective on the importance of our bodily experience to our cognitive and social lives. The curriculum is designed to foster a working appreciation for how better bodily awareness can positively affect how we feel in our bodies, carry and present ourselves for improved social sensitivity and more successful social interactions. 

Subjects

physical intelligence | physical intelligence | exercise | exercise | social interactions | social interactions | training | training | balance | balance | strength | strength | flexibility | flexibility | mindfulness | mindfulness | mind and body | mind and body | cognitive development | cognitive development | self awareness | self awareness

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.09 Minds and Machines (MIT) 24.09 Minds and Machines (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind.

Subjects

Searle | Searle | AI | AI | Turing Test | Turing Test | dualism | dualism | behaviorism | behaviorism | identity theory | identity theory | Kripke | Kripke | functionalism | functionalism | intentionality | intentionality | externalism | externalism | perception | perception | self-knowledge | self-knowledge | knowledge argument | knowledge argument | Chalmers | Chalmers | Nagel | Nagel | panprotopsychism | panprotopsychism | mysterianism | mysterianism | consciousness | consciousness | rene descartes | rene descartes | mind | mind | brain | brain | causal theory | causal theory | pain | pain | relief | relief | meaning | meaning | individualism | individualism | qualia | qualia | mind-body problem | mind-body problem | free will | free will

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry - British Poetry and the Sciences of the Mind (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry - British Poetry and the Sciences of the Mind (MIT)

Description

Do poems think? Recurrent images of the poet as an inspired lunatic, and of poetry as a fundamentally irrational art, have often fostered an understanding of poets and their work as generally extraneous to the work of the sciences. Yet poets have long reflected upon and have sought to embody in their work the most elementary processes of mind, and have frequently drawn for these representations on the very sciences to which they are thought to stand - and sometimes do genuinely stand - in opposition. Far from representing a mere departure from reason, then, the poem offers an image of the mind at work, an account of how minds work, a tool for eliciting thought in the reader or auditor. Bringing together readings in British poetry of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with writings fro Do poems think? Recurrent images of the poet as an inspired lunatic, and of poetry as a fundamentally irrational art, have often fostered an understanding of poets and their work as generally extraneous to the work of the sciences. Yet poets have long reflected upon and have sought to embody in their work the most elementary processes of mind, and have frequently drawn for these representations on the very sciences to which they are thought to stand - and sometimes do genuinely stand - in opposition. Far from representing a mere departure from reason, then, the poem offers an image of the mind at work, an account of how minds work, a tool for eliciting thought in the reader or auditor. Bringing together readings in British poetry of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with writings fro

Subjects

poems | poems | think | think | images | images | poet | poet | lunatic | lunatic | irrational | irrational | art | art | sciences | sciences | processes of mind | processes of mind | reason | reason | mind | mind | thought | thought | British | British | eighteenth | eighteenth | nineteenth | nineteenth | centuries | centuries | psychology | psychology | physiology | physiology | brain | brain | interdisciplinary course | interdisciplinary course | lyric | lyric | didactic | didactic | cognition | cognition | medicine | medicine | literary study | literary study | humanistic research | humanistic research

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.09 Minds and Machines (MIT) 24.09 Minds and Machines (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. Some of the questions we will discuss include the following. Can computers think? Is the mind an immaterial thing? Or is the mind the brain? Or does the mind stand to the brain as a computer program stands to the hardware? How can creatures like ourselves think thoughts that are "about" things? (For example, we can all think that Aristotle is a philosopher, and in that sense think "about" Aristotle, but what is the explanation of this quite remarkable ability?) Can I know whether your experiences and my experiences when we look at raspberries, fire trucks and stop lights are the same? Can consciousness be given a scientific explanation? This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. Some of the questions we will discuss include the following. Can computers think? Is the mind an immaterial thing? Or is the mind the brain? Or does the mind stand to the brain as a computer program stands to the hardware? How can creatures like ourselves think thoughts that are "about" things? (For example, we can all think that Aristotle is a philosopher, and in that sense think "about" Aristotle, but what is the explanation of this quite remarkable ability?) Can I know whether your experiences and my experiences when we look at raspberries, fire trucks and stop lights are the same? Can consciousness be given a scientific explanation?

Subjects

Searle; AI | Searle; AI | dualism | dualism | behaviorism | behaviorism | identity theory | identity theory | functionalism | functionalism | intentionality | intentionality | externalism | externalism | self-knowledge | self-knowledge | knowledge argument | knowledge argument | chalmer | chalmer | panprotopsychism | panprotopsychism | mysterianism | mysterianism | conciousness | conciousness | rene descartes | rene descartes | mind | mind | brain | brain | causal theory | causal theory | pain | pain | relief | relief | meaning | meaning | individualism | individualism | qualia | qualia | mind-body problem | mind-body problem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Jane Agnes Duffy, arrested for theft Jane Agnes Duffy, arrested for theft

Description

Subjects

shadow | shadow | portrait | portrait | eye | eye | face | face | hat | hat | scarf | scarf | mouth | mouth | hair | hair | nose | nose | head | head | mark | mark | board | board | coat | coat | grain | grain | property | property | case | case | criminal | criminal | fabric | fabric | crime | crime | mugshot | mugshot | ribbon | ribbon | stolen | stolen | unusual | unusual | ww1 | ww1 | disturbed | disturbed | theft | theft | southshields | southshields | policestation | policestation | firstworldwar | firstworldwar | youngwoman | youngwoman | hearing | hearing | attentive | attentive | accused | accused | arrested | arrested | stealing | stealing | mentalhealth | mentalhealth | prisoner | prisoner | civilian | civilian | homefront | homefront | fascinating | fascinating | digitalimage | digitalimage | troubled | troubled | charged | charged | wallsend | wallsend | lodgings | lodgings | northshields | northshields | feebleminded | feebleminded | socialissues | socialissues | socialhistory | socialhistory | goldring | goldring | bedfordstreet | bedfordstreet | blackframe | blackframe | blackandwhitephotograph | blackandwhitephotograph | goodhome | goodhome | criminalrecord | criminalrecord | publicrecords | publicrecords | silkblouse | silkblouse | goodbehaviour | goodbehaviour | neutralbackground | neutralbackground | newspaperreport | newspaperreport | courthearing | courthearing | goldbrooch | goldbrooch | weakmind | weakmind | barbaracunningham | barbaracunningham | northshieldspolicestation | northshieldspolicestation | theshieldsdailynews | theshieldsdailynews | 9december1914 | 9december1914 | trevorterrace | trevorterrace | detectivesergthall | detectivesergthall | detectivesweeney | detectivesweeney | criminalfacesofnorthshieldsfirstworldwar | criminalfacesofnorthshieldsfirstworldwar | janeagnesduffy | janeagnesduffy | £112s6d | £112s6d | 61westcottroad | 61westcottroad | 17december1914 | 17december1914

License

No known copyright restrictions

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6.868J The Society of Mind (MIT) 6.868J The Society of Mind (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to a theory that tries to explain how minds are made from collections of simpler processes. The subject treats such aspects of thinking as vision, language, learning, reasoning, memory, consciousness, ideals, emotions, and personality. Ideas incorporate psychology, artificial intelligence, and computer science to resolve theoretical issues such as whole vs. parts, structural vs. functional descriptions, declarative vs. procedural representations, symbolic vs. connectionist models, and logical vs. common-sense theories of learning. This course is an introduction to a theory that tries to explain how minds are made from collections of simpler processes. The subject treats such aspects of thinking as vision, language, learning, reasoning, memory, consciousness, ideals, emotions, and personality. Ideas incorporate psychology, artificial intelligence, and computer science to resolve theoretical issues such as whole vs. parts, structural vs. functional descriptions, declarative vs. procedural representations, symbolic vs. connectionist models, and logical vs. common-sense theories of learning.

Subjects

how minds work | how minds work | thinking | thinking | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | abstract model | abstract model | human mind | human mind | emotion machine | emotion machine | common sense thinking | common sense thinking | mental processes | mental processes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.868J The Society of Mind (MIT) 6.868J The Society of Mind (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is an introduction to the theory that tries to explain how minds are made from collections of simpler processes. It treats such aspects of thinking as vision, language, learning, reasoning, memory, consciousness, ideals, emotions, and personality. It incorporates ideas from psychology, artificial intelligence, and computer science to resolve theoretical issues such as wholes vs. parts, structural vs. functional descriptions, declarative vs. procedural representations, symbolic vs. connectionist models, and logical vs. common-sense theories of learning. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is an introduction to the theory that tries to explain how minds are made from collections of simpler processes. It treats such aspects of thinking as vision, language, learning, reasoning, memory, consciousness, ideals, emotions, and personality. It incorporates ideas from psychology, artificial intelligence, and computer science to resolve theoretical issues such as wholes vs. parts, structural vs. functional descriptions, declarative vs. procedural representations, symbolic vs. connectionist models, and logical vs. common-sense theories of learning.

Subjects

marvin minsky | marvin minsky | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | society of the mind | society of the mind | emotion machine | emotion machine | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | cognitive theory | cognitive theory | philosophy of the mind | philosophy of the mind

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.965 Special Topics in Media Technology: Cooperative Machines (MIT) MAS.965 Special Topics in Media Technology: Cooperative Machines (MIT)

Description

This course examines the issues, principles, and challenges toward building machines that cooperate with humans and with other machines. Philosophical, scientific, and theoretical insights into this subject will be covered, as well as how these ideas are manifest in both natural and artificial systems (e.g. software agents and robots). This course examines the issues, principles, and challenges toward building machines that cooperate with humans and with other machines. Philosophical, scientific, and theoretical insights into this subject will be covered, as well as how these ideas are manifest in both natural and artificial systems (e.g. software agents and robots).

Subjects

cooperative machines | cooperative machines | robotics | robotics | electrical engineering | electrical engineering | manufacture | manufacture | human interaction | human interaction | perception | perception | emotion | emotion | theory of mind | theory of mind | behavior and the mind | behavior and the mind | robots | robots | human-machine collaboration | human-machine collaboration | intention and action | intention and action | teamwork | teamwork

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.S71 Increasing Your Physical Intelligence, Enhancing Your Social Smarts (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this class is to offer students a new perspective on the importance of our bodily experience to our cognitive and social lives. The curriculum is designed to foster a working appreciation for how better bodily awareness can positively affect how we feel in our bodies, carry and present ourselves for improved social sensitivity and more successful social interactions. 

Subjects

physical intelligence | exercise | social interactions | training | balance | strength | flexibility | mindfulness | mind and body | cognitive development | self awareness

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.09 Minds and Machines (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. Some of the questions we will discuss include the following. Can computers think? Is the mind an immaterial thing? Or is the mind the brain? Or does the mind stand to the brain as a computer program stands to the hardware? How can creatures like ourselves think thoughts that are "about" things? (For example, we can all think that Aristotle is a philosopher, and in that sense think "about" Aristotle, but what is the explanation of this quite remarkable ability?) Can I know whether your experiences and my experiences when we look at raspberries, fire trucks and stop lights are the same? Can consciousness be given a scientific explanation?

Subjects

Searle; AI | dualism | behaviorism | identity theory | functionalism | intentionality | externalism | self-knowledge | knowledge argument | chalmer | panprotopsychism | mysterianism | conciousness | rene descartes | mind | brain | causal theory | pain | relief | meaning | individualism | qualia | mind-body problem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.4 Persons, Humans and Brains

Description

Part 8.4. The final part of this series. Explores the distinction between mind and body and whether this makes a difference to the idea of personal identity. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

body | parfit | locke | philosophy | mind | waismann | identity | hume | body | parfit | locke | philosophy | mind | waismann | identity | hume

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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24.400 Proseminar in Philosophy I (MIT) 24.400 Proseminar in Philosophy I (MIT)

Description

This course is an intensive seminar on the foundations of analytic philosophy for first-year graduate students. A large selection of classic texts, such as Frege's Foundations of Arithmetic, Russell's Problems of Philosophy, and Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations, is covered in this course. This course is an intensive seminar on the foundations of analytic philosophy for first-year graduate students. A large selection of classic texts, such as Frege's Foundations of Arithmetic, Russell's Problems of Philosophy, and Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations, is covered in this course.

Subjects

philosophy | philosophy | Frege | Frege | Meinong | Meinong | Russell | Russell | On Denoting | On Denoting | Theory of Objects | Theory of Objects | Brentano | Brentano | Husserl | Husserl | Wittgenstein | Wittgenstein | Tractatus | Tractatus | Moore | Moore | Principia Ethica | Principia Ethica | intrinsic value | intrinsic value | common sense | common sense | Ayer | Ayer | language | language | truth | truth | logic | logic | Ryle | Ryle | concept of mind | concept of mind | Austin | Austin | Sense and Sensibilia | Sense and Sensibilia | Foundations of Empirical Knowledge | Foundations of Empirical Knowledge | analytic philosophy | analytic philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.965 Special Topics in Media Technology: Cooperative Machines (MIT)

Description

This course examines the issues, principles, and challenges toward building machines that cooperate with humans and with other machines. Philosophical, scientific, and theoretical insights into this subject will be covered, as well as how these ideas are manifest in both natural and artificial systems (e.g. software agents and robots).

Subjects

cooperative machines | robotics | electrical engineering | manufacture | human interaction | perception | emotion | theory of mind | behavior and the mind | robots | human-machine collaboration | intention and action | teamwork

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.868J The Society of Mind (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to a theory that tries to explain how minds are made from collections of simpler processes. The subject treats such aspects of thinking as vision, language, learning, reasoning, memory, consciousness, ideals, emotions, and personality. Ideas incorporate psychology, artificial intelligence, and computer science to resolve theoretical issues such as whole vs. parts, structural vs. functional descriptions, declarative vs. procedural representations, symbolic vs. connectionist models, and logical vs. common-sense theories of learning.

Subjects

how minds work | thinking | artificial intelligence | abstract model | human mind | emotion machine | common sense thinking | mental processes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.85 Infant and Early Childhood Cognition (MIT) 9.85 Infant and Early Childhood Cognition (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to cognitive development focusing on children's understanding of objects, agents, and causality. Students develop a critical understanding of experimental design and how developmental research might address philosophical questions about the origins of knowledge, appearance and reality, and the problem of other minds. This course is an introduction to cognitive development focusing on children's understanding of objects, agents, and causality. Students develop a critical understanding of experimental design and how developmental research might address philosophical questions about the origins of knowledge, appearance and reality, and the problem of other minds.

Subjects

infant cognition | infant cognition | early childhood cognition | early childhood cognition | cognitive development | cognitive development | developmental psychology | developmental psychology | psychology | psychology | developmental research | developmental research | Piaget | Piaget | object knowledge | object knowledge | object individuation | object individuation | object concept | object concept | agents | agents | causal knowledge | causal knowledge | theory of mind | theory of mind | causation | causation | causal transformations | causal transformations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Mind Mapping - Learning Package

Description

This is a learning package about developing your use of mind mapping

Subjects

employability | ideas | ukoer | mind mapping | mind maps | note taking | memory aid | administrative studies | N000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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4.3 Cartesian Dualism

Description

Part 4.3. Introduces Descartes' idea of dualism, that there is a separation between the mind and the body, as well as some of the philosophical issues surrounding this idea. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

dualism | body | scepticism | descartes | knowledge | meditations | philosophy | mind | truth | skepticism | dualism | body | scepticism | descartes | knowledge | meditations | philosophy | mind | truth | skepticism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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