Searching for morality : 97 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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The Battlefield from Afar: Independently Operating Systems and their Compatibility with the laws of Armed Conflict

Description

Markus Wagner, Associate Professor of Law, University of Miami Law School, gives a talk for the 2011 Hilary term ELAC/CCW seminar series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethics | defence | politics | security | war | conflict | morality | ethics | defence | politics | security | war | conflict | morality | 2011-02-15

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s Wars

Description

Dr Hugo Slim, Visiting Fellow in the department of politics and international relations, gives a talk for the 2011 Hilary term ELAC/CCW seminar series on armed conflict. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethics | defence | humanitarianism | politics | security | morality | war | conflict | aid | ethics | defence | humanitarianism | politics | security | morality | war | conflict | aid | 2011-02-14

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Uehiro Seminar: Psychopaths and responsibility

Description

Neil Levy explores some of the previous debates about whether psychopaths are fully responsible for their wrongdoing, especially work on the moral/conventional distinction. Psychopaths commit a disproportionate amount of crime, and seem cognitively unimpaired. They are often thought to be bad, not mad. I advance a deflationary explanation of the moral/conventional task, and argue that this explanation entails that psychopaths fail to act with the quality of will that would underwrite holding them to be fully responsible for their actions. Neil Levy specialises in free will and moral responsibility, and empirical approaches to ethics. He has published widely on many topics in philosophy, including bioethics, applied philosophy, continental philosophy and free will. He is the author of 4 b Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

convention | psychopath | free will | philosophy | morality | convention | psychopath | free will | philosophy | morality

License

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The Possibility of Religious-Secular Ethical Engagement Debate 1: Abortion

Description

The Possibility of Religious-Secular Ethical Engagement: Abortion. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

uehiro | philosophy | abortion | religion | ethics | feminism | morality | uehiro | philosophy | abortion | religion | ethics | feminism | morality

License

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The Possibility of Religious-Secular Ethical Engagement Debate 2: Euthanasia

Description

The Possibility of Religious-Secular Ethical Engagement: Euthanasia. Julian Savulescu and Charles Camosy held two public debates in Michaelmas Term 2012 under the series title 'The Possibility of Religious-Secular Ethical Engagement'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

uehiro | death | philosophy | euthanasia | ethics | morality | uehiro | death | philosophy | euthanasia | ethics | morality

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | brain imaging | brain imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | attention | attention | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.00 Problems in Philosophy (MIT) 24.00 Problems in Philosophy (MIT)

Description

The course has two goals. First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. Here we look at a number of perennial philosophical problems, including some or all of: how knowledge differs from "mere opinion," the objectivity (or not) of moral judgment, logical paradoxes, mind/body relations, the nature and possibility of free will, and how a person remains the same over time, as their bodily and psychological traits change. The second goal is to get you thinking philosophically yourself. This will help you develop your critical and argumentative skills more generally. Readings will be from late, great classical authors and influential contemporary figures. The course has two goals. First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. Here we look at a number of perennial philosophical problems, including some or all of: how knowledge differs from "mere opinion," the objectivity (or not) of moral judgment, logical paradoxes, mind/body relations, the nature and possibility of free will, and how a person remains the same over time, as their bodily and psychological traits change. The second goal is to get you thinking philosophically yourself. This will help you develop your critical and argumentative skills more generally. Readings will be from late, great classical authors and influential contemporary figures.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | existence | existence | God | God | reason | reason | faith | faith | mind-body | mind-body | free will | free will | identity | identity | deontology | deontology | morality | morality | moral responsibility | moral responsibility | materialism | materialism | functionalism | functionalism | argument | argument | pascal's wager | pascal's wager | compatibilism | compatibilism | determinism | determinism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Uehiro Seminar: Is Networking Immoral?

Description

If networking is considered to be either cultivating non-merit-based favouritism or demonstrating one?s merit in advance of formal selection processes, then I argue that it is an attempt to gain illegitimate advantage over competitors and is thus immoral. Networking is taken to be a perfectly innocuous part of business and career-advancement. I argue that, where the aim is to increase one?s prospects of prevailing in a formal competitive process for a job or university placement, networking is an attempt to gain illegitimate advantage. This is true no matter which of the two standard characterisations we accept. If networking is about building personal relationships, as some claim, then it involves cultivating non-merit-based favouritism. To that extent it shares one of the wrong-makin Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

business ethics | networking | morality | advantage | business ethics | networking | morality | advantage | 3-12-13

License

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24.231 Ethics (MIT) 24.231 Ethics (MIT)

Description

This will be a seminar on classic and contemporary work on central topics in ethics. The first third of the course will focus on metaethics: we will examine the meaning of moral claims and ask whether there is any sense in which moral principles are objectively valid. The second third of the course will focus on normative ethics: what makes our lives worth living, what makes our actions right or wrong, and what do we owe to others? The final third of the course will focus on moral character: what is virtue, and how important is it? Can we be held responsible for what we do? When and why? This will be a seminar on classic and contemporary work on central topics in ethics. The first third of the course will focus on metaethics: we will examine the meaning of moral claims and ask whether there is any sense in which moral principles are objectively valid. The second third of the course will focus on normative ethics: what makes our lives worth living, what makes our actions right or wrong, and what do we owe to others? The final third of the course will focus on moral character: what is virtue, and how important is it? Can we be held responsible for what we do? When and why?

Subjects

ethics | ethics | euthyphro | euthyphro | Plato | Plato | goodness | goodness | non-naturalism | non-naturalism | G. E. Moore | G. E. Moore | non-cognitivism | non-cognitivism | Alfred Jules Ayer | Alfred Jules Ayer | David Brink | David Brink | cognitivism | cognitivism | Gilbert Harman | Gilbert Harman | Nicholas Sturgeon | Nicholas Sturgeon | observation | observation | morality | morality | moral relativism | moral relativism | Philippa Foot | Philippa Foot | David Lyons | David Lyons | incoherence | incoherence | ethical relativism | ethical relativism | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | Robert Nozick | Robert Nozick | Derek Parfit | Derek Parfit | Alastair Norcross | Alastair Norcross | philosophy | philosophy | Bernard Williams | Bernard Williams | James Lenman | James Lenman | consequentialism | consequentialism | cluelessness | cluelessness | Peter Singer | Peter Singer | act-utilitarianism | act-utilitarianism | John Rawls | John Rawls | rules | rules | Thomas Nagel | Thomas Nagel | famine | famine | affluence | affluence | Nomy Arpaly | Nomy Arpaly | moral worth | moral worth | Susan Wolf | Susan Wolf | moral saints | moral saints | Peter van Inwagen | Peter van Inwagen | free will | free will | determinism | determinism | Harry Frankfurt | Harry Frankfurt | moral responsibility | moral responsibility | moral luck | moral luck

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2nd St Cross Special Ethics Seminar TT11: Museum Ethics

Description

Museum Ethics. The Museum world, like most professions, encounters various ethical problems. This short talk will consider the ethics of conservation and reconstruction, and of human remains, but will mostly discuss ethical problems associated with the acquisition of cultural property from other countries. Archaeologists are particularly concerned that the trade in antiquities leads to the looting of sites, and illegal export of valuable items. How far can British and American museums continue to maintain collections from the great ancient civilisations when they are unable to acquire important recent finds from other countries? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

museums | st cross | ethics | uehiro | morality | museums | st cross | ethics | uehiro | morality | 2011-06-23

License

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New Imaging Evidence for the Neural Bases of Moral Sentiments: Prosocial and Antisocial Behaviour

Description

2nd Annual Wellcome Lecture in Neuroethics, given by Professor Jorge Moll on 18th January 2011 on the subject of new evidence for Neural bases for moral sentiments. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

uehiro | brain imaging | philosophy | neuroscience | ethics | morality | uehiro | brain imaging | philosophy | neuroscience | ethics | morality | 2011-01-18

License

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24.230 Meta-ethics (MIT) 24.230 Meta-ethics (MIT)

Description

This course considers a range of philosophical questions about the foundations of morality, such as whether and in what sense morality is objective, the nature of moral discourse, and how we can come to know right from wrong. This course considers a range of philosophical questions about the foundations of morality, such as whether and in what sense morality is objective, the nature of moral discourse, and how we can come to know right from wrong.

Subjects

moral statements | moral statements | morality | morality | ethics | ethics | ethical inquiry | ethical inquiry | scientific inquiry | scientific inquiry | right and wrong | right and wrong | moral realism | moral realism | plato | plato | naturalism | naturalism | moral anti-realism | moral anti-realism | non-cognitivism | non-cognitivism | reason | reason

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.191 Ethics in Your Life: Being, Thinking, Doing (or Not?) (MIT) 24.191 Ethics in Your Life: Being, Thinking, Doing (or Not?) (MIT)

Description

This seminar is made possible through a collaboration between Radius and the Philosophy section of MIT. This course provides an opportunity to explore a wide range of ethical issues through guided discussions that are geared to equip students for ongoing reflection and action. Lectures and discussions with guest faculty, as well as attendance at on-and off-campus events, expose students to ethical problems and resources for addressing them. The course also encourages students to work collaboratively as they clarify their personal and vocational principles.Topics vary each term and reflect the interests of those enrolled. This seminar is made possible through a collaboration between Radius and the Philosophy section of MIT. This course provides an opportunity to explore a wide range of ethical issues through guided discussions that are geared to equip students for ongoing reflection and action. Lectures and discussions with guest faculty, as well as attendance at on-and off-campus events, expose students to ethical problems and resources for addressing them. The course also encourages students to work collaboratively as they clarify their personal and vocational principles.Topics vary each term and reflect the interests of those enrolled.

Subjects

ethics | ethics | global poor | global poor | homeless | homeless | disenfranchised | disenfranchised | death penalty | death penalty | prison | prison | Examined Life | Examined Life | famine | famine | affluence | affluence | morality | morality | racial profiling | racial profiling | justice system | justice system | criminal punishment | criminal punishment | deterrence | deterrence | military spending | military spending | federal spending | federal spending | farming | farming | gaming | gaming

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Moral Development and Self-Knowledge in Aristotle

Description

Steve Makin, (Sheffield) gives a talk for the Power Structualism in Ancient Ontologies podcast series Abstract: Aristotle emphasises the role of habituation in our acquiring moral virtues, as well as other abilities. I discuss an independently engaging problem concerning the acquisition of abilities through practice, formulated in the context of Aristotle?s account of virtue development. The problem consists in a tension between two plausible claims, one [A] concerning what is required for an agent to be acting on a decision, the other [B] concerning the view a novice should have of whether they could ever possible be making the decisions required for moral development. I recommend a solution: the self-blind novice response. That solution implies that self-blindness should be pervasive a Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | aristotle | ethics | morality | philosophy | aristotle | ethics | morality

License

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Plato on tradition and belief Plato on tradition and belief

Description

How can we settle questions of morality or ethics? This free course, Plato on tradition and belief, explores Plato's dialogue, the Laches, to discover why Plato thought that we should look to reason, rather than tradition, to decide how we should live and what it means to be courageous. First published on Fri, 15 Jan 2016 as Plato on tradition and belief. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 How can we settle questions of morality or ethics? This free course, Plato on tradition and belief, explores Plato's dialogue, the Laches, to discover why Plato thought that we should look to reason, rather than tradition, to decide how we should live and what it means to be courageous. First published on Fri, 15 Jan 2016 as Plato on tradition and belief. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

History & The Arts | History & The Arts | Classical Studies | Classical Studies | AA100_2 | AA100_2 | Plato | Plato | tradition | tradition | belief | belief | Laches | Laches | morality | morality | ethics | ethics

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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9.00 Introduction to Psychology (MIT) 9.00 Introduction to Psychology (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course surveys questions about human behavior and mental life ranging from how you see to why you fall in love. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Students are exposed to the range of theoretical perspectives including biological, evolutionary, cognitive, and psychoanalytic. One of the best aspects of Psychology is that you are the subject matter. This makes it possible to do many demonstrations in lecture that allow you to experience the topic under study. Lectures work in tandem with the textbook. The course breaks into small recitations sections to allow discussion, oral presentations, and individual contact with instructors. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course surveys questions about human behavior and mental life ranging from how you see to why you fall in love. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Students are exposed to the range of theoretical perspectives including biological, evolutionary, cognitive, and psychoanalytic. One of the best aspects of Psychology is that you are the subject matter. This makes it possible to do many demonstrations in lecture that allow you to experience the topic under study. Lectures work in tandem with the textbook. The course breaks into small recitations sections to allow discussion, oral presentations, and individual contact with instructors.

Subjects

human behavior | human behavior | brain | brain | perception | perception | memory | memory | motivation | motivation | emotion | emotion | learning | learning | senses | senses | sensation | sensation | cognition | cognition | thinking | thinking | language | language | intelligence | intelligence | love | love | evolution | evolution | attitude | attitude | behavior | behavior | self | self | dissociation | dissociation | repression | repression | morality | morality | Freud | Freud | sleep | sleep | dreams | dreams | mental illness | mental illness | fairy tale | fairy tale

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.69 Foundations of Cognition (MIT) 9.69 Foundations of Cognition (MIT)

Description

Advances in cognitive science have resolved, clarified, and sometimes complicated some of the great questions of Western philosophy: what is the structure of the world and how do we come to know it; does everyone represent the world the same way; what is the best way for us to act in the world. Specific topics include color, objects, number, categories, similarity, inductive inference, space, time, causality, reasoning, decision-making, morality and consciousness. Readings and discussion include a brief philosophical history of each topic and focus on advances in cognitive and developmental psychology, computation, neuroscience, and related fields. At least one subject in cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, or artificial intelligence is required. An additional project i Advances in cognitive science have resolved, clarified, and sometimes complicated some of the great questions of Western philosophy: what is the structure of the world and how do we come to know it; does everyone represent the world the same way; what is the best way for us to act in the world. Specific topics include color, objects, number, categories, similarity, inductive inference, space, time, causality, reasoning, decision-making, morality and consciousness. Readings and discussion include a brief philosophical history of each topic and focus on advances in cognitive and developmental psychology, computation, neuroscience, and related fields. At least one subject in cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, or artificial intelligence is required. An additional project i

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | Western philosophy | Western philosophy | structure | structure | color | color | objects | objects | number | number | similarity | similarity | inductive inference | inductive inference | space | space | time | time | reasoning | reasoning | decision-making | decision-making | morality | morality | consciousness | consciousness | development | development | psychology | psychology | computation | computation | neuroscience | neuroscience | philosophy | philosophy | linguistics | linguistics | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Quidditism and Modal Methodology

Description

Alastair Wilson, Birmingham, gives a talk for the Power Structuralism in Ancient Ontologies series Abstract: Jonathan Schaffer has recently defended the doctrine of quidditism against an epistemological challenge, claiming that the challenge amounts to nothing more than ?external-world scepticism writ small?. I disagree with this assessment. The cases are significantly disanalogous, and quiddistic scepticism is much harder to avoid than external-world scepticism. Ultimately, the epistemological challenge is indecisive: quidditists can live with the sceptical conclusion. But there is a stronger anti-quidditist argument in the vicinity. Following John Hawthorne, I show how the epistemological challenge can be reformulated as an argument from theoretical parsimony. I argue that whether th Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | quidditism | morality | ethics | philosophy | quidditism | morality | ethics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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24.502 Topics in Metaphysics and Ethics (MIT) 24.502 Topics in Metaphysics and Ethics (MIT)

Description

This is a class about 'ought' and ought—you can think of it as a class in philosophy of language and metaphysics in which the focus is the ethical sphere. Some of the questions that we will broach include: How should we give a semantics for 'ought' generally? Is there anything special about the ethical 'ought'? Is there anything that you ethically ought to do, e.g., give to charity or refrain from stealing? This is a class about 'ought' and ought—you can think of it as a class in philosophy of language and metaphysics in which the focus is the ethical sphere. Some of the questions that we will broach include: How should we give a semantics for 'ought' generally? Is there anything special about the ethical 'ought'? Is there anything that you ethically ought to do, e.g., give to charity or refrain from stealing?

Subjects

ought | ought | philosophy | philosophy | metaphysics | metaphysics | ethics | ethics | morals | morals | right and wrong | right and wrong | language | language | contextualism | contextualism | relativism | relativism | realism | realism | choice | choice | expressivism | expressivism | minimalism | minimalism | internalism | internalism | non-naturalism | non-naturalism | morality | morality | supervenience | supervenience | contingentism | contingentism | principles | principles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Inclination and the Modality of Dispositions

Description

Mark Sinclair (Manchester Metropolitan) gives a talk for the Power Structualism in Ancient Ontologies series In Getting Causes from Powers, Steven Mumford and Rani Lil Anjum have argued that all dispositions are to be thought as tendencies or inclinations; that such tendencies or inclinations have a sui generis modality, irreducible to traditional ideas of necessity or possibility; and that we have direct experience of such inclinations in our subjective experience of agency. In this paper, I critically assess these arguments in the light of 19th-century French philosophy. I turn to the work of Pierre Maine de Biran and Félix Ravaisson in order to develop the claim that a particular and irreducible modality of dispositions is indeed available to us in subjective experience ? but in the Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | morality | ethics | inclination | philosophy | morality | ethics | inclination

License

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9.69 Foundations of Cognition (MIT) 9.69 Foundations of Cognition (MIT)

Description

Advances in cognitive science have resolved, clarified, and sometimes complicated some of the great questions of Western philosophy: what is the structure of the world and how do we come to know it; does everyone represent the world the same way; what is the best way for us to act in the world. Specific topics include color, objects, number, categories, similarity, inductive inference, space, time, causality, reasoning, decision-making, morality and consciousness. Readings and discussion include a brief philosophical history of each topic and focus on advances in cognitive and developmental psychology, computation, neuroscience, and related fields. At least one subject in cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, or artificial intelligence is required. An additional project i Advances in cognitive science have resolved, clarified, and sometimes complicated some of the great questions of Western philosophy: what is the structure of the world and how do we come to know it; does everyone represent the world the same way; what is the best way for us to act in the world. Specific topics include color, objects, number, categories, similarity, inductive inference, space, time, causality, reasoning, decision-making, morality and consciousness. Readings and discussion include a brief philosophical history of each topic and focus on advances in cognitive and developmental psychology, computation, neuroscience, and related fields. At least one subject in cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, or artificial intelligence is required. An additional project i

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | Western philosophy | Western philosophy | structure | structure | color | color | objects | objects | number | number | similarity | similarity | inductive inference | inductive inference | space | space | time | time | reasoning | reasoning | decision-making | decision-making | morality | morality | consciousness | consciousness | development | development | psychology | psychology | computation | computation | neuroscience | neuroscience | philosophy | philosophy | linguistics | linguistics | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.118J Feminist Political Thought (MIT) 17.118J Feminist Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of political theory. In addition we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality. This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of political theory. In addition we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality.

Subjects

feminism | feminism | political theory | political theory | modern society | modern society | citizenship | citizenship | women | women | sexuality | sexuality | race | race | class | class | poverty | poverty | welfare | welfare | power | power | culture | culture | morality | morality | gender | gender | modern life | modern life | feminist scholarship | feminist scholarship | public | public | private | private | roles | roles | civil society | civil society | political culture | political culture | WMN.412J | WMN.412J | 17.118 | 17.118 | SP.412 | SP.412 | WMN.412 | WMN.412

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.01J Justice (MIT) 17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered. This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered.

Subjects

just society | just society | values of liberty | values of liberty | equality | equality | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | moral-political controversy | moral-political controversy | sexual morality | sexual morality | financing schools and elections | financing schools and elections | religious liberty | religious liberty | labor markets | labor markets | health care | health care | affirmative action | affirmative action | abortion | abortion | global justice | global justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Moral Conformity

Description

Sinnott-Armstrong is the Chauncey Stillman Professor of Ethics at Duke University. In this inaugural workshop, professors from Duke University presented papers in Oxford in June 2015. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

practical ethics | bioethics | morality | conformity | practical ethics | bioethics | morality | conformity

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.450 Literature and Ethical Values (MIT) 21L.450 Literature and Ethical Values (MIT)

Description

The aim of this subject is to acquaint the student with some important works of systematic ethical philosophy and to bring to bear the viewpoint of those works on the study of classic works of literature. This subject will trace the history of ethical speculation in systematic philosophy by identifying four major positions: two from the ancient world and the two most important traditions of ethical philosophy since the renaissance. The two ancient positions will be represented by Plato and Aristotle, the two modern positions by Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill. We will try to understand these four positions as engaged in a rivalry with one another, and we will also engage with the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes, which offers a bridge between ancient and modern conceptions and provides The aim of this subject is to acquaint the student with some important works of systematic ethical philosophy and to bring to bear the viewpoint of those works on the study of classic works of literature. This subject will trace the history of ethical speculation in systematic philosophy by identifying four major positions: two from the ancient world and the two most important traditions of ethical philosophy since the renaissance. The two ancient positions will be represented by Plato and Aristotle, the two modern positions by Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill. We will try to understand these four positions as engaged in a rivalry with one another, and we will also engage with the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes, which offers a bridge between ancient and modern conceptions and provides

Subjects

ethics | ethics | values | values | literature | literature | morality | morality | justice | justice | virtue | virtue | literary theory | literary theory | responsibility | responsibility | politics | politics | plato | plato | aristotle | aristotle | machiavelli | machiavelli | hobbes | hobbes | sophocles | sophocles | euripides | euripides | shapkespeare | shapkespeare | swift | swift | ibsen | ibsen | shaw | shaw | dostoyevsky | dostoyevsky | conrad | conrad | bible | bible

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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