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24.244 Modal Logic (MIT) 24.244 Modal Logic (MIT)

Description

Modal logic is the logic of necessity and possibility, and by extension of analogously paired notions like validity and consistency, obligation and permission, the known and the not-ruled-out. This a first course in the area. A solid background in first-order logic is essential. Topics to be covered include (some or all of) the main systems of propositional modal logic, Kripkean "possible world" semantics, strict implication, contingent identity, intensional objects, counterpart theory, the logic of actuality, and deontic and / or epistemic logic. The emphasis will be more on technical methods and results than philosophical applications. Modal logic is the logic of necessity and possibility, and by extension of analogously paired notions like validity and consistency, obligation and permission, the known and the not-ruled-out. This a first course in the area. A solid background in first-order logic is essential. Topics to be covered include (some or all of) the main systems of propositional modal logic, Kripkean "possible world" semantics, strict implication, contingent identity, intensional objects, counterpart theory, the logic of actuality, and deontic and / or epistemic logic. The emphasis will be more on technical methods and results than philosophical applications.

Subjects

W. V. Quine's modal logic | W. V. Quine's modal logic | Lewis's S1 and S2 | Lewis's S1 and S2 | propositional modal logic | propositional modal logic | completeness | completeness | frames and models | frames and models | tense logic | tense logic | combining modality and tense | combining modality and tense | epistemic logic | epistemic logic | quantified modal logic | quantified modal logic

License

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24.973 Advanced Semantics (MIT) 24.973 Advanced Semantics (MIT)

Description

This course is the second of the three parts of our graduate introduction to semantics. The others are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory. Like the other courses, this one is not meant as an overview of the field and its current developments. Our aim is to help you to develop the ability for semantic analysis, and we think that exploring a few topics in detail together with hands-on practical work is more effective than offering a bird's-eye view of everything. Once you have gained some experience in doing semantic analysis, reading around in the many recent handbooks and in current issues of major journals and attending our seminars and colloquia will give you all you need to prosper. Because we want to focus, we need to make difficult choices as This course is the second of the three parts of our graduate introduction to semantics. The others are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory. Like the other courses, this one is not meant as an overview of the field and its current developments. Our aim is to help you to develop the ability for semantic analysis, and we think that exploring a few topics in detail together with hands-on practical work is more effective than offering a bird's-eye view of everything. Once you have gained some experience in doing semantic analysis, reading around in the many recent handbooks and in current issues of major journals and attending our seminars and colloquia will give you all you need to prosper. Because we want to focus, we need to make difficult choices as

Subjects

semantics | semantics | logic | logic | meaning | meaning | syntactic systems | syntactic systems | generative grammar | generative grammar | displacement | displacement | intensional semantics | intensional semantics | Hintikka's idea | Hintikka's idea | accessibility relations | accessibility relations | modality | modality | quantificational theory of modality | quantificational theory of modality | material implication analysis | material implication analysis | strict implication analysis | strict implication analysis | tense | tense | conditionals | conditionals | progressive | progressive | perfect | perfect | de re | de re | de dicto | de dicto | raised subjects | raised subjects | scope paradox | scope paradox | overt world variables | overt world variables | restrictors | restrictors | syntax movement | syntax movement | wh-movement | wh-movement | DP | DP | VP | VP

License

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24.910 Topics in Linguistics Theory (MIT) 24.910 Topics in Linguistics Theory (MIT)

Description

I realize that "Modes of Assertion" is a rather cryptic title for the course. What we will explore are ways of modulating the force of an assertion. This will engage us in formal semantics and pragmatics, the theory of speech acts and performative utterances, and quite a bit of empirical work on a not-too-well understood complex of data. "It is obvious that he made a big mistake." If you're like me you didn't feel much of a difference. But now see what happens when you embed the two sentences: "We have to fire him, because he obviously made a big mistake." "We have to fire him, because it is obvious that he made a big mistake." One of the two examples is unremarkable, the other suggests that the reason he needs to be fired is not that he made a big I realize that "Modes of Assertion" is a rather cryptic title for the course. What we will explore are ways of modulating the force of an assertion. This will engage us in formal semantics and pragmatics, the theory of speech acts and performative utterances, and quite a bit of empirical work on a not-too-well understood complex of data. "It is obvious that he made a big mistake." If you're like me you didn't feel much of a difference. But now see what happens when you embed the two sentences: "We have to fire him, because he obviously made a big mistake." "We have to fire him, because it is obvious that he made a big mistake." One of the two examples is unremarkable, the other suggests that the reason he needs to be fired is not that he made a big

Subjects

linguistic theory | linguistic theory | semantics | semantics | typology | typology | preformatics | preformatics | modality | modality | evidentiality | evidentiality | embedded assertions | embedded assertions | modes of assertion | modes of assertion | modulation | modulation | force | force | formal semantics | formal semantics | pragmatics | pragmatics | speech acts | speech acts | performative utterances | performative utterances | language constructions | language constructions | English | English | German | German | Quechua | Quechua | Tibetan | Tibetan | evidentiality marking | evidentiality marking | epistemic modality | epistemic modality | performatives | performatives | evidentials | evidentials | direct evidentiality | direct evidentiality | indirect evidentiality | indirect evidentiality | conditionals | conditionals | Faller?s ideas | Faller?s ideas | best possible grounds | best possible grounds

License

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24.244 Modal Logic (MIT)

Description

Modal logic is the logic of necessity and possibility, and by extension of analogously paired notions like validity and consistency, obligation and permission, the known and the not-ruled-out. This a first course in the area. A solid background in first-order logic is essential. Topics to be covered include (some or all of) the main systems of propositional modal logic, Kripkean "possible world" semantics, strict implication, contingent identity, intensional objects, counterpart theory, the logic of actuality, and deontic and / or epistemic logic. The emphasis will be more on technical methods and results than philosophical applications.

Subjects

W. V. Quine's modal logic | Lewis's S1 and S2 | propositional modal logic | completeness | frames and models | tense logic | combining modality and tense | epistemic logic | quantified modal logic

License

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Multimodal Perception and the Distinction Between the Senses

Description

Louise Fiona Richardson gives a talk on philosophy and perception It is beyond dispute that the senses interact. In this paper I will consider the way in which such interaction constrains thought about the senses, and in particular, thought about how they are distinguished from one another. I will consider two views of what it is to have a sense. On the first view, senses are systems. On the second, they are capacities. I will argue that on each view, the occurrence of different forms of multimodal perception rules out some views of how the senses are distinguished. The occurrence of perception not restricted to one sense does not, however, make it impossible to distinguish between the senses, either as systems or capacities. Neither does it make that distinction otiose. And whilst there i Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | perception | Multimodal Perception | philosophy | perception | Multimodal Perception

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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1.221J Transportation Systems (MIT) 1.221J Transportation Systems (MIT)

Description

This subject introduces transportation as a large-scale, integrated system that interacts directly with the social, political, and economic aspects of contemporary society. Fundamental elements and issues shaping traveler and freight transportation systems. Underlying principles governing transportation planning, investment, operations, and maintenance. System performance and level-of-service metrics and the determinants of transportation travel demand. Design of transportation services and facilities for various modes and intermodal operations. This subject introduces transportation as a large-scale, integrated system that interacts directly with the social, political, and economic aspects of contemporary society. Fundamental elements and issues shaping traveler and freight transportation systems. Underlying principles governing transportation planning, investment, operations, and maintenance. System performance and level-of-service metrics and the determinants of transportation travel demand. Design of transportation services and facilities for various modes and intermodal operations.

Subjects

transportation systems | transportation systems | large-scale integrated systems | large-scale integrated systems | passenger transportation systems | passenger transportation systems | freight transportation systems | freight transportation systems | transportation planning | transportation planning | transportation investment | transportation investment | transportation operations | transportation operations | transportation maintenance | transportation maintenance | system performance | system performance | level of service metrics | level of service metrics | level of service determinants | level of service determinants | design of transportation services | design of transportation services | intermodal transportation | intermodal transportation | 1.221 | 1.221 | 11.527 | 11.527 | ESD.201 | ESD.201

License

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9.59J Psycholinguistics (MIT) 9.59J Psycholinguistics (MIT)

Description

Central topics in language processing. The structure of language. Sentence processing. Discourse processing. Morphological processing. The storage and access of words in the mental dictionary. Speech processing. The relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism. Ambiguity resolution. Discussion of computational modeling, including connectionist models. The relationship between language and thought. Issues in language acquisition including critical period phenomena, the acquisition of speech, and the acquisition of words. Experimental methodologies such as self-paced reading, eye-tracking, cross-modal priming, and neural imaging methods. Central topics in language processing. The structure of language. Sentence processing. Discourse processing. Morphological processing. The storage and access of words in the mental dictionary. Speech processing. The relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism. Ambiguity resolution. Discussion of computational modeling, including connectionist models. The relationship between language and thought. Issues in language acquisition including critical period phenomena, the acquisition of speech, and the acquisition of words. Experimental methodologies such as self-paced reading, eye-tracking, cross-modal priming, and neural imaging methods.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | Language | Language | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | storage | storage | access | access | Speech processing | Speech processing | computation | computation | Ambiguity | Ambiguity | connectionist models | connectionist models | thought | thought | acquisition | acquisition | critical period phenomena | critical period phenomena | acquisition of speech | acquisition of speech | word acquisition | word acquisition | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | neural imaging methods. | neural imaging methods. | 9.59 | 9.59 | 24.905 | 24.905

License

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24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory (MIT) 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory (MIT)

Description

The course introduces formal theories of context-dependency, presupposition, implicature, context-change, focus and topic. Special emphasis is on the division of labor between semantics and pragmatics. It also covers applications to the analysis of quantification, definiteness, presupposition projection, conditionals and modality, anaphora, questions and answers. The course introduces formal theories of context-dependency, presupposition, implicature, context-change, focus and topic. Special emphasis is on the division of labor between semantics and pragmatics. It also covers applications to the analysis of quantification, definiteness, presupposition projection, conditionals and modality, anaphora, questions and answers.

Subjects

context-dependency | context-dependency | presupposition | presupposition | implicature | implicature | context-change | context-change | focus | focus | topic | topic | semantics | semantics | pragmatics | pragmatics | quantification | quantification | definiteness | definiteness | presupposition projection | presupposition projection | conditionals | conditionals | modality | modality | anaphora | anaphora | questions | questions | answers | answers

License

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9.591J Language Processing (MIT) 9.591J Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations. This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | language | language | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | storage | storage | access | access | Speech processing | Speech processing | computation | computation | Ambiguity | Ambiguity | connectionist models | connectionist models | thought | thought | acquisition | acquisition | critical period phenomena | critical period phenomena | acquisition of speech | acquisition of speech | word acquisition | word acquisition | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | neural imaging methods | neural imaging methods | 9.591 | 9.591 | 24.945 | 24.945

License

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24.921 Special Topics in Linguistics: Genericity (MIT) 24.921 Special Topics in Linguistics: Genericity (MIT)

Description

This course will investigate the semantics of generic sentences, i.e., sentences that are used to talk about habits, tendencies, dispositions, or kinds. For instance: Dogs are good pets. The giant panda is an endangered species. A soccer player makes lots of money. Mary smokes after dinner. This machine crushes oranges. This is a half-semester course. This course will investigate the semantics of generic sentences, i.e., sentences that are used to talk about habits, tendencies, dispositions, or kinds. For instance: Dogs are good pets. The giant panda is an endangered species. A soccer player makes lots of money. Mary smokes after dinner. This machine crushes oranges. This is a half-semester course.

Subjects

semantics of generic sentences | semantics of generic sentences | modality | modality | adverbial quantifiers | adverbial quantifiers | semantics of aspect | semantics of aspect

License

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24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory (MIT) 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory (MIT)

Description

The course introduces formal theories of context-dependency, presupposition, implicature, context-change, focus and topic. Special emphasis is on the division of labor between semantics and pragmatics. It also covers applications to the analysis of quantification, definiteness, presupposition projection, conditionals and modality, anaphora, questions and answers. The course introduces formal theories of context-dependency, presupposition, implicature, context-change, focus and topic. Special emphasis is on the division of labor between semantics and pragmatics. It also covers applications to the analysis of quantification, definiteness, presupposition projection, conditionals and modality, anaphora, questions and answers.

Subjects

context-dependency | context-dependency | presupposition | presupposition | implicature | implicature | context-change | context-change | focus and topic | focus and topic | division of labor | division of labor | semantics | semantics | pragmatics | pragmatics | quantification | quantification | definiteness | definiteness | presupposition projection | presupposition projection | conditionals | conditionals | modality | modality | anaphora | anaphora

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.973 Advanced Semantics (MIT)

Description

This course is the second of the three parts of our graduate introduction to semantics. The others are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory. Like the other courses, this one is not meant as an overview of the field and its current developments. Our aim is to help you to develop the ability for semantic analysis, and we think that exploring a few topics in detail together with hands-on practical work is more effective than offering a bird's-eye view of everything. Once you have gained some experience in doing semantic analysis, reading around in the many recent handbooks and in current issues of major journals and attending our seminars and colloquia will give you all you need to prosper. Because we want to focus, we need to make difficult choices as

Subjects

semantics | logic | meaning | syntactic systems | generative grammar | displacement | intensional semantics | Hintikka's idea | accessibility relations | modality | quantificational theory of modality | material implication analysis | strict implication analysis | tense | conditionals | progressive | perfect | de re | de dicto | raised subjects | scope paradox | overt world variables | restrictors | syntax movement | wh-movement | DP | VP

License

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2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT) 2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. The various topics covered are as follows: mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices, analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations, state-determined systems, Laplace transforms, transfer functions, frequency response, Bode plots, vibrations, modal analysis, open- and closed-loop control, instability, time-domain controller design, and introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications are also covered. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. The various topics covered are as follows: mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices, analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations, state-determined systems, Laplace transforms, transfer functions, frequency response, Bode plots, vibrations, modal analysis, open- and closed-loop control, instability, time-domain controller design, and introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications are also covered.

Subjects

modeling | modeling | analysis | analysis | dynamic | dynamic | systems | systems | mechanical | mechanical | translation | translation | uniaxial | uniaxial | rotation | rotation | electrical | electrical | circuits | circuits | coupling | coupling | levers | levers | gears | gears | electro-mechanical | electro-mechanical | devices | devices | linear | linear | differential | differential | equations | equations | state-determined | state-determined | Laplace | Laplace | transforms | transforms | transfer | transfer | functions | functions | frequency | frequency | response | response | Bode | Bode | vibrations | vibrations | modal | modal | open-loop | open-loop | closed-loop | closed-loop | control | control | instability | instability | time-domain | time-domain | controller | controller | frequency-domain | frequency-domain

License

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9.35 Sensation and Perception (MIT) 9.35 Sensation and Perception (MIT)

Description

This course explores how senses work and how physical stimuli get transformed into signals in the nervous system, as well as how the brain uses those signals to determine what's out there in the world. All the senses are discussed, with a focus on vision. Topics include perception of color, motion, form, and depth. This course explores how senses work and how physical stimuli get transformed into signals in the nervous system, as well as how the brain uses those signals to determine what's out there in the world. All the senses are discussed, with a focus on vision. Topics include perception of color, motion, form, and depth.

Subjects

vision | vision | sensation | sensation | perception | perception | psychophysics | psychophysics | illusion | illusion | depth | depth | parallax | parallax | motion | motion | occlusion | occlusion | matching | matching | recognition | recognition | smell | smell | taste | taste | hearing | hearing | perspective | perspective | sight | sight | figure | figure | ground | ground | completion | completion | modal | modal

License

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9.35 Sensation And Perception (MIT) 9.35 Sensation And Perception (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate, or are they acquired by experience? (And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'?) Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course will include guest lectures by Professors. This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate, or are they acquired by experience? (And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'?) Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course will include guest lectures by Professors.

Subjects

vision | vision | sensation | sensation | perception | perception | psychophysics | psychophysics | illusion | illusion | depth | depth | parallax | parallax | motion | motion | occlusion | occlusion | matching | matching | recognition | recognition | smell | smell | taste | taste | hearing | hearing | perspective | perspective | sight | sight | figure | figure | ground | ground | completion | completion | modal | modal | senses | senses | stimuli | stimuli | system | system | color | color | form | form | depth. | depth.

License

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24.910 Topics in Linguistics Theory (MIT)

Description

I realize that "Modes of Assertion" is a rather cryptic title for the course. What we will explore are ways of modulating the force of an assertion. This will engage us in formal semantics and pragmatics, the theory of speech acts and performative utterances, and quite a bit of empirical work on a not-too-well understood complex of data. "It is obvious that he made a big mistake." If you're like me you didn't feel much of a difference. But now see what happens when you embed the two sentences: "We have to fire him, because he obviously made a big mistake." "We have to fire him, because it is obvious that he made a big mistake." One of the two examples is unremarkable, the other suggests that the reason he needs to be fired is not that he made a big

Subjects

linguistic theory | semantics | typology | preformatics | modality | evidentiality | embedded assertions | modes of assertion | modulation | force | formal semantics | pragmatics | speech acts | performative utterances | language constructions | English | German | Quechua | Tibetan | evidentiality marking | epistemic modality | performatives | evidentials | direct evidentiality | indirect evidentiality | conditionals | Faller?s ideas | best possible grounds

License

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11.540J Urban Transportation Planning (MIT) 11.540J Urban Transportation Planning (MIT)

Description

The history, policy, and politics of urban transportation are discussed in this class. Also covered are the role of the federal government, the "highway revolt" and public transit in the auto era, using analytic tools for transportation planning and policy analysis. The class then explores the contribution of transportation to air pollution and climate change, land use and transportation interactions, together with issues with bicycles, pedestrians, and traffic calming. Examples used in the class are taken mainly from the Boston metropolitan area. The history, policy, and politics of urban transportation are discussed in this class. Also covered are the role of the federal government, the "highway revolt" and public transit in the auto era, using analytic tools for transportation planning and policy analysis. The class then explores the contribution of transportation to air pollution and climate change, land use and transportation interactions, together with issues with bicycles, pedestrians, and traffic calming. Examples used in the class are taken mainly from the Boston metropolitan area.

Subjects

11.540 | 11.540 | 1.252 | 1.252 | ESD.225 | ESD.225 | urban transportation planning | urban transportation planning | history | history | policy | policy | politics of urban transportation | politics of urban transportation | highway revolt | highway revolt | public transit | public transit | auto era | auto era | policy analysis | policy analysis | air pollution | air pollution | climate change | climate change | land use | land use | transportation interactions | transportation interactions | bicycles | bicycles | pedestrians | pedestrians | traffic calming | traffic calming | boston area examples | boston area examples | infrastructure | infrastructure | Big Dig | Big Dig | civil engineering | civil engineering | environmental engineering | environmental engineering | highway finance | highway finance | environmental and planning regulations | environmental and planning regulations | air quality | air quality | modal characteristics | modal characteristics | information technologies | information technologies

License

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24.910 Topics in Linguistics Theory (MIT)

Description

I realize that "Modes of Assertion" is a rather cryptic title for the course. What we will explore are ways of modulating the force of an assertion. This will engage us in formal semantics and pragmatics, the theory of speech acts and performative utterances, and quite a bit of empirical work on a not-too-well understood complex of data. "It is obvious that he made a big mistake." If you're like me you didn't feel much of a difference. But now see what happens when you embed the two sentences: "We have to fire him, because he obviously made a big mistake." "We have to fire him, because it is obvious that he made a big mistake." One of the two examples is unremarkable, the other suggests that the reason he needs to be fired is not that he made a big

Subjects

linguistic theory | semantics | typology | preformatics | modality | evidentiality | embedded assertions | modes of assertion | modulation | force | formal semantics | pragmatics | speech acts | performative utterances | language constructions | English | German | Quechua | Tibetan | evidentiality marking | epistemic modality | performatives | evidentials | direct evidentiality | indirect evidentiality | conditionals | Faller?s ideas | best possible grounds

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6.345 Automatic Speech Recognition (MIT) 6.345 Automatic Speech Recognition (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. 6.345 introduces students to the rapidly developing field of automatic speech recognition. Its content is divided into three parts. Part I deals with background material in the acoustic theory of speech production, acoustic-phonetics, and signal representation. Part II describes algorithmic aspects of speech recognition systems including pattern classification, search algorithms, stochastic modelling, and language modelling techniques. Part III compares and contrasts the various approaches to speech recognition, and describes advanced techniques used for acoustic-phonetic modelling, robust speech recognition, speaker adaptation, processing paralinguistic information, speech understanding, and multimodal processing. Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. 6.345 introduces students to the rapidly developing field of automatic speech recognition. Its content is divided into three parts. Part I deals with background material in the acoustic theory of speech production, acoustic-phonetics, and signal representation. Part II describes algorithmic aspects of speech recognition systems including pattern classification, search algorithms, stochastic modelling, and language modelling techniques. Part III compares and contrasts the various approaches to speech recognition, and describes advanced techniques used for acoustic-phonetic modelling, robust speech recognition, speaker adaptation, processing paralinguistic information, speech understanding, and multimodal processing.

Subjects

speech recognition | speech recognition | automatic speech recognition | automatic speech recognition | acoustic theory | acoustic theory | speech production | speech production | acoustic-phonetics | acoustic-phonetics | signal representation | signal representation | pattern classification | pattern classification | search algorithms | search algorithms | stochastic modelling | stochastic modelling | language modelling | language modelling | speaker adaptation | speaker adaptation | paralinguistic information | paralinguistic information | speech understanding | speech understanding | multimodal processing | multimodal processing

License

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9.591J Language Processing (MIT) 9.591J Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations. This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | language | language | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | storage | storage | access | access | Speech processing | Speech processing | computation | computation | Ambiguity | Ambiguity | connectionist models | connectionist models | thought | thought | acquisition | acquisition | critical period phenomena | critical period phenomena | acquisition of speech | acquisition of speech | word acquisition | word acquisition | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | neural imaging methods | neural imaging methods | 9.591 | 9.591 | 24.945 | 24.945

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9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT) 9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports. Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | structure | structure | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | storage | storage | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | Ambiguity resolution | Ambiguity resolution | computational modeling | computational modeling | connectionist models | connectionist models | critical period | critical period | Speech acquisition | Speech acquisition | word acquisition | word acquisition | self-paced reading | self-paced reading | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | maging | maging | language acquisition | language acquisition

License

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1.201J Transportation Systems Analysis: Demand and Economics (MIT) 1.201J Transportation Systems Analysis: Demand and Economics (MIT)

Description

The main objective of this course is to give broad insight into the different facets of transportation systems, while providing a solid introduction to transportation demand and cost analyses. As part of the core in the Master of Science in Transportation program, the course will not focus on a specific transportation mode but will use the various modes to apply the theoretical and analytical concepts presented in the lectures and readings. Introduces transportation systems analysis, stressing demand and economic aspects. Covers the key principles governing transportation planning, investment, operations and maintenance. Introduces the microeconomic concepts central to transportation systems. Topics covered include economic theories of the firm, the consumer, and the market, demand models, The main objective of this course is to give broad insight into the different facets of transportation systems, while providing a solid introduction to transportation demand and cost analyses. As part of the core in the Master of Science in Transportation program, the course will not focus on a specific transportation mode but will use the various modes to apply the theoretical and analytical concepts presented in the lectures and readings. Introduces transportation systems analysis, stressing demand and economic aspects. Covers the key principles governing transportation planning, investment, operations and maintenance. Introduces the microeconomic concepts central to transportation systems. Topics covered include economic theories of the firm, the consumer, and the market, demand models,

Subjects

1.201 | 1.201 | 11.545 | 11.545 | ESD.210 | ESD.210 | transportation | transportation | travel demand | travel demand | organizational models | organizational models | consumer theory | consumer theory | project finance | project finance | intelligent transportation systems | intelligent transportation systems | project evaluation | project evaluation | demand modelling | demand modelling | technology | technology | environmental | environmental | energy | energy | economic development | economic development | sustainability | sustainability | urban structure | urban structure | land use | land use | equity | equity | transportation components | transportation components | intermodal combinations | intermodal combinations | quantitative modeling | quantitative modeling | strategic regional planning | strategic regional planning | institutional change analysis | institutional change analysis | large-scale systems | large-scale systems

License

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9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT) 9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports. Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | structure | structure | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | storage | storage | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | Ambiguity resolution | Ambiguity resolution | computational modeling | computational modeling | connectionist models | connectionist models | critical period | critical period | Speech acquisition | Speech acquisition | word acquisition | word acquisition | self-paced reading | self-paced reading | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | maging | maging | language acquisition | language acquisition

License

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1.201J Introduction to Transportation Systems (MIT) 1.201J Introduction to Transportation Systems (MIT)

Description

1.201J/11.545J/ESD.210J is required for all first-year Master of Science in Transportation students. It would be of interest to, as well as accessible to, students in Urban Studies and Planning, Political Science, Technology and Policy, Management, and various engineering departments. It is a good subject for those who plan to take only one subject in transportation and serves as an entry point to other transportation subjects as well. The subject focuses on fundamental principles of transportation systems, introduces transportation systems components and networks, and addresses how one invests in and operates them effectively. The tie between transportation and related systems is emphasized. 1.201J/11.545J/ESD.210J is required for all first-year Master of Science in Transportation students. It would be of interest to, as well as accessible to, students in Urban Studies and Planning, Political Science, Technology and Policy, Management, and various engineering departments. It is a good subject for those who plan to take only one subject in transportation and serves as an entry point to other transportation subjects as well. The subject focuses on fundamental principles of transportation systems, introduces transportation systems components and networks, and addresses how one invests in and operates them effectively. The tie between transportation and related systems is emphasized.

Subjects

1.201 | 1.201 | 11.545 | 11.545 | ESD.210 | ESD.210 | transportation | technology | environmental | energy | economic development | sustainability | urban structure | land use | equity | transportation components | modes | intermodal combinations | quantitative modeling | strategic regional planning | institutional change analysis | CLIOS | large-scale systems | transportation | technology | environmental | energy | economic development | sustainability | urban structure | land use | equity | transportation components | modes | intermodal combinations | quantitative modeling | strategic regional planning | institutional change analysis | CLIOS | large-scale systems

License

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1.221J Transportation Systems (MIT) 1.221J Transportation Systems (MIT)

Description

Approaching transportation as a complex, large-scale, integrated, open system (CLIOS), this course strives to be an interdisciplinary systems subject in the "open" sense. It introduces qualitative modeling ideas and various techniques and philosophies of modeling complex transportation enterprises. It also introduces conceptual frameworks for qualitative analysis, such as frameworks for regional strategic planning, institutional change analysis, and new technology development and deployment. And it covers transportation as a large-scale, integrated system that interacts directly with the social, political, and economic aspects of contemporary society. Fundamental elements and issues shaping traveler and freight transportation systems are covered, along with underlying principles governin Approaching transportation as a complex, large-scale, integrated, open system (CLIOS), this course strives to be an interdisciplinary systems subject in the "open" sense. It introduces qualitative modeling ideas and various techniques and philosophies of modeling complex transportation enterprises. It also introduces conceptual frameworks for qualitative analysis, such as frameworks for regional strategic planning, institutional change analysis, and new technology development and deployment. And it covers transportation as a large-scale, integrated system that interacts directly with the social, political, and economic aspects of contemporary society. Fundamental elements and issues shaping traveler and freight transportation systems are covered, along with underlying principles governin

Subjects

transportation systems | transportation systems | large-scale integrated systems | large-scale integrated systems | passenger transportation systems | passenger transportation systems | freight transportation systems | freight transportation systems | transportation planning | transportation planning | transportation investment | transportation investment | transportation operations | transportation operations | transportation maintenance | transportation maintenance | system performance | system performance | level of service metrics | level of service metrics | level of service determinants | level of service determinants | design of transportation services | design of transportation services | intermodal transportation | intermodal transportation | 1.221 | 1.221 | 11.527 | 11.527 | ESD.201 | ESD.201 | 11.527J11.527 | 11.527J11.527

License

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