Searching for modernity : 25 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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CMS.801 Media in Transition (MIT) CMS.801 Media in Transition (MIT)

Description

This course centers on historical eras in which the form and function of media technologies were radically transformed. It includes consideration of the "Gutenberg Revolution," the rise of modern mass media, and the "digital revolution," among other case studies of media transformation and cultural change. Readings cover cultural and social history and historiographic methods. This course centers on historical eras in which the form and function of media technologies were radically transformed. It includes consideration of the "Gutenberg Revolution," the rise of modern mass media, and the "digital revolution," among other case studies of media transformation and cultural change. Readings cover cultural and social history and historiographic methods.

Subjects

Media | Media | mass media | mass media | history | history | Gutenberg | Gutenberg | cultural change | cultural change | cultural history | cultural history | social history | social history | historiographic method | historiographic method | books | books | medieval history | medieval history | codex book | codex book | writing | writing | printing | printing | printing press | printing press | stage | stage | theater | theater | renaissance | renaissance | romanticism | romanticism | modernity | modernity | inventions | inventions | photography | photography | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | image | image | telegraph | telegraph | electrification | electrification | communication | communication | Morse | Morse | Daguerreotype | Daguerreotype | Fox Talbot | Fox Talbot | phonograph | phonograph | sound recording | sound recording | radio | radio | broadcasting | broadcasting | film | film | video | video | cinema | cinema | publishing | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.049J Technology and Gender in American History (MIT) STS.049J Technology and Gender in American History (MIT)

Description

This course centers on the changing relationships between men, women, and technology in American history. Topics include theories of gender, technologies of production and consumption, the gendering of public and private space, men's and women's roles in science and technology, the effects of industrialization on sexual divisions of labor, gender and identity at home and at work. This course centers on the changing relationships between men, women, and technology in American history. Topics include theories of gender, technologies of production and consumption, the gendering of public and private space, men's and women's roles in science and technology, the effects of industrialization on sexual divisions of labor, gender and identity at home and at work.

Subjects

history | history | gender | gender | american history | american history | technology | technology | history of technology | history of technology | culture | culture | identity | identity | twentieth century | twentieth century | modern | modern | industrialization | industrialization | demographics | demographics | women | women | systems | systems | modernity | modernity | STS.049 | STS.049

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.325 Small Wonders: Media, Modernity, and the Moment: Experiments in Time (MIT) 21L.325 Small Wonders: Media, Modernity, and the Moment: Experiments in Time (MIT)

Description

The "small wonders" to which our course will attend are moments of present time, depicted in the verbal and visual media of the modern age: newspapers, novels and stories, poems, photographs, films, etc. We will move between visual and verbal media across a considerable span of time, from eighteenth-century poetry and prose fiction to twenty-first century social networking and microblogging sites, and from sculpture to photography, film, and digital visual media. With help from philosophers, contemporary cultural historians, and others, we will begin to think about a media practice largely taken for granted in our own moment. The "small wonders" to which our course will attend are moments of present time, depicted in the verbal and visual media of the modern age: newspapers, novels and stories, poems, photographs, films, etc. We will move between visual and verbal media across a considerable span of time, from eighteenth-century poetry and prose fiction to twenty-first century social networking and microblogging sites, and from sculpture to photography, film, and digital visual media. With help from philosophers, contemporary cultural historians, and others, we will begin to think about a media practice largely taken for granted in our own moment.

Subjects

media | media | modernity | modernity | moment | moment | Jonathan Swift | Jonathan Swift | William Wordsworth | William Wordsworth | John Keats | John Keats | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | short texts | short texts | short visual works | short visual works | short films | short films

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Literature and Urban Experience (MIT) 21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Literature and Urban Experience (MIT)

Description

Alienation, overcrowding, sensory overload, homelessness, criminality, violence, loneliness, sprawl, blight. How have the realities of city living influenced literature's formal and thematic techniques? How useful is it to think of literature as its own kind of "map" of urban space? Are cities too grand, heterogeneous, and shifting to be captured by writers? In this seminar we will seek answers to these questions in key city literature, and in theoretical works that endeavor to understand the culture of cities. Alienation, overcrowding, sensory overload, homelessness, criminality, violence, loneliness, sprawl, blight. How have the realities of city living influenced literature's formal and thematic techniques? How useful is it to think of literature as its own kind of "map" of urban space? Are cities too grand, heterogeneous, and shifting to be captured by writers? In this seminar we will seek answers to these questions in key city literature, and in theoretical works that endeavor to understand the culture of cities.

Subjects

urban | urban | literature | literature | urban experience | urban experience | city | city | The Waste Land | The Waste Land | Mrs. Dalloway | Mrs. Dalloway | Belfast Confetti | Belfast Confetti | Ripley Bogle | Ripley Bogle | The Lonely Londoners | The Lonely Londoners | modernity | modernity | modern | modern | modernism | modernism | metropolis | metropolis | postmodernism | postmodernism | the gunny sack | the gunny sack

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.547 Government and Politics of China (MIT) 17.547 Government and Politics of China (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes contemporary Chinese politics, both pre-Communist and Communist. It focuses on the process of modernization and political development of Chinese civilization. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject at greater depth through reading and individual research. This course analyzes contemporary Chinese politics, both pre-Communist and Communist. It focuses on the process of modernization and political development of Chinese civilization. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject at greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

People's Republic of China | People's Republic of China | quest for modernity | quest for modernity | modernization | modernization | relationship between citizen and state | relationship between citizen and state | PRC | PRC | PRC politics | PRC politics | China's political system | China's political system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT) CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT)

Description

Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp

Subjects

hacking | hacking | trolling | trolling | hacker | hacker | troll | troll | mass-murder | mass-murder | bully | bully | deviance | deviance | deviant | deviant | new media | new media | old media | old media | middle-aged media | middle-aged media | media | media | technology | technology | behavior | behavior | otaku | otaku | artifact | artifact | politics | politics | society | society | outsiders | outsiders | marihuana | marihuana | control | control | moral | moral | panic | panic | writing | writing | print | print | plato | plato | phaedrus | phaedrus | jowett | jowett | conciousness | conciousness | orality | orality | literacy | literacy | anxieties | anxieties | anxiety | anxiety | modernity | modernity | penny | penny | dreadful | dreadful | juvenile | juvenile | crime | crime | delinquency | delinquency | delinquent | delinquent | children | children | television | television | chip | chip | regulation | regulation | seduction | seduction | innocence | innocence | innocent | innocent | movies | movies | film | film | Marx | Marx | Engles | Engles | Jenkins | Jenkins | ruling | ruling | lass | lass | gender | gender | youth | youth | sex | sex | violence | violence | digital | digital | threat | threat | treat | treat | affect | affect | virus | virus | body | body | stupid | stupid | facebook | facebook | bookface | bookface | google | google | internet | internet | book | book | identity | identity | deception | deception | virtual | virtual | community | community | flesh | flesh | reddit | reddit | vigilante | vigilante | weirdness | weirdness | crackdown | crackdown | Sterling | Sterling | Doctorow | Doctorow | pornography | pornography | predator | predator | porn | porn | terror | terror | terrorism | terrorism | grief | grief | resistance | resistance | drama | drama | teen | teen | gossip | gossip | network | network | public | public | private | private | video | video | game | game | videogame | videogame | columbine | columbine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.00 Introduction to Anthropology (MIT) 21A.00 Introduction to Anthropology (MIT)

Description

Through the comparative study of different cultures, anthropology explores fundamental questions about what it means to be human. It seeks to understand how culture both shapes societies, from the smallest island in the South Pacific to the largest Asian metropolis, and affects the way institutions work, from scientific laboratories to Christian mega-churches. This course will provide a framework for analyzing diverse facets of human experience such as gender, ethnicity, language, politics, economics, and art.  Through the comparative study of different cultures, anthropology explores fundamental questions about what it means to be human. It seeks to understand how culture both shapes societies, from the smallest island in the South Pacific to the largest Asian metropolis, and affects the way institutions work, from scientific laboratories to Christian mega-churches. This course will provide a framework for analyzing diverse facets of human experience such as gender, ethnicity, language, politics, economics, and art. 

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | Social Science | Social Science | humanities | humanities | culture | culture | society | society | gender | gender | ethnicity | ethnicity | race | race | language | language | politics | politics | economics | economics | art | art | identity | identity | Capoeira | Capoeira | tradition | tradition | modernity | modernity | communication | communication | expressive culture | expressive culture | magic | magic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CC.111 Modern Conceptions of Freedom (MIT) CC.111 Modern Conceptions of Freedom (MIT)

Description

This course examines the modern definition of freedom, and the obligations that people accept in honoring it. It investigates how these obligations are captured in the principles of our political associations. This course also studies how the centrality of freedom plays out in the political thought of such authors as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke and Montesquieu, as well as debating which notions of freedom inspire and sustain the American experiment by careful reading of the documents and arguments of the founding of the United States. This course is part of the Concourse program at MIT. This course examines the modern definition of freedom, and the obligations that people accept in honoring it. It investigates how these obligations are captured in the principles of our political associations. This course also studies how the centrality of freedom plays out in the political thought of such authors as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke and Montesquieu, as well as debating which notions of freedom inspire and sustain the American experiment by careful reading of the documents and arguments of the founding of the United States. This course is part of the Concourse program at MIT.

Subjects

enlightenment | enlightenment | the Constitution | the Constitution | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Hobbes | Hobbes | Locke | Locke | Rousseau | Rousseau | Tocqueville | Tocqueville | Nietzche | Nietzche | founders | founders | liberty | liberty | popular sovereignty | popular sovereignty | human nature | human nature | politics | politics | Leviathan | Leviathan | government | government | Declaration of Independence | Declaration of Independence | American constitutionalism | American constitutionalism | Federalist Papers | Federalist Papers | equality | equality | statesmanship | statesmanship | Lincoln | Lincoln | modernity | modernity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.547 Government and Politics of China (MIT) 17.547 Government and Politics of China (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes contemporary Chinese politics, both pre-Communist and Communist. It focuses on the process of modernization and political development of Chinese civilization. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject at greater depth through reading and individual research. This course analyzes contemporary Chinese politics, both pre-Communist and Communist. It focuses on the process of modernization and political development of Chinese civilization. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject at greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

People's Republic of China | People's Republic of China | quest for modernity | quest for modernity | modernization | modernization | relationship between citizen and state | relationship between citizen and state | PRC | PRC | PRC politics | PRC politics | China's political system | China's political system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT)

Description

Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp

Subjects

hacking | trolling | hacker | troll | mass-murder | bully | deviance | deviant | new media | old media | middle-aged media | media | technology | behavior | otaku | artifact | politics | society | outsiders | marihuana | control | moral | panic | writing | print | plato | phaedrus | jowett | conciousness | orality | literacy | anxieties | anxiety | modernity | penny | dreadful | juvenile | crime | delinquency | delinquent | children | television | chip | regulation | seduction | innocence | innocent | movies | film | Marx | Engles | Jenkins | ruling | lass | gender | youth | sex | violence | digital | threat | treat | affect | virus | body | stupid | facebook | bookface | google | internet | book | identity | deception | virtual | community | flesh | reddit | vigilante | weirdness | crackdown | Sterling | Doctorow | pornography | predator | porn | terror | terrorism | grief | resistance | drama | teen | gossip | network | public | private | video | game | videogame | columbine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SILVA, Denise Ferreira da

Description

Denise Ferreira Da Silva is a critical race scholar whose work emphasises the centrality of race to modern thought. An... read more

Subjects

Thinkers | critical race theory | decoloniality | enlightenment | modernity | race

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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21L.325 Small Wonders: Media, Modernity, and the Moment: Experiments in Time (MIT)

Description

The "small wonders" to which our course will attend are moments of present time, depicted in the verbal and visual media of the modern age: newspapers, novels and stories, poems, photographs, films, etc. We will move between visual and verbal media across a considerable span of time, from eighteenth-century poetry and prose fiction to twenty-first century social networking and microblogging sites, and from sculpture to photography, film, and digital visual media. With help from philosophers, contemporary cultural historians, and others, we will begin to think about a media practice largely taken for granted in our own moment.

Subjects

media | modernity | moment | Jonathan Swift | William Wordsworth | John Keats | Virginia Woolf | short texts | short visual works | short films

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.547 Government and Politics of China (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes contemporary Chinese politics, both pre-Communist and Communist. It focuses on the process of modernization and political development of Chinese civilization. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject at greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

People's Republic of China | quest for modernity | modernization | relationship between citizen and state | PRC | PRC politics | China's political system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Literature and Urban Experience (MIT)

Description

Alienation, overcrowding, sensory overload, homelessness, criminality, violence, loneliness, sprawl, blight. How have the realities of city living influenced literature's formal and thematic techniques? How useful is it to think of literature as its own kind of "map" of urban space? Are cities too grand, heterogeneous, and shifting to be captured by writers? In this seminar we will seek answers to these questions in key city literature, and in theoretical works that endeavor to understand the culture of cities.

Subjects

urban | literature | urban experience | city | The Waste Land | Mrs. Dalloway | Belfast Confetti | Ripley Bogle | The Lonely Londoners | modernity | modern | modernism | metropolis | postmodernism | the gunny sack

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.049J Technology and Gender in American History (MIT)

Description

This course centers on the changing relationships between men, women, and technology in American history. Topics include theories of gender, technologies of production and consumption, the gendering of public and private space, men's and women's roles in science and technology, the effects of industrialization on sexual divisions of labor, gender and identity at home and at work.

Subjects

history | gender | american history | technology | history of technology | culture | identity | twentieth century | modern | industrialization | demographics | women | systems | modernity | STS.049

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT)

Description

Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp

Subjects

hacking | trolling | hacker | troll | mass-murder | bully | deviance | deviant | new media | old media | middle-aged media | media | technology | behavior | otaku | artifact | politics | society | outsiders | marihuana | control | moral | panic | writing | print | plato | phaedrus | jowett | conciousness | orality | literacy | anxieties | anxiety | modernity | penny | dreadful | juvenile | crime | delinquency | delinquent | children | television | chip | regulation | seduction | innocence | innocent | movies | film | Marx | Engles | Jenkins | ruling | lass | gender | youth | sex | violence | digital | threat | treat | affect | virus | body | stupid | facebook | bookface | google | internet | book | identity | deception | virtual | community | flesh | reddit | vigilante | weirdness | crackdown | Sterling | Doctorow | pornography | predator | porn | terror | terrorism | grief | resistance | drama | teen | gossip | network | public | private | video | game | videogame | columbine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Representations (MIT)

Description

We will explore images that pertain to the emergence of Japan as a modern state. We will focus on images that depict Japan as it comes into contact with the rest of the world after its long and deep isolation during the feudal period. We will also cover city planning of Tokyo that took place after WWII, and such topics as the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. A unique feature of this offering is that we will run it concurrently with the edX MOOC and two University of Tokyo MOOCs, Visualizing Postwar Tokyo and Four Faces of Contemporary Japanese Architecture, for much of the remainder of the class.

Subjects

visualizing cultures | visualizing Japan | modern Japanese history | Commodore Matthew C. Perry | Westernization in Japan | modernity in Japan | visualizing postwar Tokyo | Imperial Democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.00 Introduction to Anthropology (MIT)

Description

Through the comparative study of different cultures, anthropology explores fundamental questions about what it means to be human. It seeks to understand how culture both shapes societies, from the smallest island in the South Pacific to the largest Asian metropolis, and affects the way institutions work, from scientific laboratories to Christian mega-churches. This course will provide a framework for analyzing diverse facets of human experience such as gender, ethnicity, language, politics, economics, and art. 

Subjects

anthropology | Social Science | humanities | culture | society | gender | ethnicity | race | language | politics | economics | art | identity | Capoeira | tradition | modernity | communication | expressive culture | magic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.715 Media in Cultural Context (MIT)

Description

This seminar is about the pleasures and power of reading. From the Sumerian clay tablets of more than four millenia ago through the spectacular emergence of the electronic text, the written word—in all its forms—has captivated the human mind, embodied our insights into the world around us, and made enduring our most profound artistic creations and scientific discoveries.

Subjects

reading | text | historical books | Marshall McLuhan | Italo Calvino | David Mitchell | Emily Dickinson | Jacques Derrida | media | printing | Don Quixote | bibles | modernity | Cloud Atlas | electronic text | written word | history of books

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Roads to modernity, 1789-1945

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn/Spring Semesters 2010/11. This module addresses the nature of ‘modernity’. It explores the ideas and historical experiences that transformed societies in Europe and around the world during a series of epic journeys from the distant past to the near present. In the autumn semester lectures and seminars provide a broad chronological survey of major events from 1789 to 1945. The focus is on key episodes and historical forces mainly in Europe but also traces their wider impact, following threads that have run through different places at different times. In the spring semester the module goes on to consider some of the themes that shaped modern society and culture, together with competing pol

Subjects

UNow | ukoer | Module Code: V11205 | modern society | modernity | reform | historical experiences | European history

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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CMS.801 Media in Transition (MIT)

Description

This course centers on historical eras in which the form and function of media technologies were radically transformed. It includes consideration of the "Gutenberg Revolution," the rise of modern mass media, and the "digital revolution," among other case studies of media transformation and cultural change. Readings cover cultural and social history and historiographic methods.

Subjects

Media | mass media | history | Gutenberg | cultural change | cultural history | social history | historiographic method | books | medieval history | codex book | writing | printing | printing press | stage | theater | renaissance | romanticism | modernity | inventions | photography | nineteenth century | image | telegraph | electrification | communication | Morse | Daguerreotype | Fox Talbot | phonograph | sound recording | radio | broadcasting | film | video | cinema | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Democracy or Dictatorship?

Description

could see dozens of countries converting to either democratic or authoritarian governments. To call it high stakes would be an understatement.

Subjects

India | China | economic | modernity | politics | system

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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17.547 Government and Politics of China (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes contemporary Chinese politics, both pre-Communist and Communist. It focuses on the process of modernization and political development of Chinese civilization. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject at greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

People's Republic of China | quest for modernity | modernization | relationship between citizen and state | PRC | PRC politics | China's political system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CC.111 Modern Conceptions of Freedom (MIT)

Description

This course examines the modern definition of freedom, and the obligations that people accept in honoring it. It investigates how these obligations are captured in the principles of our political associations. This course also studies how the centrality of freedom plays out in the political thought of such authors as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke and Montesquieu, as well as debating which notions of freedom inspire and sustain the American experiment by careful reading of the documents and arguments of the founding of the United States. This course is part of the Concourse program at MIT.

Subjects

enlightenment | the Constitution | Machiavelli | Hobbes | Locke | Rousseau | Tocqueville | Nietzche | founders | liberty | popular sovereignty | human nature | politics | Leviathan | government | Declaration of Independence | American constitutionalism | Federalist Papers | equality | statesmanship | Lincoln | modernity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Language, Identity, Modernity: The Arabic study circle of Durban

Description

Authors:  Dr Shamil Jeppie A fusion of linguistic, religious and ethnic groups with rich, diverse roots and intersecting histories make up South Africa. Clicked 133 times. Last clicked 09/23/2014 - 14:20. Teaching & Learning Context:  This innovative study introduces readers to a fascinating world of linguistic, religious and cultural politics in the South African port city of Durban from around 1950, the world of the Arabic Study Circle. This work provides an intimate sense of who they were and how they operated, their visions, as well as their international connections and contexts.

Subjects

Historical Studies | Humanities | Downloadable Documents | Readings | English | Post-secondary | 1950 society | arab | arab study circle | islamic modernity | Politics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/za/

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