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4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT) 4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and so-called "primitive" art. This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and so-called "primitive" art.

Subjects

modern art; high art; mass culture; modernist aesthetic; modernism; 19th Century Art; 20th Century Art; modernization; urbanization; globalization; photography; cinema; painting; sculpture; postmodernism; visual arts; multimedia; pop art; popular culture | modern art; high art; mass culture; modernist aesthetic; modernism; 19th Century Art; 20th Century Art; modernization; urbanization; globalization; photography; cinema; painting; sculpture; postmodernism; visual arts; multimedia; pop art; popular culture | modern art | modern art | high art | high art | mass culture | mass culture | modernist aesthetic | modernist aesthetic | modernism | modernism | 19th Century Art | 19th Century Art | 20th Century Art | 20th Century Art | modernization | modernization | urbanization | urbanization | globalization | globalization | photography | photography | cinema | cinema | painting | painting | sculpture | sculpture | postmodernism | postmodernism | visual arts | visual arts | multimedia | multimedia | pop art | pop art | popular culture | popular culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT) 4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art, including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, prints, performance and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and "primitive" art. This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art, including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, prints, performance and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and "primitive" art.

Subjects

modern art | modern art | high art | high art | mass culture | mass culture | modernist aesthetic | modernist aesthetic | modernism | modernism | 19th Century Art | 19th Century Art | 20th Century Art | 20th Century Art | modernization | modernization | urbanization | urbanization | globalization | globalization | photography | photography | cinema | cinema | painting | painting | sculpture | sculpture | postmodernism | postmodernism | visual arts | visual arts | multimedia | multimedia | pop art | pop art | popular culture | popular culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT) SP.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT)

Description

This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few. This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few.

Subjects

passing | passing | race | race | gender | gender | class | class | literacy | literacy | American literature | American literature | queer | queer | genderqueer | genderqueer | transgender | transgender | Nella Larsen | Nella Larsen | Michel Foucault | Michel Foucault | sexuality | sexuality | Judith Butler | Judith Butler | transsexual | transsexual | William Craft | William Craft | Ellen Craft | Ellen Craft | modernism | modernism | post-modernism | post-modernism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Literature and Urban Experience (MIT) 21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Literature and Urban Experience (MIT)

Description

Alienation, overcrowding, sensory overload, homelessness, criminality, violence, loneliness, sprawl, blight. How have the realities of city living influenced literature's formal and thematic techniques? How useful is it to think of literature as its own kind of "map" of urban space? Are cities too grand, heterogeneous, and shifting to be captured by writers? In this seminar we will seek answers to these questions in key city literature, and in theoretical works that endeavor to understand the culture of cities. Alienation, overcrowding, sensory overload, homelessness, criminality, violence, loneliness, sprawl, blight. How have the realities of city living influenced literature's formal and thematic techniques? How useful is it to think of literature as its own kind of "map" of urban space? Are cities too grand, heterogeneous, and shifting to be captured by writers? In this seminar we will seek answers to these questions in key city literature, and in theoretical works that endeavor to understand the culture of cities.

Subjects

urban | urban | literature | literature | urban experience | urban experience | city | city | The Waste Land | The Waste Land | Mrs. Dalloway | Mrs. Dalloway | Belfast Confetti | Belfast Confetti | Ripley Bogle | Ripley Bogle | The Lonely Londoners | The Lonely Londoners | modernity | modernity | modern | modern | modernism | modernism | metropolis | metropolis | postmodernism | postmodernism | the gunny sack | the gunny sack

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.SP.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT) ES.SP.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT)

Description

This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few. This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few.

Subjects

passing | passing | race | race | gender | gender | class | class | literacy | literacy | American literature | American literature | queer | queer | genderqueer | genderqueer | transgender | transgender | Nella Larsen | Nella Larsen | Michel Foucault | Michel Foucault | sexuality | sexuality | Judith Butler | Judith Butler | transsexual | transsexual | William Craft | William Craft | Ellen Craft | Ellen Craft | modernism | modernism | post-modernism | post-modernism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT) ES.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT)

Description

This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few. This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few.

Subjects

passing | passing | race | race | gender | gender | class | class | literacy | literacy | American literature | American literature | queer | queer | genderqueer | genderqueer | transgender | transgender | Nella Larsen | Nella Larsen | Michel Foucault | Michel Foucault | sexuality | sexuality | Judith Butler | Judith Butler | transsexual | transsexual | William Craft | William Craft | Ellen Craft | Ellen Craft | modernism | modernism | post-modernism | post-modernism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and so-called "primitive" art.

Subjects

modern art; high art; mass culture; modernist aesthetic; modernism; 19th Century Art; 20th Century Art; modernization; urbanization; globalization; photography; cinema; painting; sculpture; postmodernism; visual arts; multimedia; pop art; popular culture | modern art | high art | mass culture | modernist aesthetic | modernism | 19th Century Art | 20th Century Art | modernization | urbanization | globalization | photography | cinema | painting | sculpture | postmodernism | visual arts | multimedia | pop art | popular culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches. We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches.

Subjects

primary sources | primary sources | women's studies | women's studies | gender history | gender history | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | media studies | media studies | visual culture | visual culture | environmental history | environmental history | postmodernism | postmodernism | microhistory | microhistory | digital humanities | digital humanities | national history | national history | borders | borders | frontier | frontier | global history | global history | imperialism | imperialism | historiography | historiography | analytical framework | analytical framework

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.651 Art Since 1940 (MIT) 4.651 Art Since 1940 (MIT)

Description

This subject focuses on the objects, history, context, and critical discussion surrounding art since World War II. Because of the burgeoning increase in art production, the course is necessarily selective. We will trace major developments and movements in art up to the present, primarily from the US; but we will also be looking at art from Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as art "on the margins" — art that has been overlooked by the mainstream critical press, but may have a broad cultural base in its own community. We will ask what function art serves in its various cultures of origin, and why art has been such a lightning rod for political issues around the world. This subject focuses on the objects, history, context, and critical discussion surrounding art since World War II. Because of the burgeoning increase in art production, the course is necessarily selective. We will trace major developments and movements in art up to the present, primarily from the US; but we will also be looking at art from Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as art "on the margins" — art that has been overlooked by the mainstream critical press, but may have a broad cultural base in its own community. We will ask what function art serves in its various cultures of origin, and why art has been such a lightning rod for political issues around the world.

Subjects

contemporary art | contemporary art | modernism | modernism | minimalist art | minimalist art | Warhol's factory | Warhol's factory | Jackson Pollock | Jackson Pollock | painting | painting | expression | expression | art and politics | art and politics | fluxus | fluxus

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art, including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, prints, performance and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and "primitive" art.

Subjects

modern art | high art | mass culture | modernist aesthetic | modernism | 19th Century Art | 20th Century Art | modernization | urbanization | globalization | photography | cinema | painting | sculpture | postmodernism | visual arts | multimedia | pop art | popular culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history. This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history.

Subjects

primary sources | primary sources | gender history | gender history | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | media studies | media studies | visual culture | visual culture | environmental history | environmental history | postmodernism | postmodernism | microhistory | microhistory | digital humanities | digital humanities | national history | national history | borders | borders | frontier | frontier | global history | global history | imperialism | imperialism | historiography | historiography | analytical framework | analytical framework | agrarian history | agrarian history | historical demography | historical demography | European history | European history | American history | American history | Asian history | Asian history | maps | maps | African history | African history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.220 Urban Housing: Paris, London, New York (MIT) 4.220 Urban Housing: Paris, London, New York (MIT)

Description

This class presents an analysis of the development of housing models and their urban implications in Paris, London, and New York City from the seventeenth century to the present. The focus will be on three models: the French hotel, the London row house, and the New York City tenement and apartment building. Other topics covered will include twentieth-century housing reform movements and work by the London County Council, CIAM, and American public housing agencies. This class presents an analysis of the development of housing models and their urban implications in Paris, London, and New York City from the seventeenth century to the present. The focus will be on three models: the French hotel, the London row house, and the New York City tenement and apartment building. Other topics covered will include twentieth-century housing reform movements and work by the London County Council, CIAM, and American public housing agencies.

Subjects

housing | housing | urban planning | urban planning | city development | city development | urban history | urban history | seventeenth century to the present | seventeenth century to the present | New York City | New York City | London | London | Paris | Paris | tenements | tenements | slums | slums | row houses | row houses | court and garden | court and garden | country estate | country estate | urban development | urban development | modernism | modernism | city planning | city planning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.002-3 Foundations of Western Culture II: Modernism (MIT) 21L.002-3 Foundations of Western Culture II: Modernism (MIT)

Description

This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice an This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice an

Subjects

Western culture | Western culture | foundations | foundations | modernism | modernism | texts | texts | literary | literary | philosophical | philosophical | sociological | sociological | secular humanism | secular humanism | human events | human events | individual | individual | social | social | communal purpose | communal purpose | common | common | cultural | cultural | possession | possession | ancient | ancient | modern world | modern world | discussion | discussion | action | action | characters | characters | voice | voice | form | form

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.665 Contemporary Architecture and Critical Debate (MIT) 4.665 Contemporary Architecture and Critical Debate (MIT)

Description

This class, required of all Master of Architecture students, presents a critical review of works, theories, and polemics in architecture in the aftermath of World War II. The aim is to present a historical understanding of the period, and to develop a meaningful framework to assess contemporary issues in architecture. Special attention will be paid to historiographic questions of how architects construe the terms of their "present." This class, required of all Master of Architecture students, presents a critical review of works, theories, and polemics in architecture in the aftermath of World War II. The aim is to present a historical understanding of the period, and to develop a meaningful framework to assess contemporary issues in architecture. Special attention will be paid to historiographic questions of how architects construe the terms of their "present."

Subjects

architecture | architecture | theory | theory | practice | practice | globalization | globalization | historiography | historiography | phenomenology | phenomenology | nationalism | nationalism | color | color | drawing | drawing | ornament | ornament | structure | structure | construction | construction | material | material | inhabitation | inhabitation | gender | gender | class | class | race | race | design | design | modernism | modernism | classicism | classicism | philosophy | philosophy | works | works | polemics | polemics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.645 Selected Topics in Architecture: Architecture from 1750 to the Present (MIT) 4.645 Selected Topics in Architecture: Architecture from 1750 to the Present (MIT)

Description

This class is a general study of modern architecture as a response to important technological, cultural, environmental, aesthetic, and theoretical challenges after the European Enlightenment. It focuses on the theoretical, historiographic, and design approaches to architectural problems encountered in the age of industrial and post-industrial expansion across the globe, with specific attention to the dominance of European modernism in setting the agenda for the discourse of a global modernity at large. It explores modern architectural history through thematic exposition rather than as a simple chronological succession of ideas. This class is a general study of modern architecture as a response to important technological, cultural, environmental, aesthetic, and theoretical challenges after the European Enlightenment. It focuses on the theoretical, historiographic, and design approaches to architectural problems encountered in the age of industrial and post-industrial expansion across the globe, with specific attention to the dominance of European modernism in setting the agenda for the discourse of a global modernity at large. It explores modern architectural history through thematic exposition rather than as a simple chronological succession of ideas.

Subjects

architecture | architecture | theory | theory | practice | practice | globalization | globalization | historiography | historiography | phenomenology | phenomenology | nationalism | nationalism | color | color | drawing | drawing | ornament | ornament | structure | structure | construction | construction | material | material | inhabitation | inhabitation | gender | gender | class | class | race | race | design | design | modernism | modernism | classicism | classicism | philosophy | philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Literature and Urban Experience (MIT)

Description

Alienation, overcrowding, sensory overload, homelessness, criminality, violence, loneliness, sprawl, blight. How have the realities of city living influenced literature's formal and thematic techniques? How useful is it to think of literature as its own kind of "map" of urban space? Are cities too grand, heterogeneous, and shifting to be captured by writers? In this seminar we will seek answers to these questions in key city literature, and in theoretical works that endeavor to understand the culture of cities.

Subjects

urban | literature | urban experience | city | The Waste Land | Mrs. Dalloway | Belfast Confetti | Ripley Bogle | The Lonely Londoners | modernity | modern | modernism | metropolis | postmodernism | the gunny sack

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Literature and State Censorship: A literary perspective

Description

Peter McDonald and Elleke Bohemer discuss state censorship from a literary perspective; also discussing the issues of nationalism, modernism and Apartheid.

Subjects

literature | south africa | apartheid | racism | modernism | #greatwriters | censorship | nationalism | literature | south africa | apartheid | racism | modernism | #greatwriters | censorship | nationalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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4.665 Contemporary Architecture and Critical Debate (MIT) 4.665 Contemporary Architecture and Critical Debate (MIT)

Description

This class, required of all Master of Architecture students, presents a critical review of works, theories, and polemics in architecture in the aftermath of World War II. The aim is to present a historical understanding of the period, and to develop a meaningful framework to assess contemporary issues in architecture. Special attention will be paid to historiographic questions of how architects construe the terms of their "present." This class, required of all Master of Architecture students, presents a critical review of works, theories, and polemics in architecture in the aftermath of World War II. The aim is to present a historical understanding of the period, and to develop a meaningful framework to assess contemporary issues in architecture. Special attention will be paid to historiographic questions of how architects construe the terms of their "present."

Subjects

architecture | architecture | theory | theory | practice | practice | globalization | globalization | historiography | historiography | phenomenology | phenomenology | nationalism | nationalism | color | color | drawing | drawing | ornament | ornament | structure | structure | construction | construction | material | material | inhabitation | inhabitation | gender | gender | class | class | race | race | design | design | modernism | modernism | classicism | classicism | philosophy | philosophy | works | works | polemics | polemics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Katherine Mansfield and Rhythm Magazine

Description

Dr Faith Binckes explains why modernist short story writer and critic Katherine Mansfield (1888-1923) is a great writer, highlighting her involvement with the 1911-1913 periodical Rhythm, edited by her second husband John Middleton Murry. Dr Binckes discusses how three stories from 1912 - 'The Woman at the Store', 'How Pearl Button Was Kidnapped', and 'Sunday Lunch' - illustrate different facets of Mansfield's writing. Though she has in the past been considered a domestic writer of women's and children's concerns, these earlier versions of stories play with a colonial New Zealand setting (later written out), deal with fairytale and race, and poke fun at the London literati, respectively. Katherine Mansfield was originally from New Zealand but came to London in 1903. She was a pro Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | Rhythm Magazine | poetry | modernism | literature | Katherine Mansfield | #greatwriters | Rhythm Magazine | poetry | modernism | literature | Katherine Mansfield

License

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Julian Thompson on Rudyard Kipling

Description

Dr Julian Thompson considers a writer described by Kingsley Amis as 'our greatest writer of short stories'. In this discussion of Rudyard Kipling, Julian acknowledges Kipling's lack popularity with readers, but argues for the greatness of short stories from across his ouvre and positions them as precursors to modernism. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | anglo-Indian writing | T.S. Eliot | Chaucerian forgery | modernism | Victorian | Rudyard Kipling | short stories | #greatwriters | anglo-Indian writing | T.S. Eliot | Chaucerian forgery | modernism | Victorian | Rudyard Kipling | short stories

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21L.709 Studies in Literary History: Modernism: From Nietzsche to Fellini (MIT) 21L.709 Studies in Literary History: Modernism: From Nietzsche to Fellini (MIT)

Description

How do literature, philosophy, film and other arts respond to the profound changes in world view and lifestyle that mark the twentieth century? This course considers a broad range of works from different countries, different media, and different genres, in exploring the transition to a decentered "Einsteinian" universe. How do literature, philosophy, film and other arts respond to the profound changes in world view and lifestyle that mark the twentieth century? This course considers a broad range of works from different countries, different media, and different genres, in exploring the transition to a decentered "Einsteinian" universe.

Subjects

modernism | modernism | transition to a decentered “Einsteinian” universe | transition to a decentered “Einsteinian” universe | Friedrich Nietzsche | Friedrich Nietzsche | Paul Cézanne | Paul Cézanne | Arnold Schoenberg | Arnold Schoenberg | James Joyce | James Joyce | Franz Kafka | Franz Kafka | Fritz Lang | Fritz Lang | Federico Fellini | Federico Fellini | literary history | literary history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture: The Making of the Modern World (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture: The Making of the Modern World (MIT)

Description

This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice and form. This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice and form.

Subjects

Western culture | Western culture | foundations | foundations | modernism | modernism | texts | texts | literary | literary | philosophical | philosophical | sociological | sociological | secular humanism | secular humanism | human events | human events | individual | individual | social | social | communal purpose | communal purpose | common | common | cultural | cultural | possession | possession | ancient | ancient | modern world | modern world | discussion | discussion | action | action | characters | characters | voice | voice | form | form

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Katherine Mansfield and Rhythm Magazine

Description

Dr Faith Binckes explains why modernist short story writer and critic Katherine Mansfield (1888-1923) is a great writer, highlighting her involvement with the 1911-1913 periodical Rhythm, edited by her second husband John Middleton Murry. Dr Binckes discusses how three stories from 1912 - 'The Woman at the Store', 'How Pearl Button Was Kidnapped', and 'Sunday Lunch' - illustrate different facets of Mansfield's writing. Though she has in the past been considered a domestic writer of women's and children's concerns, these earlier versions of stories play with a colonial New Zealand setting (later written out), deal with fairytale and race, and poke fun at the London literati, respectively. Katherine Mansfield was originally from New Zealand but came to London in 1903. She was a pro Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | Rhythm Magazine | poetry | modernism | literature | Katherine Mansfield | #greatwriters | Rhythm Magazine | poetry | modernism | literature | Katherine Mansfield

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Introduction to Music

Description

This course provides an introductory survey of the Western classical tradition, exploring music as a phenomenon of both sound and culture. The focus of this course is the development of aural skills that lead to an understanding and appreciation of music; making use of live performances and streaming audio available on the Internet, the student will listen to and explore some of the most important and influential repertoires and genres of music that emerged in the last four centuries. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Music 101)

Subjects

music | listen | rhythm | melody | harmony | instrument | genre | theme | variation | style | medieval | renaissance | baroque | bach | handel | classical | mozart | enlightenment | romanticism | impressionism | exoticism | modernism | mahler | stravinksy | copland | ives | postmodernism | design | W000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Lecture 27: Games as Art Lecture 27: Games as Art

Description

Description: Games have emerged in recent decades as a rich artistic medium, combining elements from audiovisual, interactive, and performance art traditions. Abe Stein talks about aesthetics and meaning in games, and their relation to various modern art movements. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Abe Stein (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: aesthetics, postmodernism, social commentary, abstraction, performance art, Yoko Ono, simulation, Fluxus, event score, interactive art, fine art, representation, virtual economy, satire, geocaching, alternative reality games, art games, pop culture, video gamesTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Games have emerged in recent decades as a rich artistic medium, combining elements from audiovisual, interactive, and performance art traditions. Abe Stein talks about aesthetics and meaning in games, and their relation to various modern art movements. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Abe Stein (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: aesthetics, postmodernism, social commentary, abstraction, performance art, Yoko Ono, simulation, Fluxus, event score, interactive art, fine art, representation, virtual economy, satire, geocaching, alternative reality games, art games, pop culture, video gamesTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

aesthetics | aesthetics | postmodernism | postmodernism | social commentary | social commentary | abstraction | abstraction | performance art | performance art | Yoko Ono | Yoko Ono | simulation | simulation | Fluxus | Fluxus | event score | event score | interactive art | interactive art | fine art | fine art | representation | representation | virtual economy | virtual economy | satire | satire | geocaching | geocaching | alternative reality games | alternative reality games | art games | art games | pop culture | pop culture | video games | video games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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