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SP.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT) SP.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry. Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Subjects

mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | Greek philosophy | Greek philosophy | Plato | Plato | Euclid | Euclid | Aristotle | Aristotle | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Nicomachus | Nicomachus | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | number | number | irrational number | irrational number | ratio | ratio | ethics | ethics | logos | logos | logic | logic | ancient knowing | ancient knowing | modern knowing | modern knowing | Greek conception of number | Greek conception of number | idea of number | idea of number | courage | courage | justice | justice | pursuit of truth | pursuit of truth | truth as a surd | truth as a surd

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.SP.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT) ES.SP.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry. Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Subjects

mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | Greek philosophy | Greek philosophy | Plato | Plato | Euclid | Euclid | Aristotle | Aristotle | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Nicomachus | Nicomachus | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | number | number | irrational number | irrational number | ratio | ratio | ethics | ethics | logos | logos | logic | logic | ancient knowing | ancient knowing | modern knowing | modern knowing | Greek conception of number | Greek conception of number | idea of number | idea of number | courage | courage | justice | justice | pursuit of truth | pursuit of truth | truth as a surd | truth as a surd

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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ES.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT) ES.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry. Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Subjects

mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | Greek philosophy | Greek philosophy | Plato | Plato | Euclid | Euclid | Aristotle | Aristotle | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Nicomachus | Nicomachus | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | number | number | irrational number | irrational number | ratio | ratio | ethics | ethics | logos | logos | logic | logic | ancient knowing | ancient knowing | modern knowing | modern knowing | Greek conception of number | Greek conception of number | idea of number | idea of number | courage | courage | justice | justice | pursuit of truth | pursuit of truth | truth as a surd | truth as a surd

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-ES.xml

Attribution

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ES.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT) ES.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry. Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Subjects

mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | Greek philosophy | Greek philosophy | Plato | Plato | Euclid | Euclid | Aristotle | Aristotle | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Nicomachus | Nicomachus | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | number | number | irrational number | irrational number | ratio | ratio | ethics | ethics | logos | logos | logic | logic | ancient knowing | ancient knowing | modern knowing | modern knowing | Greek conception of number | Greek conception of number | idea of number | idea of number | courage | courage | justice | justice | pursuit of truth | pursuit of truth | truth as a surd | truth as a surd

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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ES.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Subjects

mathematics | geometry | history | philosophy | Greek philosophy | Plato | Euclid | Aristotle | Rene Descartes | Nicomachus | Francis Bacon | number | irrational number | ratio | ethics | logos | logic | ancient knowing | modern knowing | Greek conception of number | idea of number | courage | justice | pursuit of truth | truth as a surd

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

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